moringa

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Moringa and plant resources of the future

Litterature

You will find here a list of litterature references on Moringa and, for most of them, their abstract. Click on the title to open the full file. You can search by theme (grey tags), key word ou author.
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Agronomy

  • Growth pattern of some young hardwood species grown in Riyadh region.
    Abo-Hassan, A.A., El-Osta, M.L.M. 1983

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Journal of the College of Agriculture, King Saud University. 1983. v. 5 p. 125-136. ill. | |
    Keywords : hardwoods; growth
    Location : |
    Database : AGRICOLA, S539.5 J62

  • Familial tendency and dietary association of goitre in Gamo-Gofa, Ethiopia.
    Abuye, C., Omwega, A.M. Imungi, J.K. 1999

    Objective: To assess the familial tendency and dietary association of goitre. Design: Cross-sectional study with descriptive and analytical components. Setting: Goma-Gofa, south Ethiopia. Subjects: Five hundred and ninety seven elementary school children aged 6-18 years and their biological parents. Results: Prevalence of goitre was found to be 51.7% of which 21.7% was visible goitre. The mean urinary iodine extraction levels indicated adequate dietary intake of iodine by the study group. A significant association (p<0.001) was established for familial tendency of goitre between parents and their children. Consumption of halleko (Moringa stenopetala), a leafy vegetable common in the study area, of more than two times per day was significantly (p<0.005) associated with causation of goitre. Conclusion: These results strongly suggest that goitre prevalence in Gamo-Gofa, Ethiopia is due to familial tendency as well as dietary factors.
    Journal article
    East African medical journal. [ East Afr. med. j.. ] 1999 , vol. 76 , no 8 , pp. 447 - 451 | Ethiopian Health and Nutrition Institute, P.O. Box 5654, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. | 0012-835X
    Keywords : goitre; epidemiology; risk factors; iodine; nutritional state; diet studies
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10520350&dopt=Abstract | Ethiopia
    Database : CABI, 20002007618 INIST, 17259 Pubmed, 10520350 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Lectin receptors in glycoproteins from honeycomb and wasp nest.
    Ahmed, H., Chatterjee, B. P. 1988

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Biochemical Archives 4(4): 365-372. | |
    Keywords :
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    Database :

  • Anti-ulcerogenic evaluation of the methanolic extracts of some indigenous medicinal plants of Pakistan in aspirin-ulcerated rats.
    Akhtar, A.H., Ahmad, K.U. 1995

    Anti-ulcerogenic activity of the methanolic extracts of 4 medicinal plants were studied in aspirin-induced gastric ulcers in rats. Their effects on the volume of gastric juice secreted, acid output, peptic activity, mucin activity and curative ratio were recorded. Bauhinia racemosa (flower buds) decreased the ulcer index significantly, and Moringa pterygosperma (flower buds) showed some decrease in the ulcer index. Trianthema pentandra (whole plant) did not show any decrease in the acid or pepsin content or any increase in mucin; however, it showed a highly significant decrease in the ulcer index. Cordia latifolia (ripened fruit) did not however decrease the ulcer index.
    Journal article
    Journal of Ethnopharmacology, April 1995, vol. 46, no. 1, pp. 1-6(6) Elsevier Science | Pharmacology Section, Natural Drug Division, P.C.S.I.R. Laboratories, Peshawar 25120, Pakistan | 0378-8741
    Keywords : medicinal plants; ulcers; plant extracts; Methanolic extract; Anti-ulcerogenic activity
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=7475118&dopt=Abstract | Pakistan
    Database : AGRICOLA, RS160 J6 CABI, 19950310047 Ingenta, Online articles, DOI (article): 10.1016/S0378-8741(94)01220-T INIST, 18028 Pubmed, 7475118 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Hepatogenic photosensitization dermatitis in crossbred calves and its therapy.
    Amalendu Chakrabarti, 1999

    Three crossbred calves were studied after accidental ingestion of Lantana for 3 days. Clinical signs included raised body temperature, heart and respiration rates and necrotic, ulcerative skin lesions. The calves were treated with Nutri Liv-82 (oral preparation of Andrographis paniculata, Picrorhiza kurroa, Hygrophila spinosa and Terminalia chebula ) and Nutriderm (topical preparation of Moringa pterygosperma, Allium sativum and Azadirachta indica ). Cattle made a full recovery by 21 days after treatment.
    Journal article
    Indian Journal of Animal Health, 1998, Vol.37, No.1, pp.51-53, 7 ref. | Department of Veterinary Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, West Bengal University of Animal and Fishery Sciences, Calcutta-700 037, India. | 0019-5057
    Keywords : poisonous plants; medicinal plants; skin diseases; treatment; topical application
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19992200184

  • The hydroxyproline content of gum exudates from several plant genera.
    Anderson, D. M. W., Howlett, J. F. et al. 1987

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Phytochemistry 26(1): 309-311. | |
    Keywords :
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  • The gum exudates from Chloroxylon swietenia, Sclerocarya caffra, Azadirachta indica and Moringa oleifera.
    Anderson, D.M.W., Bell, P.C. Gill, M.C.L. McDougal, F.J. McNab, C.G.A. 1986

    Analytical data are presented for polysaccharide and proteinaceous components of exudates of C. swietenia and S. caffra, and for the amino acid composition of exudates from A. indica (2 specimens) and M. oleifera.
    Journal article
    Phytochemistry. 1986. v. 25 (1) p. 247-249. | Chemistry Department, The University, Edinburgh EH9 3JJ, UK. | 0031-9422
    Keywords : gums; exudates; polysaccharides; amino acids; chemical analysis
    Location : |
    Database : AGRICOLA, 450 P5622 CABI, 19890630857

  • Effectiveness of a plant polymer as an antioxidant
    Bag B.C., Ghosh A.K. Adhikari B. Maiti S. 0

    A renewable polymer collected as a gum from a local plant (Moringa oleifera) was blended with styrene butadiene rubber (SBR). Tensile properties like 200% modulus, 300% modulus, elongation at break (%), tensile strength and hardness of filled vulcanizates were measured before and after isothermal aging at 100oC for 24, 48 and 72 h in presence of air. The results are compared with a non-polymeric antioxidant additive N-phenyl-N'-isopropyl-p-phenylene diamine (IPPD). The plant polymer is only slightly less effective than IPPD as an antioxidant.
    Journal article
    Polymer Degradation and Stability, August 1998, vol. 61, no. 2, pp. 303-307(5) Elsevier Science | Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302, India | 0141-3910
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : Ingenta, Online articles, DOI (article): 10.1016/S0141-3910(97)00214-0, SICI (online): 0141-3910612303307 INIST, 18819

  • Effect of some medicinal plants on skin tumor promotion.
    Balboa, J. G., Lim-Sylianco, C. Y. 1996

    The multistage model of carcinogenesis is represented as follows: initiation right arrow promotion right arrow conversion right arrow progression. The skin promotion test was used to study the effect of expressed juices from some medicinal plants on the promotion stage of carcinogenesis. A combination of dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) as the initiator and croton oil as the promoter led to a high incidence of skin tumours in experimental mice after 10 weeks. Expressed juices from lagundi (Vitex negundo ) leaves, ampalaya (Momordica charantia ) fruits, tanglad (Cymbopogon citratus ) roots and malunggay (Moringa oleifera ) leaves reduced appreciably the incidence of skin tumours. However, expressed juice from tanglad leaves did not reduce the incidence of skin tumours initiated by dimethylbenzanthracene and promoted by croton oil.
    Journal article
    Philippine Journal of Science, 1995, Vol.124, No.2, pp.203-207, 2 ref. | Institute of Chemistry, College of Science, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City, Philippines. | 0031-7683
    Keywords : medicinal properties; leaves; fruits; roots; carcinogenesis; neoplasms
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19970303638

  • Trinkwassaraufbereitung mit Samen von Moringa oleifera Lam.
    Barth, V.H., Habs, M. Klute, R.. Muller, S. Tauscher, B. 1982

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Chemiker-Zeitung 106, 75-78 | |
    Keywords :
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  • Phytochemical screening of some Indian plants.
    Bhattacharjee, A.K., Das, A.K. 1969

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Quart J Crude Drug Res 9,1408. | |
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  • Chemical investigations on the gum exudate from sajna (Moringa oleifera). Enriched title: Chemical investigations on the gum exudate from sajna (Moringa oleifera) [Drug plant]
    Bhattacharya, S.B., Das, A.K. Banerji, N. 1982

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Carbohydrate research.Apr 16, 1982. v. 102 p. 253-262. | | 0393-5965
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : AGRICOLA, 385 C172 Ingenta, Online articles, SICI (online): 0393-5965154311315

  • Studies of the lignin chemistry of Moringa species.
    Bindhu Dhasmana, Madan, R. N. 1989

    Two types of lignin (ethanol soluble lignin and thiolignin) were isolated from chipped and powdered logs of 2 Moringa species (M. oleifera and M. concenensis [M. concanensis] ). These species yielded 6.2 and 5.8% ethanol soluble lignin and 12.1 and 10.9% of thiolignin, respectively. Both lignins were analysed for elemental composition and functional chemical groups. Methoxyl content varied from 16.8 to 21.6% and total hydroxyl content from 9.7 to 15.3%. Alkaline nitrobenzene oxidation of isolated lignins was also carried out and oxidation products were identified as vanillin and syringaldehyde. IR spectroscopic data from isolated lignin are also reported; bonds of methoxyl, hydroxyl and keto groups were observed.
    Journal article
    Van Vigyan, 1989, Vol.27, No.4, pp.190-194, 8 ref. | Forest Products Division, Forest Research Institute, Dehra Dun, UP, India. | 0970-3071
    Keywords : Broadleaves; Lignin; structure; chemistry
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19930663955

  • Studies on the chemical composition and hemicelluloses of Moringa species.
    Bindhu Dhasmana, Madan, R. N. 1990

    Analyses are reported of wood meal of Moringa oleifera and Moringa concenensis [M. concanensis] . Data are given for extractive, lignin, holocellulose, ash and acetyl content, analysed according to standard TAPPI procedures.
    Journal article
    Van Vigyan, 1990, Vol.28, No.1-2, pp.1-5, 7 ref. | Cellulose and Paper Branch, Forest Research Institute, Dehra Dun, India. | 0970-3071
    Keywords : broadleaves; wood chemistry
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19940600706

  • Effect of Moringa oleifera bark on the male reproductive functions in rats.
    Biswas, A. R., Ramaswamy, S. Rajasekaran, M. Bapna, J. S. 1988

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Medical Science Research, 1988, Vol.16, No.23, pp.1219-1220, 9 ref. | Department of Pharmacology, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Pondicherry 605006, India. | 0269-8951
    Keywords : medicinal properties; composition; vegetables
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19910306137

  • Les plantes employ?es contre les affections h?patiques en m?decine traditionnelle africaine
    Bitsindou, M., Lejoly, J. Van Essche, K. 1996

    (No abstract)
    Article in book
    IN : Schr?der, E. (ed.); Balansard, G. (ed.); Cabalion, Pierre (ed.); Fleurentin, J. (ed.); Mazars, G. (ed.) - M?dicaments et aliments : approche ethnopharmacologique = Medicines and foods : ethnopharmacological approach. ORSTOM; SFE, Paris (FRA); Metz (F | |
    Keywords : traditional medicine; medicinal plant; liver; ethnobotany; vegetation inventory
    Location : http://www.bondy.ird.fr/pleins_textes/pleins_textes_6/colloques2/010005533.pdf | Africa
    Database : Horizon, F A010005511/2; B CB52 80/1; M CM 11/1; M 056SOCSAN HEI/1; C EB20-001 HEI/1; NI 076PLAMED03SCH/1; CA GFBrB5FLE/1; W 5630/1; Q 615 SCH/1; V VEG 3486/1; E A63 SCH/1; PT C12/1; PT SANT.SCH/1

  • Plantes m?dicinales de la C?te d'Ivoire
    Bouquet, Armand, Debray, Maurice 1974

    (No abstract)
    Book
    ORSTOM, Paris(FR), 1974, 232 p. multigr., bibl., tabl., phot. - (Travaux et Documents de l'ORSTOM (FRA), No 32) | |
    Keywords : ethnic; vernacular name; medicinal plant; inventory; pharmacopoeia; chemical analysis
    Location : | Ivory Cost
    Database : Horizon, F A06894/3; B CB12/2; M CM 9/1; M A06894/1; C EB23-132 BOU/1; E A34 BOU/1

  • Chemistry and pharmacology of Moringa oleifera Lam and M. concanensis Nimo
    Jadhav, S. L., Sharma, S. R. Pal, S. C. Kasture, S. B. Kasture, V. S. 2000

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Indian drugs. 2000 , vol. 37 , no 3 , pp. 139 - 144 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : INIST, 19200

  • Evaluation of hematological and hepatorenal functions of methanolic extract of Moringa oleifera Lam. root treated mice
    Mazumber, U.K., Gupta, M. Chakrabarti, S. Pal, D. 1999

    The methanolic extract of M. oleifera roots contained alkaloids (0.2%). The effect of the crude extract (weekly doses of 35, 46 or 70 mg/kg, i.p., and daily doses of 3.5, 4.6 or 7 mg/kg, i.p.) on liver and kidney functions and haematological parameters in mice were studied. Low doses had no effect on haematological and biochemical parameters. In the weekly treatment, a moderate dose changed serum aminotransferase and plasma cholesterol levels significantly, and the high dose additionally changed total bilirubin, non protein nitrogen, blood urea and plasma protein values. In the daily treatment, the high dose affected biochemical parameters. This dose and the moderate and high dose in the weekly treatment increased white blood cell count and decreased clotting time significantly.
    Journal article
    Indian journal of experimental biology. 1999 , vol. 37 , no 6 , pp. 612 - 614 | Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Jadavpur University, Jadavpur, Calcutta 700032, India. | 0019-5189
    Keywords : toxicology; roots; alkaloids; cholesterol; urea; plant composition
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10641193&dopt=Abstract |
    Database : CABI, 19990308260 INIST, 2364C Pubmed, 10641193 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Pharmacological properties of Moringa oleifera. 1. Preliminary screening of antimicrobial activity.
    Caceres, A., Cabrera, O. Morales, O. Mollinedo, P. Mendia, P. 1991

    The antimicrobial activities of Moringa oleifera leaves, roots, bark and seeds were investigated in vitro against bacteria, yeast, dermatophytes and helminths pathogenic to main. By a disk-diffusion method, it was demonstrated that the fresh leaf juice and aqueous extracts from the seeds inhibit the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus and that extraction temperatures above 56 degrees C inhibited this activity. No activity was demonstrated against four other pathogenic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and Candida albicans. By a dilution method, no activity was demonstrated against six pathogenic dermatophytes. A method was standardized for studying the effect of aqueous extracts on Ascaris lumbricoides eggs, but no activity was exibited by any part of the tree in contrast to Chenopodium ambrosioides leaf extracts.
    Journal article
    Journal of ethno-pharmacology, July 1991. v. 33 (3) p. 213-216. | Center for Mesoamerican Studies on Appropriate Technology (CEMAT) | 0378-8741
    Keywords : dermatophytes; helminths; plant extracts; pharmacology; traditional medicines; antimicrobial propert
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=1921416&dopt=Abstract | Guatemala
    Database : AGRICOLA, RS160 J6 CABI, 19920312873 INIST, 18028 Pubmed, 1921416 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Pharmacological properties of Moringa oleifera. 3. Effects of seed extracts in the treatment of experimental pydermia
    Caceres, A., Lopez, S 1991

    An experimental model of Staphylococcus aureus pyodermia in mice was treated with a vaseline-based ointment containing neomycin, an aqueous extract of M. oleifera seeds or an oily extract of the seeds. Vaseline alone was also applied, the controls being untreated. The lesion healed in 7-8 days with neomycin and with both the extracts, compared with 10-11 days for vaseline and controls.
    Journal article
    Fitoterapia 62(5): 449-450. | Faculty of Chemical Sciences and Pharmacy, University of San Carlos, Ciudad Universitaria, Zona 12, PO Box 1160, Guatemala City, Guatemala. | 0367-326X
    Keywords : medicinal properties; seeds; composition; extracts
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19920311888

  • Pharmacologic properties of Moringa oleifera. 2. Screening for antispasmodic, antiinflammatory and diurectic activity.
    Caceres, A., Saravia, A. Rizzo, S. Zabala, L. Leon, E. de. Nave, F. 1992

    Hot water infusions of flowers, leaves, roots, seeds and stalks or bark of Moringa oleifera were screened to detect three pharmacologic activities in experimental models in rats. The antispasmodic activity was demonstrated using isolated duodenum, oral antiinflammatory activity by carrageenan-induced hindpaw edema and oral diuretic activity by urine output in metabolic cages. The seed infusion showed a significant inhibition of acetylcholine-induced contraction with an ED50 of 65.6 mg/ml bath concentration, inhibition of carrageenan-induced edema at 1000 mg/kg and diuretic activity at 1000 mg/kg. Some activity was also demonstrated in the roots. All doses expressed here are as equivalents of dried starting plant material.
    Journal article
    Journal of ethno-pharmacology, June 1992. v. 36 (3) p. 233-237. | Center for Mesoamerican Studies on Appropriate Technology (CEMAT), Guatemala City, Guatemala. |
    Keywords : pharmacology; screening; spasms; rats; antiinflammatory agents; diuretics
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=1434682&dopt=Abstract |
    Database : AGRICOLA, RS160 J6 INIST, 18028 Pubmed, 1434682 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Chemical composition of some common tree leaves.
    Chakraborti, N., Mandal, L. Banerjee, G. C. 1988

    The chemical composition of leaves taken from 36 trees was estimated and the results are tabulated. All the tree leaves contained more than 9% crude protein, with karanja (Pongamia glabra [P. pinnata] ) containing 42.65%, followed by custard apple (Annona squamosa ) with 27.28%. Other tree leaves which contained appreciable crude protein contents were Alstonia scholaris, Syzygium malaccense, Ziziphus sativa, Butea monosperma, Leucaena leucocephala and Moringa oleifera. Some of the tree leaves were high in lignin. It was concluded that most of the tree leaves are a source of green roughage provided they are free from any anti-nutritional factors.
    Journal article
    Indian Veterinary Journal, 1988, Vol.65, No.2, pp.145-149, 5 ref. | Department of Animal Nutrition, Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya, Mohanpur, Nadia, West Bengal, India. | 0019-6479
    Keywords : nutritive value; Foliage; chemistry; broadleaves; Plant composition
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19901427528

  • A note on physiological and chemical findings of the active principle (Spirochin) of Moringa pterygosperma)
    Chatterjee, G.S., Mitra, S.R. 1951

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Sci. & Cult. 17:43 | |
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  • Pharmacological studies of thiocarbamate glycosides isolated from Moringa oleifera
    Chaweewan Jansakul, Anchalee Wun-Noi Croft K. Byrne L. 1997

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    J Sci Soc Thailand, 1997, 23 : 335-346 | |
    Keywords :
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  • Indigenous drugs of India
    Chopra, R.N., 1938

    (No abstract)
    Book
    there medicinal and economical aspects Art press, Calcutta, pp 344-347. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Proteolytic enzymes of Moringa oleifera seeds.
    Dahot, M. U., Ali, S. A. et al. 1985

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Journal Of Pharmacy 6(1-2): 1-10. | |
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  • Antimicrobial Activity of Small Protein of Moringa Oleifera Leaves
    Dahot, M. U., 0

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Journal of Islamic Academy of Sciences Volume 11, No.1 | |
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  • Properties of Moringa oleifera seed lipase.
    Dahot, M. U., Memon, A. R. 1987

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Pakistan Journal Of Scientific And Industrial Research 30(11): 832-835. | |
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  • Antibiotic principle from Moringa pterygosperma VII. Antibacterial activity and chemical structure of compounds related to pterygospermin
    Das, B.R., et al. 1957

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Indian J. Med. Res. 45:191-196 | |
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  • Inhibition of nitrosation reaction by some spices/leafy vegetables.
    Krishnakumar, Aruna, Sivaramakrishnan, V. M. Sivaswamy, S. N. 1991

    Nitrosodiethanolamine (NDEA) is a potent environmental carcinogen which induces tumours in laboratory animals. It has been demonstrated that triethanolamine (TELA) could undergo nitrosation in vivo under simulated conditions to yield NDEA. Various plant products (cumin [Cuminum cyminum ] seeds, poppy [Papaver somniferum ] seeds, asafoetida [Ferula assa-foetida ], Piper longum, Alternanthera sessilis leaves, Solanum nigrum leaves, Moringa oleifera leaves and Ocimum sanctum leaves) were tested for their ability to inhibit the formation of NDEA from its precursors. Powdered spices and leaf vegetable pastes were added in various concentrations to the nitrosation mixture (25 mM TELA, 100 mM sodium nitrate in 2.5 M sodium dihydrogen phosphate), incubated at 37 deg C for 3 h and the reaction products were centrifuged, separated and the supernatant used for mutagenicity testing against Salmonella typhimurium, tester strain TA 1537. Cumin and poppy seeds significantly inhibited the mutagenicity of the nitrosation products, the effect increasing with increasing concentration. Alternanthera sessilis, Solanum nigrum and Moringa oleifera leaves also exhibited inhibition of mutagenicity.
    Journal article
    Advances in Plant Sciences, 1991, Vol.4, No.1, pp.189-193, 11 ref. | Isotope Division, Cancer Institute, Adyar, Madras 600020, India. | 0970-3586
    Keywords : seeds; composition; leaves; medicinal plants
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19920317287

  • Further studies with plant extracts on root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne javanica ) larvae.
    Krishnamurthy, G. V. G., Murthy, P. S. N. Chari, M. S.; Ramaprasad, G. (ed) 1990

    Plant species (44) belonging to millets, pulses, oilseeds, narcotics, horticultural crops and ornamental plants were tested for nematicidal activity against Meloidogyne javanica as water extracts at dilutions of 1:10, 1:100 and 1:1000. Nicotine and nicotine sulfate were also tested at these dilutions. Observations were taken on larval mortality or otherwise, on 4 consecutive days, by transferring the treated larvae to fresh water daily. The extracts exerted 5 types of responses on the larvae. On this basis, 14 plant species, viz. Sorghum vulgare, Brassica nigra, Nicotiana tabacum, Clerodendron inerme [Clerodendrum inerme ], Catharanthus roseus, Allium sativum, Capsicum annuum, Moringa oleifera, Pongamia glabra [P. pinnata ], Caesalpinia crista, Piper nigrum, Tamarindus indica, Mangifera indica and Chrysanthemum indicum were found to possess higher nematicidal effects than the rest at the 1:10 dilution level, while dilutions of 1:100 and 1:1000 were less effective. In the case of nicotine and nicotine sulfate, all the 3 dilutions showed high nematicidal effects.
    Conference paper
    Botanical pesticides in integrated pest management: Proceedings of National Symposium held on January 21-22, 1990 at Central Tobacco Research Institute, Rajahmundry 533105, India., 1990, pp.438-448, 14 ref. Indian Society of Tobacco Science, Rajahmundry, | Central Tobacco Institute, Rajahmundry 533 105, India. |
    Keywords : Plant parasitic nematodes; Industrial crops; chemical control; Plant extracts; plant nematology
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19932331467

  • Effect of low levels of ambient air pollutants on biochemical constituents of three tree species.
    Krishnayya, N. S. R., Bedi, S. J. 1990

    Azadirachta indica, Moringa pterygosperma [M. oleifera] and Tamarindus indica .
    Journal article
    Indian Journal of Ecology, 1990, Vol.17, No.2, pp.97-100, 12 ref. | Ecology and Environmental Research Laboratory, Department of Botany, M. S. University of Baroda, Baroda 390002, India. | 0304-5250
    Keywords : forest trees; air pollution; plant composition; chemical composition
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19950609721

  • Screening of some indigenous plants for antifungal activity against dermatophytes.
    Misra SK, Sahu, K.C. 1977

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Indian J. Pharmac. 9 (4) 269-272 (1977) | |
    Keywords :
    Location : http://www.ijp-online.com/archives/1977/009/04/r0269-0272ra.pdf |
    Database :

  • Studies on the extractability and chemical composition of leaf proteins from certain trees.
    Mohan, M., Srivastava, G. P. 1981

    Total extractable nitrogen in total N of pulp from tree leaves was Cassia fistula 74, Sesbania grandiflora 59, Gliricidia maculata 57, Morus alba 45, Moringa olifera 37 and Leucaena leucocephala 30%. Extractable protein N was 45, 46, 37, 34, 20 and 18%, dry leaf protein concentrate (LPC) 5.3, 9.4, 3.8, 6.7, 4.0 and 4.3% of fresh pulp, N in dry crude LPC 6.6, 6.9, 7.0, 6.4, 5.4 and 5.0% and protein in dry LPC 41, 43, 44, 40, 34 and 32%, respectively.
    Journal article
    Journal of Food Science and Technology, India, 1981, Vol.18, No.2, pp.48-50, 12 ref. | Dep. Crop Physiology and Biochemistry, Chandra Shekhar Azad Univ. Agriculture and Technology, Kanpur-208 002, India. |
    Keywords : leaf protein; composition
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19811425069

  • Biochemical and physiological alterations in female reproductive organs of cyclic rats treated with aqueous extract of Moringa oleifera Lam.
    Shukla S, Mathur R Prakash AO. 1988

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Acta Eur Fertil. 1988 Jul-Aug;19(4):225-32. | Laboratory of Reproductive Biology School of Studies in Zoology Jiwaji University, India |
    Keywords :
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=3227756&dopt=Abstract |
    Database : Pubmed, 3227756 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Effect of aqueous extract of Moringa oleifera Lam. on the periodicity of oestrous cycle in adult intact rats.
    Shukla, S., Mathur, R. Prakash, A. O. 1987

    The studies confirmed a biphasic action of the aqueous extract of M. oleifera roots on the duration of the oestrous cycle in female rats.
    Journal article
    Indian Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 1987, Vol.49, No.6, pp.218-219, 10 ref. | Jiwaji Univ., Gwalior 474 011, India. | 0250-474X
    Keywords : roots; composition; Medicinal properties
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19880350334

  • Antifertility profile of the aqueous extract of Moringa oleifera roots.
    Shukla, S., Mathur, R. Prakash, A.O. 1988

    In studies with rats, oral doses of root extract showed significant oestrogenic activity. However, when it was administered together with estradiol dipropionate (EDP) the extract progressively antagonized the oestrogenic action of EDP. Some antiprogestational activity was also observed.
    Journal article
    Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 1988, Vol.22, No.1, pp.51-62, 16 ref. | School of Studies in Zoology, Jiwagi Univ., Gwalior 474011, India. | 0378-8741
    Keywords : oral contraceptives; plant extracts
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=3352285&dopt=Abstract |
    Database : AGRICOLA, RS160 J6 CABI, 19880350369 Pubmed, 3352285 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Anti-implantation efficacy of Moringa oleifera Lam. and Moringa concanensis Nimmo in rats.
    Shukla, S., Mathur, R. Prakash, A.O. 1988

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    International journal of crude drug research. Mar 1988. v. 26 (1) p. 29-32. | |
    Keywords : contraceptives; mice
    Location : |
    Database : AGRICOLA, 450 Q22

  • Biochemical alterations in the female genital tract of ovariectomized rats treated with aqueous extract of Moringa oleifera Lam.
    Shukla, S., Mathur, R. et al. 1989

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Pakistan Journal Of Scientific And Industrial Research 32(4): 273-277. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Histoarchitecture of the genital tract of ovariectomized rats treated with an aqueous extract of Moringa oleifera roots
    Shukla, S., Mathur, R. Prakash, A.O. 1989

    Aqueous extracts of the roots are known to have anti-implantation effects.
    Journal article
    Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 1989, Vol.25, No.3, pp.249-261, 23 ref. | Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, School of Studies in Zoology, Jiwaji University, Gwalior 474011, India. | 0378-8741
    Keywords : rats; ovariectomy; plant extracts; contraceptives; medicinal properties; fatty oil plants
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=2747260&dopt=Abstract |
    Database : AGRICOLA, RS160 J6 CABI, 19900396584 Pubmed, PMID: 2747260

  • Evaluation of some plant extracts against Sclerotium rolfsii causing stem rot in tuberose.
    Das, S. R., Pani, B. K. Kar, S. 1997

    Extracts from Adhatoda vasica , Moringa oleifera , Azadirachta indica , Lawsonia inermis , Sapindus trifoliatus , Rauvolfia serpentina , Pongamia glabra [P. pinnata ] and Lantana camara were tested in the laboratory against S. rolfsii [Corticium rolfsii ], the causal agent of stem rot of tuberose (Polianthes tuberosa ). Root extracts of M. oleifera and seed extracts of S. trifoliatus at 10% showed maximum antifungal activity, causing 96.6 and 82.7% growth inhibition of C. rolfsii , respectively.
    Journal article
    Environment and Ecology, 1997, Vol.15, No.4, pp.975-976, 4 ref. | Department of Plant Pathology, Orissa University of Agriculture and Technology, Bhubaneswar 751003, India. | 0970-0420
    Keywords : plant extracts; plant pathogens; fungi; roots; seeds; antifungal agents
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19981004378

  • Glucosinolate composition of seeds from 297 species of wild plants.
    Daxenbichler, M.E., Spencer, G.F. Carlson, D.G. Rose, G.B. Brinker, A.M. Powell, R.G. 1991

    Seed samples from 22 species of the Capparidaceae (eight genera), one Caricaceae, 259 Cruciferae (88 genera), two Moringaceae, three Phytolaccaceae, one Pittosporaceae, six Resedaceae, one Salvadoraceae and two Tropaeolaceae were analysed for total and individual glucosinolate compositions. Glucosinolates with a wide variety of both alkyl and aryl substituents were quantified by GC of their hydrolysis products and, in certain cases, were confirmed by mass spectrometry.
    Journal article
    Phytochemistry, 1991. v. 30 (8) . p. 2623-2638. | |
    Keywords : wild plants; plant composition; glucosinolates; biosynthesis; biochemical pathways
    Location : |
    Database : AGRICOLA, 450 P5622

  • Antibiotic principle of seeds of Moringa oleifera
    Eilert, U., Wolters, B. Nahrstedt, A. 1979

    4-( alpha -L-Rhamnosyloxy)benzyl isothiocyanate from M. oleifera seeds was bactericidal at 56 mu mol/litre against Bacillus subtilis and at 40 mu mol/litre against Mycobacterium phlei.
    Journal article
    Planta Medica, 1979, Vol.39, No.3, p.235, 4 ref. | Institut fur Pharmazeutische Biologie, 3300 Braunschweig, German Federal Republic. | 0032-0943
    Keywords : antibacterial properties; thiocyanates; fatty oil plants; medicinal plants
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19800387156

  • The antibiotic principle of seeds of Moringa oleifera and Moringa stenopetala.
    Eilert, U., Wolters, B. Nahrstedt, A. 1981

    4( alpha -L-Rhamnosyloxy)benzyl isothiocyanate was identified as an active antimicrobial agent from M. oleifera and M. stenopetala seeds. Defatted and shell free seeds of both species contained about 8-10% 4( alpha -L-rhamnosyloxy)benzyl isothiocyanate.
    Journal article
    Planta Medica, 1981, Vol.42, No.1, pp.55-61, 14 ref. | Technische Universitat, D-3300 Braunschweig, German Federal Republic. | 0032-0943
    Keywords : thiocyanates; medicinal properties; fatty oil plants; medicinal plants
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=7255568&dopt=Abstract |
    Database : AGRICOLA, 450 P697 CABI, 19810300966 Pubmed, 7255568 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Antiinflammatory effects of Moringa oleifera root extract.
    Ezeamuzie, I.C., Ambakederemo, A.W. Shode, F.O. Ekwebelem, S.C. 1996

    A crude methanol extract of the root of the plant Moringa oleifera Lam. was screened for anti inflammatory effect using the rat paw edema and the rat 6-day air pouch inflammatory models. Following oral administration, the extract inhibited carrageenan-induced rat paw edema in a dose-dependent manner, with 50% inhibitory concentration - IC (dose producing 50% inhibition) of 660 mg kg. On the 6-day air pouch acute inflammation induced with carrageenan, the extract was much more potent, with IC values of 302.0 mg kg and 315.5 mg kg, for the inhibition of cellular accumulation and fluid exudation, respectively. Maximum inhibition obtained with 600 mg kg were 83.8% and 80.0%, respectively. When delayed (chronic) inflammation was induced in the 6-day air pouch model using Freund's complete adjuvant, the extract was still effective though less than in acute inflammation. In contrast a moderate dose of indomethacin (5 mg kg) inhibited the acute, but not the delayed form of air pouch inflammation. Acute toxicity tests in mice suggest very low toxicity. These results suggest that the root of Moringa oleifera contains anti inflammatory principle(s) that may be useful in the treatment of both the acute and chronic inflammatory conditions.
    Journal article
    International journal of pharmacognosy : a journal of crude drug research.July 1996. v. 34 (3) p. 207-212. | Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University, P.O. Box 24923, Safat 13110, Kuwait. | 0925-1618
    Keywords : roots; plant extracts; medicinal properties; inflammation; skin; antiinflammatory agents
    Location : | Nigeria
    Database : AGRICOLA, RS160 I47 CABI, 19960308260 INIST, 1635

  • [Traditional therapy of dracunculiasis in the state of Bauchi - Nigeria] [Article in French]
    Fabiyi JP, Kela SL Tal KM Istifanus WA. . 1993

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Dakar Med 1993;38(2) | Biological Sciences Programme, Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University Bauchi, Nigeria |
    Keywords :
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=7758381&dopt=Abstract |
    Database : Pubmed, 7758381 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Isolation and structure elucidation of a novel glycoside niazidin from the pods of Moringa oleifera.
    Faizi, S., Siddiqui, B.S. Saleem, R. Noor, F. Husnain, S. 1997

    Studies on the EtOH extract of fresh pods of Moringa oleifera have resulted in the isolation of a novel glycoside niazidin (1) possessing an O-nitrile thiocarbamate group, along with thiocarbamate, carbamate, and isothiocyanate glycosides. Their structures have been determined through spectral studies, including appropriate 2D NMR experiments and chemical reaction. Fatty acid esters, long-chain hydrocarbons, carbamic acid, isocyanates, isothiocyanates, phenolic esters, nitriles, nitrile ester (3), polysulfide sulfinate (4), and a benzyl thiocarbamate (5), along with elemental sulfur (S), have also been identified through GC-MS.
    Journal article
    Journal of natural products.Dec 1997. v. 60 (12) p. 1317-1321. | H.E.J. Research Institute of Chemistry, University of Karachi, Karachi-75270, Pakistan. | 0163-3864
    Keywords : pods; plant composition; glycosides; medicinal properties; antihypertensive agents; phenolic compoun
    Location : | Pakistan
    Database : AGRICOLA, 442.8 L77 CABI, 19980602904 INIST, 4127

  • Isolation and structure elucidation of new nitrile and mustard oil glycosides from Moringa oleifera and their effect on blood pressure.
    Faizi, S., Siddiqui, B.S. Saleem, R. Siddiqui, S. Aftab, K. Gilani, A.H. 1994

    Bioassay-guided analysis of an EtOH extract of M. oleifera leaves (collected from Karachi, Pakistan in Nov. 1990) showing hypotensive activity led to the isolation of 2 nitrile glycosides, niazirin and niazirinin (a new compound), and 3 mustard oil glycosides, 4-[(4'-O -acetyl--L-rhamnosyloxy)benzyl]isothiocyanate (isolated for the first time from this source), and niaziminins A and B. Structural determination was accomplished by means of spectroscopic methods including appropriate 2D NMR experiments and chemical reactions. This is the first report of the isolation of nitriles, an isothiocyanate, and thiocarbamates from the same plant species. The 3 mustard oil glycosides (3 mg/kg, i.v.) showed hypotensive activity in anesthetized rats (35-40% fall in mean arterial blood pressure).
    Journal article
    Journal of natural products.Sept 1994. v. 57 (9) p. 1256-1261. | H.E.J. Research Institute of Chemistry, University of Karachi, Karachi 75270, Pakistan. | 0163-3864
    Keywords : mustard oil; leaves; plant composition; hypertension; medicinal properties; hypotensive agents
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=7798960&dopt=Abstract | Pakistan
    Database : AGRICOLA, 442.8 L77 CABI, 19950300265 INIST, 4127 Pubmed, 7798960 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Fully acetylated carbamate and hypotensive thiocarbamate glycosides from Moringa oleifera.
    Faizi, S., Siddiqui, B.S. Saleem, R. Siddiqui, S. Aftab, K. Gilani, A. 1995

    Six new and three synthetically known glycosides have been isolated from the leaves of Moringa oleifera, employing a bioassay-directed isolation method on the ethanolic extract. Most of these compounds, bearing thiocarbamate, carbamate or nitrile groups, are fully acetylated glycosides, which are very rare in nature. Elucidation of the structures was made using chemical and spectroscopic methods, including 2D NMR techniques. Thiocarbamates showed hypotensive activity.
    Journal article
    Phytochemistry.Mar 1995. v. 38 (4) p. 957-963. | H.E.J. Research Institute of Chemistry, University of Karachi, Karachi 75 270, Pakistan. | 0031-9422
    Keywords : leaves; plant composition; medicinal properties; glycosides; hypotensive activity
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=7766390&dopt=Abstract | Pakistan
    Database : AGRICOLA, 450 P5622 CABI, 19950309869 Ingenta, Online article, DOI (article): 10.1016/S0031-9422(94)00729-D INIST, 9408 Pubmed, 7766390 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Isolation and structure elucidation of novel hypotensive agents, Niazinin A, Niazinin B, Niazimicin and Niaziminin A + B from Moringa oleifera : the first naturally occurring thiocarbamates.
    Faizi, Shaneen, Bina Shaheen Siddiqui Rubeena Saleem Salimuzzaman Siddiqui Khalid Aftab Anwar-Ul-Hassam Gilani 1992

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    JOURNAL OF THE CHEMICAL SOCIETY. PERKIN TRANSACTIONS. I. 1992 , no 23 , pp. 3237 - 3241 | H.E.J. Research Institute of Chemistry University of Karachi, Pakistan |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : INIST, 130C

  • Novel hypotensive agents, Niazimin A, Niamizin B, Niazicin A and Niazicin B from Moringa oleifera : Isolation of first naturally occurring carbamates.
    Faizi, Shaneen, Bina Shaheen Siddiqui Rubeena Saleem Salimuzzaman Siddiqui Khalid Aftab Anwar-Ul-Hassam Gilani 1994

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    JOURNAL OF THE CHEMICAL SOCIETY. PERKIN TRANSACTIONS. I. 1994 , no 20 , pp. 3035 - 3040 | H.E.J. Research Institute of Chemistry University of Karachi, Pakistan |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : INIST, 130C

  • Hypotensive constituents from the pods of Moringa oleifera
    Faizi, Shaneen, Siddiqui, B.S. Saleem, R. Aftab, K. Shaneen, F. Gilani, A. 1998

    Hypotensive activity of the ethanolic and aqueous extracts of Moringa oleifera whole pods and their parts, namely, coat, pulp, and seed was investigated. The activity of the ethanolic extract of both the pods and the seeds was equivalent at the dose of 30 mg kg. The ethyl acetate phase of the ethanolic extract of pods was found to be the most potent fraction at the same dose. Its bioassay-directed fractionation led to the isolation of thiocarbamate and isothiocyanate glycosides which were also the hypotensive principles of the pods as observed in case of Moringa leaves. Two new compounds, O-[2'-hydroxy-3'-(2 -heptenyloxy)]-propyl undecanoate (1) and O-ethyl-4-[( -L-rhamnosyloxy)-benzyl] carbamate (2) along with the known substances methyl p-hydroxybenzoate (3) and -sitosterol have also been isolated in the present studies. The latter two compounds and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde showed promising hypotensive activity. Structures of all these compounds have been deduced by spectroscopy and chemical reactions.
    Journal article
    Planta medica. [ Planta med.. ] 1998 , vol. 64 , no 3 , pp. 225 - 228 | H. E. J. Research Institute of Chemistry, University of Karachi, Karachi 75270, Pakistan. | 0032-0943
    Keywords : plant composition; pods; cardiovascular system; sterols; phenolic compounds; pharmacology
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=9581519&dopt=Abstract | Pakistan
    Database : CABI, 19980306190 INIST, 9624 Pubmed, 9581519 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Anti-inflammatory and antitumor activities of seed extracts of malunggay, Moringa oleifera L. (Moringaceae).
    Guevara, A. P., Vargas, C. Uy, M. 1996

    Seeds of M. oleifera (collected from Bataan and Naga, Philippines) were extracted with distilled ethanol and concentrated under reduced pressure at 40 deg C. The resulting extract was partitioned between hexane, ethylacetate, butanol and water. The solvent fractions were concentrated under reduced pressure. The crude ethanol extracts (3 mg/kg) of dried and green seeds inhibited carrageenan-induced inflammation of the hind paw of mice by 85 and 77%, respectively. The hexane, butanol and water fractions of the crude ethanol extract of dried seeds inhibited inflammation by 77, 34 and 34%, respectively. The ethylacetate fraction caused a 267% increase in inflammation and exhibited toxicity; mice died after oral administration of the fraction. The crude ethanol extract of dried seeds also inhibited the formation of Epstein-Barr virus-early antigen (EBV-EA) induced by 12-O -tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. The extract (100 micro g/ml) inhibited EBV-EA formation by 100% suggesting its antitumour-promoting activity.
    Journal article
    Philippine Journal of Science, 1996, Vol.125, No.3, pp.175-184, 11 ref. | Institute of Chemistry, College of Science, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City, Philippines. | 0031-7683
    Keywords : medicinal plants; seeds; toxicity; antigens; plant extracts; pharmacology
    Location : | Philippines
    Database : CABI, 19970307387

  • First synthesis of an O-glycosylated glucosinolate isolated from Moringa oleifera
    Gueyrard, D., Barillari, J. Iori, R. Palmieri, S. Rollin, P. 2000

    Starting from l-rhamnose, the first synthesis of the major glucosinolate (1) isolated from Moringa oleifera seeds was effected in seven steps.
    Journal article
    Tetrahedron Letters, 2000, vol. 41, no. 43, pp. 8307-8310 | [1]aInstitut de Chimie Organique et Analytique, Universite d'Orleans, BP 6759, F-45067 Cedex 2, Orleans, France | 0040-4039
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : Ingenta, Uncover plus, Online articles, DOI (article): 10.1016/S0040-4039(00)01466-0, SICI (online): 0040-4039414383078309 INIST, 8899B

  • CNS activities of methanolic extract of Moringa oleifera root in mice
    Gupta M., Mazumder U.k. Chakrabarti S. 1999

    Methanolic extract (ME) of the root of Moringa oleifera was tested for possible pharmacological effects on experimental animals. ME potentiated significantly the sleeping time induced by pentobarbitone sodium, diazepam and meprobamate, showed analgesic properties and also potentiated analgesia induced by morphine and pethidine. Pretreatment with ME caused significant protection against strychnine- and leptazol-induced convulsions. The behavioural studies on mice indicate the CNS depressant nature of ME.
    Journal article
    Fitoterapia, 1 June 1999, vol. 70, no. 3, pp. 244-250(7) Elsevier Science | [1]Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Jadavpur University, Calcutta, India | 0367-326X
    Keywords : Anticonvulsant activity; Analgesic activity; Sedative activity; plant extracts; medicinal properties
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19990311111 Ingenta, Online articles, DOI (article): 10.1016/S0367-326X(99)00029-5, SICI (online): 0367-326X703244250 INIST, 16120

  • Anti-epileptic and anti-cancer activity of some indigenous plants.
    Gupta, M., Mazumder, U. K. et al. 1997

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Indian Journal of Physiology and Allied Sciences 51(2): 53-56. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Preliminary studies on the antiviral effects of some indigenous [to India] plant extracts (Berberis floribunda, Azadirachta indica, Moringa oleifera, Cynodon dactylon) on vaccinia virus in vivo.
    Reddy, A. B., Sethi, M. S. 1984

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Annali della Facolt? di Medicina Veterinaria, Messina, 1984, Vol.21, pp.65-76, 8 ref. | |
    Keywords : Antiviral agents; Medicinal plants
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19872291755

  • Antibacterial activity of some higher plants of Chittagong University Campus.
    Singha, P., Begum, J. et al. 1993

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Chittagong University Studies Part II Science 17(1): 97-101. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Contribution ? l'inventaire des plantes m?dicinales des hauts plateaux de Madagascar
    Razafindrambao, R., 1971

    (No abstract)
    Article in book
    IN : Debray, Maurice; Jacquemin, Henri; Razafindrambao, R. - Contribution ? l'inventaire des plantes m?dicinales de Madagascar. ORSTOM, Paris (FR), 1971, p. 49-150, tabl. - (Travaux et Documents de l'ORSTOM (FRA), No 8) | |
    Keywords : therapeutic use; medicinal plant; taxonomy; vernacular name; pharmacopoeia; chemical composition
    Location : | Madagascar
    Database : Horizon, F A14511/1; B CB12/2; M CM 9/1; M A14511/1

  • Plants used against cancer
    Hartwell, J.L., 1967

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    A survey. 1967- 71, Lloydia 30?34 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Ethnotherapeutics of some medicinal plants used as antipyretic agents among the tribals of India.
    Singh, K. K., Kaushal Kumar 1999

    During ethnobotanical surveys and studies among the tribals and aboriginal populations like the Tharu, Kol, Gond, Kharwar and Korwa of Uttar Pradesh, and the Santhal, Paharia, Oraon and Munda of Bihar, India, some valuable and less known information was gathered about the ethnomedicinal plants used as antipyretic agents. Indigenous preparations are widely taken for fever, malarial fever and kala-azar [visceral leishmaniasis]. Some of the less known and effective species recorded for this purpose were Andrographis paniculata , Bacopa monnieri , Boerhavia diffusa , Caesalpinia bonduc , Cissampelos pareira , Cyperus scariosus , Hemidesmus indicus , Limnophila gratioloides , Luffa graveolens , Marsdenia tenacissima , Moringa oleifera , Nyctanthes arbortristis , Vitex negundo , V. peduncularis and Ziziphus nummularia . The ethnomedicinal recipes, mode of administration, dosage, chemical constituents and biological activities of 30 plants are provided.
    Journal article
    Journal of Economic and Taxonomic Botany, 1999, Vol.23, No.1, pp.135-141, 10 ref. | Taxonomy and Biodiversity Division, National Botanical Research Institute, Lucknow - 226 001, India. | 0250-9768
    Keywords : medicinal properties; antipyretics; ethnobotany; antimalarials; antiprotozoal agents
    Location : | India; Uttar Pradesh; Bihar
    Database : CABI, 20000309187

  • A note on screening of Moringa pterygosperma as an antirheumatic agent. Enriched title: Note on screening of Moringa pterygosperma as an antirheumatic agent [Drug plant extracts, veterinary use]
    Singh, S.D., Srivastava, P.N. Mehta, R.K. Ahmad, A. 1976

    An oil-free alcoholic extract of M. pterygosperma [M. oleifera] root bark was found to have significant anti-inflammatory activity in rats, at doses of 500-1000 mg/kg, comparing quite favourably with standard drugs.
    Journal article
    Indian Journal of Animal Sciences, 1976, Vol.46, No.8, pp.452-454, 8 ref. | Coll. Vet. Sci. & Anim. Husbandry, Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh, India. | 0367-8318
    Keywords : pharmaceutical products; roots; bark; Rheumatism; antiinflammatory agents; medicinal plants
    Location : | India
    Database : AGRICOLA, 41.8 IN22 CABI, 19770640556

  • Plantes m?d. du Sahel.
    Fortin, D., Lo, M. Maynart, G. 1990

    (No abstract)
    Book
    CECI/ENDA, 1990 - 280 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • New original botanical proteins : Composition, biological/biophysical effects and interest in care cosmetology
    Freis, O., Moser, P. Danoux, L. Gillon, V. Pauly, M. Pauly, G. 2000

    Proteins and their derivatives constitute a broad field of applications in care cosmetics. We hereby introduce three innovating protein active ingredients of botanical origin: proteins from Hibiscus esculentus seeds, proteins from Bambara pea and native peptides from Moringa oleifera seeds. Their physico-chemical characteristics and their amino acid composition will be described. Evaluation tests, in vitro but also ex vivo or in vivo, have displayed some unique effects, linked to their molecular weight, as well as to their composition: effects of cellular nutrition, skin moisturization, skin tensor, anti-skin ageing. These results enable to consider new applications in care cosmetics.
    Journal article
    S?FW-journal. 2000 , vol. 126 , no 4 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : INIST, 5380

  • A medical pharmacopoeia
    Fuglie, L., 2001

    (No abstract)
    Article in Book
    in Fuglie L. (ed), The Miracle Tree: The multiple attributes of Moringa. CTA, Wageningen / CWS, Dakar. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • In vitro antimalarial activity of six medicinal plants.
    Gbeassor, M., Kedjagni, A. Y. Koumaglo, K. Souza, C. de Agbo, K. Aklikokou, K. Amegbo, K. A. 1990

    Leaf extracts of Annona muricata, Ficus polita, Luffa aegyptiaca, Momordica charantia and Newbouldia laevis and extracts from the twigs and leaves of Moringa pterygosperma [M. oleifera ] were screened for activity against Plasmodium falciparum cultured in vitro. All extracts inhibited growth in a dose-dependent manner. The IC50 values ranged from 12.6 micro g/ml for N. laevis to 68.4 micro g/ml for M. charantia. [For earlier work see Journal of Ethnopharmacology (1989) 25, 115-118].
    Journal article
    Phytotherapy Research, 1990, Vol.4, No.3, pp.115-117, 10 ref. | Facult? des Sciences, Universit? de B?nin, BP 1515, Lom?, Togo. | 0951-418X
    Keywords : medicinal properties; plant extracts; in vitro; Antimalarials; Antiprotozoal agents
    Location : | Togo
    Database : CABI, 19910302760

  • Hypocholesterolemic effects of crude extract of leaf of Moringa oleifera Lam. in high-fat diet fed wistar rats
    Ghasi S., Nwobodo E. Ofili J.O. 2000

    The leaves of Moringa oleifera Lam (Moringaceae) are used by the Indians in their herbal medicine as a hypocholesterolemic agent in obese patients. The scientific basis for their use in hypercholesterolemia was therefore examined. It was found that administration of the crude leaf extract of Moringa oleifera along with high-fat diet decreased the high-fat diet-induced increases in serum, liver, and kidney cholesterol levels by 14.35% (115-103.2 mg /100 ml of serum), 6.40% (9.4-8.8 mg/g wet weight) and 11.09% (1.09-0.97 mg/g wet weight) respectively. The effect on the serum cholesterol was statistically significant. No significant effect on serum total protein was observed. However, the crude extract increased serum albumin by 15.22% (46-53 g/l). This value was also found to be statistically significant. It was concluded that the leaves of Moringa oleifera have definite hypocholesterolemic activity and that there is valid pharmacological basis for employing them for this purpose in India.
    Journal article
    Journal of Ethnopharmacology, January 2000, vol. 69, no. 1, pp. 21-25(5) Elsevier Science | [1]aDepartment of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu, Nigeria | 0378-8741
    Keywords : Hypercholesterolemia; Atherosclerotic events; traditional medicines
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10661880&dopt=Abstract | India
    Database : CABI, 20000307653 Ingenta, Online articles, DOI (article): 10.1016/S0378-8741(99)00106-3, SICI (online): 0378-87416912125 INIST, 18028 Pubmed, 10661880 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Adhesive performance, flammability evaluation and biodegradation study of plant polymer blends
    Ghosh S.N., Maiti S. 1998

    A renewable polymer, collected as gum from a local plant (Moringa oleifera), was dry blended with various rubbers, e.g. natural rubber (NR), nitrile rubber (NBR), chloroprene rubber (CR) and also with different commodity polymers, viz. polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS), and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The plant polymer (PP) was also solution blended with NR and NBR. The adhesive performance of NR, NBR, NR/PP and NBR/PP blends was studied by the 180o peel test. The results were compared with a commercial adhesive (Dhole's rubber solution, India) used as a sealant. Flame retardancy of the plant polymer blends with commodity polymers and rubbers was monitored by limiting oxygen index (LOI) study. Structure-flammability correlations for CR/PP and PVC/PP blends were also reported. Biodegradability of the NR/PP blend was studied by the standard soil burial test and evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as well as optical microscopy.
    Journal article
    European Polymer Journal, May 1998, vol. 34, no. 5, pp. 849-854(6) Elsevier Science | Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, India | 0014-3057
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : Ingenta, Online articles, DOI (article): 10.1016/S0014-3057(97)00203-6, SICI (online): 0014-3057345849854 INIST, 12672

  • Characterization of a flame retardant plant polymer and its influence on the properties of rubber vulcanizate
    Ghosh S.N., Ghosh, A. K. Adhikari, B. Maiti, S. 2000

    A renewable polymer, collected as a gum from a local plant (Moringa Oleifera) was characterized by various techniques viz. solubility, viscosity, IR, elemental analysis etc. It was compounded with various elastomeric systems viz. natural rubber (NR), nitrile rubber (NBR) and chloroprene rubber (CR) in order to judge its compatibility in the base polymers. 200% and 300% moduli, tensile strength, elongation at break (%) and hardness of the vulcanizates were measured. Surface morphology of the tear tensile specimen was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Retention of the above mechanical properties after leaching with boiling acetone for 48 h, with water at 30?C for 48 h and isothermal aging at 100?2?C for 72 h of the samples was also measured. The results were compared with those of a non-polymeric fire retardant additive, SbO, in an identical condition, as the plant polymer has shown potential fire retardant properties. Results indicated that the plant polymer-rubber blends showed, in general, improved retention of tensile properties before and after aging and leaching.
    Journal article
    International journal of polymeric materials. 2000 , vol. 48 , no 1 , pp. 79 - 97 | Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : INIST, 15600

  • A study on the role of neem, haldi, sajina and garlic oil (Nutriderm oil(R)) in pyoderma and infective dermatitis.
    Ghosh, S. K., 1995

    The main ingredients of Nutriderm oil are margosa (neem [Azadirachta indica]), Moringa pterygosperma [M. oleifera ] (sajina), Curcuma longa (haldi) and garlic oils. Seventy patients with impetigo, infective dermatitis, or folliculitis and furunculosis were treated with Nutriderm oil for 2 weeks or only with gentian violet (controls). The percentage cure rate after 2 weeks was 83, 75 and 50%, respectively, compared with only 20% in the controls.
    Journal article
    Indian Journal of Dermatology, 1995, Vol.40, No.2, pp.73-75, 8 ref. | Department of Dermatology, R.G. Kar Medical College, 1 Belgachia Road, Calcutta 700 004, India. | 0019-5154
    Keywords : herbal drugs; medicinal plants; pharmacology; skin diseases; forest trees
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19960311263

  • Pharmacological studies on hypotensive and spasmolytic activities of pure compounds from Moringa oleifera.
    Gilani, A.H., Aftab, K. Suria, A. Siddiqui, S. Salem, R. Siddiqui, B.S. Faizi, S. 1994

    Bioassay directed fractionation of an ethanolic extract of Moringa oleifera (MO) leaves resulted in the isolation of four pure compounds, niazinin A (1), niazinin B (2), niazimicin (3) and niaziminin A + B (4 + 5). Intravenous administration of either one of the compounds (1-10 mg kg) produced hypotensive and bradycardiac effects in anaesthetized rats. Pretreatment of the animals with atropine (1 mg kg) completely abolished the hypotensive and bradycardiac effects of acetylcholine (ACh), whereas cardiovascular responses to the test compounds remained unaltered, ruling out the possible involvement of muscarinic receptor activation. In isolated guinea-pig atria all the compounds (50-150 g mL) produced negative isotropic and chronotropic effects
    Journal article
    PTR. Phytotherapy research. 1994 , vol. 8 , no 2 , pp. 87 - 91 | Department of Pharmacology, Aga Khan University Medical College, Faculty of Health Sciences, Karachi 748000, Pakistan. | 0951-418X
    Keywords : leaves; plant extracts; antihypertensive agents; parasympatholytics
    Location : |
    Database : AGRICOLA, RS164 P59 CABI, 19950304470 INIST, 21695

  • Bioavailability of thiamine, riboflavin and niacin from commonly consumed green leafy vegetables in the rural areas of Andhra Pradesh in India
    Girija V, Sharada D Pushpamma P. 1982

    During 33 days 6 healthy subjects 17 to 20 years old were given a diet low in vitamins for 3 days, a basal diet alone or with 1 or 2 synthetic vitamin tablets for 3 periods of 4 days and then the basal diet alternating with the basal diet and curry prepared from leaves of amaranth (Amaranthus gangeticus), gogu (Hibiscus cannabinus) and drumstick (Moringa oleifera) for periods of 4 days. Bioavailability of thiamin from amaranth and drumstick curry was 58.7 and 61.6%, respectively. Availability of riboflavin from amaranth, gogu and drumstick was 47.1, 45.8 and 51.5% and of niacin 43.9, 45.1 and 39.9%.
    Journal article
    International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research, 1982, Vol.52, No.1, pp.9-13, 7 ref. | Dep. Foods and Nutrition, College of Home Science, Hyderabad - 500 004, Andhra Pradesh, India. | 0300-9831
    Keywords : thiamin; riboflavin; nicotinic acid; vegetables; leaves
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=7085205&dopt=Abstract | India; Andhra Pradesh
    Database : CABI, 19821436109 Pubmed, 7085205 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Toxicity and mutagenicity evaluation of water coagulated with Moringa oleifera seed preparations using fish, protozoan, bacterial, coliphage, enzyme and Ames Salmonella assays.
    Grabow, W., Slabbert, J.L. Morgan, W.S.G. Jahn, S.A.A. 1985

    In rural Sudan, powdered seeds of the tree Moringa oleifera are used to purify drinking water by coagulation. In trials, the powder was toxic to guppies (Poecilia reticulata ), protozoa (Tetrahymena pyriformis ) and bacteria (Escherichia coli ) and it inhibited acetylcholinesterase. It had no effect on coliphages, lactic dehydrogenase or invertase and the equivalent of cotyledon powder up to 1000 mg/litre had no mutagenic effect on Salmonella. Pericarp had no effect. Powdered cotyledon 5 mg/litre affected oxygen uptake of T. pyriformis, 30 to 40 mg/litre disturbed locomotion of guppies and the 96-h LC50 for guppies was 196 mg/litre. Toxic effects may have been due to 4(alpha-L-rhamnosyloxy) benzyl isothiocyanate, a glycosidic mustard oil. The toxin seemed not to be a danger to the health of man, at least not in the concentrations present during the use of the seeds for nutrition, medicine or water purification.
    Journal article
    Water SA, 1985, Vol.11, No.1, pp.9-14, 13 ref. | National Inst. Water Research, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, PO Box 395, Pretoria 0001, South Africa. | 0378-4738
    Keywords : water purification; seeds; toxicity; composition; Medicinal properties; oilseed plants
    Location : |
    Database : AGRICOLA, TD319 A35W3 CABI, 19851468560 Eaudoc, Techn'Eaudoc, 66/46875

  • Composition physico-chimique de quelques graines issues de la flore de l'?le de la R?union [ Papaya carica, Tamarindus indica, Stercula foetida, Adansonia digitata, Ipomea tuberosa, Erythrina indica, Elaeodendron orientale, Mucuna utilis, Moringa oleifera
    Guerere, M., Mondon, J.M. Pajaniaye, A. 1985

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Annales des Falsifications de l'Expertise Chimique et Toxicologique (France) 1985/07-08. - vol. 78, no. 839, p. 281-286 : 5 ref. - inter.: S | Minist?re de l'Economie des Finances et du Budget. Direction de la Consommation et de la R?pression des Fraudes. Saint-Denis. France |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : SESAME, 8600016011770 (INRA - FRANCE); HO915858 (CIRAD - FRANCE)

  • An antitumor promoter from Moringa oleifera Lam.
    Guevara A.P., Vargas C. Sakurai H. Fujiwara Y. Hashimoto K. Maoka T. Kozuka M. Ito Y. Tokuda H. Nishino H. 1999

    In the course of studies on the isolation of bioactive compounds from Philippine plants, the seeds of Moringa oleifera Lam. were examined and from the ethanol extract were isolated the new O-ethyl-4-( -l-rhamnosyloxy)benzyl carbamate (1) together with seven known compounds, 4( -l-rhamnosyloxy)-benzyl isothiocyanate (2), niazimicin (3), niazirin (4), -sitosterol (5), glycerol-1-(9-octadecanoate) (6), 3-O-(6'-O-oleoyl- -d-glucopyranosyl)- -sitosterol (7), and -sitosterol-3-O- -d-glucopyranoside (8). Four of the isolates (2, 3, 7, and 8), which were obtained in relatively good yields, were tested for their potential antitumor promoting activity using an in vitro assay which tested their inhibitory effects on Epstein-Barr virus-early antigen (EBV-EA) activation in Raji cells induced by the tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA). All the tested compounds showed inhibitory activity against EBV-EA activation, with compounds 2, 3 and 8 having shown very significant activities. Based on the in vitro results, niazimicin (3) was further subjected to in vivo test and found to have potent antitumor promoting activity in the two-stage carcinogenesis in mouse skin using 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) as initiator and TPA as tumor promoter. From these results, niazimicin (3) is proposed to be a potent chemo-preventive agent in chemical carcinogenesis.
    Journal article
    Mutation Research/Genetic Toxicology and Environmental Mutagenesis, 6 April 1999, vol. 440, no. 2, pp. 181-188(8) E lsevier Science | Institute of Chemistry, College of Science, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City, Philippines | 1383-5718
    Keywords : Antitumor promoter; Two-stage carcinogenesis; Epstein-Barr virus-early antigen activation
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10209341&dopt=Abstract | Philippines
    Database : CABI, 19990309663 Ingenta, Online articles, DOI (article): 10.1016/S1383-5718(99)00025-X, SICI (online): 1383-57184402181188 INIST, 12206H Pubmed, 10209341 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Effects of Moringa oleifera Lam. on the reproductive potential of mice
    Herrera, A., 2001

    (No abstract)
    Conference paper
    20th Annual Conference of PAASE, UC-Berkeley, July 5-8, 2001 | Institute of Biology. College of Science. UP Diliman. Herrera@Edsamail.com.ph |
    Keywords :
    Location : http://www.paase.org/paase-program.doc |
    Database :

  • Histological study of the anti-tumor promoting activity of Moringa oleifera Lam.
    Herrera, A., 2001

    (No abstract)
    Conference paper
    20th Annual Conference of PAASE, UC-Berkeley, July 5-8, 2001 | Institute of Biology. College of Science. UP Diliman. Herrera@Edsamail.com.ph |
    Keywords :
    Location : http://www.paase.org/paase-program.doc |
    Database :

  • Moringa: Nature's Medicine Cabinet
    Holst, S., 2000

    (No abstract)
    Book
    Sierra Sunrise Books, USA | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Carbohydrates X. Hydrolysis products of the gum from drumstick plants
    Ingle, T.R., Bhide, B.V. 1962

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    J. Indian Chem. Soc. 39:623-627 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Induction of direct somatic embryogenesis from immature zygotic embryos and callogenesis from epicotyl explants of Moringa pterygosperma Gaertn.
    Iyer, R. I., Gopinath, P. M. 1999

    Direct somatic embryogenesis was obtained in immature zygotic embryos of Moringa pterygosperma [M. oleifera ] cultured in continuous light in media with GA3, BA and activated charcoal. Long term, fast-growing callus cultures were established from rapidly elongating epicotyls of in vitro plantlets of Moringa in media with 2,4-D, NAA and coconut milk.
    Journal article
    Journal of Phytological Research, 1999, Vol.12, No.1/2, pp.17-20, 17 ref. | Department of Genetics, University of Madras, Taramani, Chennai 600 133, India. | 0970-5767
    Keywords : plant embryos; in vitro culture; medicinal plants; antibacterial plants; oilseed plants; plant growt
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 20001617621

  • Plant foods in the management of diabetes mellitus: vegetables as potential hypoglycaemic agents.
    Kalpana Platel, Srinivasan, K. 1996

    This paper reviews data from animal and human studies on vegetables tried as dietary adjuncts for the treatment of diabetes. The review focuses on bitter gourd (Momordica charantia ) and ivy gourd (Coccinia grandis ), but also considers the hypoglycaemic effects of cabbage, lettuce, drumstick (Moringa olifera ), mustard, fenugreek, haricot beans (Phaseolus vulgaris ), cluster beans (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba ), green beans (Vigna radiata ), potatoes and turnips.
    Journal article
    Nahrung, 1997, Vol.41, No.2, pp.68-74, 53 ref. | Department of Biochemistry and Nutrition, Central Food Technological Research Institute, Mysore-570 013, India. | 0027-769X
    Keywords : hypoglycaemic agents; hyperglycaemia; diabetes
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19971407953

  • Preliminary studies on the inorganic constituents of some indigenous hypoglycaemic herbs on oral glucose tolerance test.
    Kar, A., Choudhary, B. K. et al. 1999

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Journal of Ethnopharmacology 64(2): 179-184. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Exochitinase activity in the pharate pupal cuticle of the moringa pest, Eupterote mollifera and the coconut pest, Oryctes rhinoceros
    Karaiyan, K., Thangaraj, T. 1999

    Exochitinase activity in the pharate pupal cuticle of moringa pest, Eupterote mollifera and the coconut pest, Oryctes rhinoceros has been partially purfied through gel chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Fractions isolated in the gel chromatography have been localized using SDS-PAGE and their molecular weights were determined. Characteristics of the partially purified enzymes have been studied.
    Journal article
    Indian journal of entomology. 1999 , vol. 61 , no 3 , pp. 226 - 235 Entomological Society of India, New Delhi, India | Department of Biotechnology, Kongunadu Arts and Science College, Coimbatore-641 029, India. | 0367-8288
    Keywords : enzymes; insect pests; plant pests; animal cuticle
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 20003023863 INIST, 7233

  • Un rem?de pop. S?n. : le n?b?day (Moringa oleifer LA.) Emploi th?rap. en milieu afr. Chimie et Pharmac.
    Kerharo, J., 1969

    (No abstract)
    Article in book
    In : "Plantes m?dicinales - Phytother", 1969, 3 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • A new leucoanthocyanin from Moringa oleifera gum
    KHARE G. C., SINGH V. GUPTA P. C. 1997

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Journal of the Indian Chemical Society. 1997 , vol. 74 , no 3 , pp. 247 - 248 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : INIST, 556

  • Isothiocyanates in myrosinase-treated seed extracts of Moringa peregrina.
    Kjaer, A., Malver, O. El-Menshawi, B. Reisch, J. 1979

    M. peregrina seed, treated with myrosinase, produced 2-propyl, 2-butyl and 2-methylpropyl isothiocyanate in addition to 5,5-dimethyl-oxazolidine-2-thione, all new to the family but known as natural derivatives from other sources. 4-(4'-O-Acetyl- alpha -L-rhamnosyloxy)benzyl isothiocyanate (not previously described) together with substantial quantities of its non-acetylated counterpart, earlier recognized as a component in hydrolysed seeds of M. oleifera, constituted the additional mustard oils observed in M. peregrina seeds.
    Journal article
    Phytochemistry, 1979, Vol.18, No.9, pp.1485-1487, 11 ref. | Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Lyngby, Denmark. | 0031-9422
    Keywords : seeds; thiocyanates; fatty oil plants
    Location : |
    Database : AGRICOLA, 450 P5622 CABI, 19790377105

  • Frequently used ethno-medicinal plants of Bihar.
    Kumar, K., Goel, A. K. 1999

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Journal of Economic and Taxonomic Botany. [print] September 23(2): 645-649. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Screening of plant species for inhibition of bacterial population of raw water
    Kumar, Sheo, Gopal, K. 1999

    Seven plant species i.e., Adhatoda vasica, Andrographis paniculata, Azadirachta indica, Lawsonia inermis, Moringa oleifera, Ocimum sanctum and Trigonella foenum-graecum have been screened out systematically for their effectiveness in inhibition of bacterial population of raw water (in vitro) at variable pH level i.e., 6.0, 6.5, 7.0, 7.5 and 8.0. Maximum percentage inhibition was observed in three plant species at 6.5 pH level while in four plant species at 7.0 pH level. Among all the studied plants, maximum inhibition was recorded in case of L. inermis (93.97%) which was followed by M. oleifera (89.72%) and A. vasica (81.75%). In order of maximum to minimum inhibition, individual plant species depicted their effectiveness in the following manner : L. inermis>M. oleifera>A. vasica>A. indica>O. sanctum>A. paniculata>T. foenum-graecum. Besides, MPN coliform and E. coli were also inhibited maximum at 7.0 pH level by the extract of L. inermis which was followed by A. vasica and M. oleifera at 6.5 pH level. Hence, these plant species may be used for elimination of bacterial contaminants of raw drinking water obtained directly from the sources to reduce the occurrence of different water borne diseases.
    Journal article
    Journal of environmental science and health. Part A, Environmental scienceand engineering. 1999 , vol. 34 , no 4 , pp. 975 - 98 | Aquatic Toxicology Division, Industrial Toxicology Research Centre, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226001, U.P., India. |
    Keywords : plant extracts; medicinal plants; antibacterial properties; water purification
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19990306440 Eaudoc, Techn'Eaudoc, 02/00864 INIST, 15710A

  • Anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective activities of fruits of Moringa pterygosperma Gaertn.
    Kurma, S. R., Mishra, S. H. 1998

    The powder and different extracts of fruits of M. pterygosperma [M. oleifera ], obtained from a local market in India and traditionally used to treat ascites, rheumatism, and liver and spleen diseases, were screened for their antiinflammatory and hepatoprotective activities in albino rats. The aqueous extract showed significant antiinflammatory activity against carrageenan-induced paw oedema. It also showed significant hepatoprotective activity against CCl4- and paracetamol-induced hepatic damage. The methanolic extract was effective against rifampicin-induced toxicity on the liver.
    Journal article
    Indian Journal of Natural Products, 1998, Vol.14, No.1, pp.3-10, 14 ref. | Pharmacy Department, Faculty of Technology and Engineering, M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara 390001, India. |
    Keywords : fruits; medicinal plants; plant extracts; rifampicin; toxicity
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19990305692

  • Hepatoprotective principles from the stem bark of Moringa pterygosperma.
    Kurma, S.R., Mishra, S.H. 1998

    Studies on the hepatoprotective activity of different extracts of stem bark of M. pterygosperma [M. oleifera ] (obtained from a local market in India) was carried out in albino rats. The total aqueous extract showed hepatoprotective action against carbon tetrachloride- and rifampicin-induced hepatotoxicities. The petroleum ether extract exhibited similar activity against paracetamol-induced hepatotoxicity. Caffeic and fumaric acids, isolated for the first time from the bioactive total aqueous extract, were characterized and assessed for their in vitro hepatoprotective activity. These showed significant hepatoprotective activity against galactosamine- and thioacetamide-induced hepatic cytotoxicities.
    Journal article
    Pharmaceutical biology.Oct 1998. v. 36 (4) p. 295-300. | Pharmacy Dept., Faculty of Technology & Engineering, Kalabhavan, P.B. 51, M.S. Univ. Baroda, Vadodara 390001, Gujarat, India. |
    Keywords : stems; bark; plant extracts; cytotoxicity; hepatotoxicity; phenolic compounds;
    Location : |
    Database : AGRICOLA, RS160 I47 CABI, 19990301460 INIST, 1635

  • Antibiotic principles from Moringa pterygosperma
    Kurup, P.A., Rao, P.L. 1950

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Curr. Sci. 19:43 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Medicinal and poisonous plants of the tropics. Proceedings of symposium 5-35 of the 14th International Botanical Congress, Berlin, 24 July-1 August 1987.
    Leeuwenberg, A. J. M., 1988

    Eighteen papers were presented at this symposium held on 30 July 1987. The papers cover a range of topics including past, present and future research on medicinal and poisonous plants of the tropics; medicinal plants in China, Zimbabwe, Kenya, Peru, the West Indies, Mozambique, Philippines, Mexico and India; plants as sources of antimalarial and amoebicidal compounds; volatile constituents of Piper betle cultivars; medicinal value of Moringa oleifera ; and glycoside formation in Digitalis lanata leaves.
    Conference paper
    Medicinal and poisonous plants of the tropics. Proceedings of symposium 5-35 of the 14th International Botanical Congress, Berlin, 24 July-1 August 1987., 1988, 152 pp. Pudoc, Wageningen, Netherlands | | 90-220-0921-1
    Keywords : Glycosides; Medicinal plants; Plant extracts; Antiprotozoal agents; Poisonous plants; parasites
    Location : | China; Zimbabwe; Kenya; Peru; Mozambique; Philippi
    Database : CABI, 19910307928

  • Nematicidal properties of root extracts of seventeen plant species on Meloidogyne incognita.
    Lei Thi Hoan, Davide, R. G. 1979

    Extracts of 17 plant species were prepared by collecting root sap from a press (15 000 lb/cm3) and centrifuging off the supernatant. All extracts significantly reduced egg hatch of Meloidogyne incognita. 14 were significantly more active than DBCP at 300 ppm and 8 completely suppressed egg hatch. Root invasion and nematode development on tomatoes was completely suppressed by extracts of 6 species and DBCP at 150 and 300 ppm. Egg mass immersion for 4 days in 1:10, 1:100 and 1:1000 dilutions of root extracts was progressively less effective in reducing subsequent infectivity, though at 1:10 dilution the extract of 3 species, Moringa pterygosperma, Tagetes erecta and Mimosa pudica were more effective in reducing root invasion of tomatoes by M. incognita larvae than DBCP at 300 ppm.
    Journal article
    Philippine Agriculturist, 1979, Vol.62, pp.285-295, 16 ref. | Coll. of Agric., Univ. of the Philippines at Los Banos, Coll., Laguna, Brazil. | 0031-7454
    Keywords : plant extracts; nematicides; plant nematology
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19810880114

  • Synthesis of active principles from the leaves of Moringa oleifera using S-pent-4-enyl thioglycosides.
    Leuck, M., Kunz, H. 1998

    alpha-L-Rhamnosides of 4-hydroxy-benzyl compounds with nitrile, carbamate, and thiocarbamate groups occurring in Moringa oleifera leaf extracts and the alpha-L-rhamnoside of anisaldehyde derivatives were synthesised. Electrophilic activation of S-pent-4-enyl thiorhamnosides was applied for the construction of glycosidic linkages.
    Journal article
    Carbohydrate Research, November 1998, vol. 312, no. 1, pp. 33-44(12) Elsevier Science | Institut fur Organische Chemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitat Mainz, Johann-Joachim-Becher-Weg 18-20, D-55128, Mainz, Germany | 0008-6215
    Keywords : Glycosides; Medicinal plants; Plant extracts; Antiprotozoal agents; Poisonous plants; parasites
    Location : |
    Database : AGRICOLA, 385 C172 CABI, 19990309007 Ingenta, Online articles, DOI (article): 10.1016/S0008-6215(98)00223-7, SICI (online): 0008-621531213344 INIST, 12339

  • Cardiovascular effects of the aqueous extract of Moringa pterygosperma.
    Limaye, D.A., Nimbkar, A.Y. Jain, R. Ahmad, M. 1995

    The aqueous extract of stem bark of Moriga pterygosperma (Family Moraingaceae) was investigated for its effect on various pharmacological parameters. In cardiovascular profile at lower concentrations (1-10 ng) it produced a dose dependent positive inotropic effect (n = 3, 1.29 ? 0.021 for 10 ng) and at higher concentrations (0.1-1 g) a dose dependent negative inotropic effect (n = 3,0.53 ? 0.033 for 1 g) on the isolated frog heart. It also a dose dependent hypotensive effect on dog blood pressure (n = 3, 82 ? 0.98 for 20 mg kg). It failed to elicit any effect on isolated guinea-pig ileum, rat stomach fundus or frog rectus abdominis muscle
    Journal article
    Phytotherapy research : PTR.Feb 1995. v. 9 (1) p. 37-40. | Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881, USA. | 0951-418X
    Keywords : stems; bark; plant extracts; cardiovascular agents; antihypertensive agents
    Location : | India
    Database : AGRICOLA, RS164 P59 CABI, 19950306151 INIST, 21695

  • Hypoglycaemic effect of Moringa stenopetala aqueous extract in rabbits.
    Makonnen, E., Hunde, A. Damecha, G. 1997

    The hypoglycaemic effect of Moringa stenopetala extract was assessed in nondiabetic rabbits by blood glucose analysis. In vivo experiments were carried out in rabbits that received the test material and the standard, glibenclamide. The plant extract, although less potent than glibenclamide, was found to lower blood glucose concentration. The hypoglycaemic effect was observed to increase with time and with an increase in the dose of the extract.
    Journal article
    Phytotherapy research : PTR.Mar 1997. v. 11 (2) p. 147-148. | Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Addis Ababa University, PO Box 9086, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. | 0951-418X
    Keywords : medicinal plants; hypoglycemic agents; rabbits; blood sugar; leaves; plant extracts
    Location : | Ethiopia
    Database : AGRICOLA, RS164 P59 AGRIS, 97-102288 CABI, 19970304807 INIST, 21695

  • Herbal medicine in livestock and poultry production.
    Mateo, C. D., Landicho, E. F.; Maala, C. P.; Mateo, A. A. B.; Vilacorte, E. Z. V. (ed) 1992

    The paper presents the findings of a questionnaire study on the utilization of medicinal plants for animal health care in the northern and southern parts of the Philippines. The method of preparation and administration, approximate dosage, indications and species treated are listed for 35 medicinal plants.
    Conference paper
    Proceedings 8th Congress of the Federation of Asian Veterinary Associations, 21-25 November 1992, The Manila Hotel Manila, Philippines., 1992, pp.783-792, 5 ref. Philippine Veterinary Medical Association, Quezon City, Philippines | | 971-91326-0-4
    Keywords : animal diseases; treatment; therapy; poultry; medicinal plants
    Location : | Philippines
    Database : CABI, 19952215162

  • Documentation on the uses of Moringa stenopetala and its possible antileishmanial and antifertility effects.
    Mekonnen, Y., Gessesse, A. 1998

    A study of the uses of Moringa stenopetala in Arbaminch and surrounding villages and the Wollayeta Sodo area in southern Ethiopia showed that the fresh leaves are eaten as a vegetable. The leaves and the roots are also used for treating various diseases. According to the practice of the local people, the leaves boiled in water can be used in curing malaria, hypertension and stomach pain. They sometimes use the leaves to expel the retained placenta in pregnant women. The roots chopped and mixed with water are used mainly for malaria treatment. Crude ethanol extracts of leaves and roots were tested separately on Leishmania donovani MHOM/ET/89/IPB 399 promastigotes. The serially diluted crude extracts produced abnormal morphologies of the promastigotes after 48 h of incubation. The dilutions used were high. The antifertility effect of the leaf ethanol extract in Swiss albino mice was found to be 73.3%, assuming mating to be 100%.
    Journal article
    Sinet, an Ethiopian Journal of Science, 1998, Vol.21, No.2, pp.287-295, 20 ref. | Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Addis Ababa University, PO Box 1176, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. | 0379-2897
    Keywords : medicinal plants; malaria; hypertension; pregnancy; traditional medicine; antiprotozoal agents
    Location : | Ethiopia
    Database : CABI, 19990803037

  • Effects of ethanol extract of Moringa stenopetala leaves on guinea-pig and mouse smooth muscle.
    Mekonnen, Y., 1999

    The fresh leaf ethanol (LE) extract of Moringa stenopetala was tested in guinea-pig ileum and mouse duodenum and in uterus strips. There were significant dose and time dependent reductions of the acetylcholine (AC) response with initial stimulatory effects in both the guinea-pig ileum and the mouse duodenum preparations. Spontaneous rhythmic contractions were greatly reduced, suggesting an antispasmodic property of the crude LE extract. The LE extract showed some oxytocic activity on uterus strips of guinea-pigs and mice. The results are indicative of the traditional use of the leaves of Moringa stenopetala for stomach pain and to expel retained placentae by women.
    Journal article
    Phytotherapy research : PTR.Aug 1999. v. 13 (5) p. 442-444. | Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Addis Ababa University, P. O.Box 1176, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. | 0951-418X
    Keywords : medicinal properties; mice; guinea pigs; antispasmodic property; oxytocic activity; plant extracts
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10441791&dopt=Abstract | Ethiopia
    Database : AGRICOLA, RS164 P59 CABI, 19990311428 INIST, 21695 Pubmed, 10441791 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • In vitro antitrypanosomal activity of Moringa stenopetala leaves and roots.
    Mekonnen, Y., Yardley, V. Rock, P. Croft, S. 1999

    The leaves and the root extracts of Moringa stenopetala were tested in vitro against trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi and L. donovani amastigotes. The fresh root wood ethanol extract and the dried leaves acetone extract were found to be active against T. brucei with an ED value of 9.2 g mL and 10.0 g mL respectively. All the other extracts were inactive against all the tested parasite forms.
    Journal article
    Phytotherapy research : PTR.Sept 1999. v.13 (6) p. 538-539. | Department of Biology, Addis Ababa University, P.O. Box 1176, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. | 0951-418X
    Keywords : plant extracts; antimicrobial properties; leaves; roots; medicinal plants; antiprotozoal agents
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10479771&dopt=Abstract | Ethiopia
    Database : AGRICOLA, RS164 P59 CABI, 19990312222 INIST, 21695 Pubmed, 10479771 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Isolation and structure elucidation of moringyne: A new glycoside from seeds of Moringa oleifera.
    Memon, G. M., Memon, S. A. et al. 1985

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Pakistan Journal Of Scientific And Industrial Research 28(1): 7-9. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Traditional medicine in the treatment of parasitic diseases in the Philippines.
    Monzon, R. B., 1995

    Parasitic diseases are a continuing public health problem in the Philippines. Soil-transmitted helminthiases (ascariasis, trichuriasis, etc) are the most prevalent especially among children. Other major parasitic infections that cause significant mortality and morbidity in the population are malaria, lymphatic filariasis and schistosomiasis. Since these parasitic infections are more prevalent in the rural areas of the country, traditional drugs (medicinal plants) have evolved for some of them. These have been passed on through folkloric tradition and are propagated by traditional medicine men known as herbolarios . It is essential that these alternative chemotherapeutic agents be scientifically tested in order to ensure their safety and effectivity for the human population that depends on such. Among the plants that have been identified to have antihelminthic properties are: Anona reticulata (custard apple), Areca catechu (areca of betelnut palm), Quisqualis indica ( niyog-niyogan or Chinese honeysuckle), Leucaena leucocephala ( ipil-ipil ), Carica papaya (papaya), Cassia alata ( alapulko or ringworm bush) and Ananas comosus ( pinya or pineapple). The only suspected antiprotozoal drug is an antimalarial - Alstonia scholaris ( dita or Australian quinine bark). There are also traditional drugs claimed to be effective against parasitic infestations (scabies andpediculosis) such as: Melaleuca leucadendron (cajeput oil tree), Tinospora crispa ( makabuhay ), Phyllanthus nirui ( sampasampalukan or egg woman), Cissampelos pareira ( sinsaw-sinsawan ), Moringa oleifera ( malunggay or horse-radish tree), Gliricidia sepium ( kakawati ), Cassia alata ( akapulko or ringworm bush), Plumeria acutifolia ( kalatsutsi or frangipani) and Anona squamosa ( atis or custard apple). In vitro and in vivo laboratory trials always precede human clinical trials due to ethical guidelines. Plants with antihelminthic potential may be screened in vivo indirectly, by observing their effects on animals infected with parasites that are taxonomically and physiologically similar to their human counterparts. In vitro studies are also possible with larger species such as Ascaris lumbricoides which can be maintained in physiological solutions and attached to kymograms. Antimalarial properties may be tested in vivo using the Plasmodium berghei - mouse model (Yoeli, 1965) or in vitro using Trager and Jensen's (1976) continuous culture method for P. falciparum. Traditional drugs for the treatment of parasitic diseases should be explored and developed since they are cheaper and more accessible to the rural poor who have the greatest need for medical treatment. Likewise, they may offer an alternative solution to the emerging problem of drug resistance which is a common phenomenon especially among the synthetic and more expensive Western drugs that developing countries have become dependent on.
    Journal article
    SOUTHEAST ASIAN JOURNAL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE AND PUBLIC HEALTH. 1995 , vol. 26 , no 3 , pp. 421 - 428 | DEPARTMENTS OF PARASITOLOGY, COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH, UNIVERSITY OF THE PHILIPPINES |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : INIST, 19778

  • A study on the crude antidiabetic drugs used in Arabian folk medicine.
    Mossa, J. S., 1985

    The geographical distribution (in Saudi Arabia), known chemical constituents, plant parts used, folk medicinal uses, and hypoglycaemic effects in mice of 12 plant species are tabulated. Aqueous extracts of Hammada salicornica, Teucrium oliverianum and Allium cepa decreased blood glucose levels by > 25% and extracts of Artemisia abyssinica, Azadirachta indica and Loranthus curviflorus decreased levels by 11-24%. Moringa oleifera increased blood glucose levels by 15%. The other 5 species showed no significant activity.
    Journal article
    International Journal of Crude Drug Research, 1985, Vol.23, No.3, pp.137-145, 27 ref. | King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia. | 0167-7314
    Keywords : plant; composition; Medicinal properties; vegetables
    Location : | Saudi Arabia
    Database : CABI, 19860337923

  • Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis of genetic variation in Moringa oleifera Lam.
    Muluvi, G.M., Sprent, J.I. Soranzo, N. Provan, J. Odee, D. Folkard, G. McNicol, J.W. Powell, W. 1999

    Moringa oleifera is an important multipurpose tree introduced to Africa from India at the turn of this century. Despite limited knowledge of the levels of genetic diversity and relatedness of introduced populations, their utilization as a source of seed for planting is widespread. In order to facilitate reasoned scientific decisions on its management and conservation and prepare for a selective breeding programme, genetic analysis of seven populations was performed using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. The four pairs of AFLP primers (PstI/MseI) generated a total of 236 amplification products of which 157 (66.5%) were polymorphic between or within populations. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed significant differences between regions and populations, even though outcrossing perennial plants are expected to maintain most variation within populations. A phenetic tree illustrating relationships between populations suggested at least two sources of germplasm introductions to Kenya. The high levels of population differentiation detected suggest that provenance source is an important factor in the conservation and exploitation of M. oleifera genetic resources.
    Journal article
    Molecular Ecology, March 1999, vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 463-470(8) Blackwell Science Ltd, Oxford, UK | MULUVI G.M. [3]; SPRENT J.I. [2]; SORANZO N. [3]; PROVAN J. [3]; ODEE D. [1]; FOLKARD G. [4]; McNICOL J.W. [5]; POWELL W. [3]; Powell [*] [1] Biotechnology Division, Kenya Forestry Research Institute, PO Box 20412, Nairobi, Kenya, [2] Department of Biolog | 0962-1083
    Keywords : amplified fragment length; polymorphism; conservation; genetic variation
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10199008&dopt=Abstract | Tamil nadu; Malawi; Kenya
    Database : AGRICOLA, QH540 M64 AGRIS, 1999-055512 CABI, 19991604968 Ingenta, Online articles, SICI (online): 0962-108383463470 Pubmed, 10199008 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

  • Niaziminin, a thiocarbamate from the leaves of Moringa oleifera, holds a strict structural requirement for inhibition of tumor-promoter-induced Epstein-Barr virus activation.
    Murakami, A., Kitazono, Y. Jiwajinda, S. Koshimizu, K. Ohigashi, H. 1998

    Three known thiocarbamate (TC)- and isothiocyanate (ITC)-related compounds have been isolated from the leaves of Moringa oleifera, a traditional herb in southeast Asia, as inhibitors of tumor promoter teleocidin B-4-induced Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) activation in Raji cells. Interestingly, only niaziminin among 10 TCs including 8 synthetic ones showed considerable inhibition against EBV activation. The structure-activity relationships indicated that the presence of an acetoxy group at the 4'-position of niaziminin is important and indispensable for inhibition. On the other hand, among the ITC-related compounds, naturally occurring 4-[(4'-O-acetyl- -L-rhamnosyloxy)benzyI]ITC and commercially available allyl- and benzyl-ITC significantly inhibited activation, suggesting that the isothiocyano group is a critical structural factor for activity.
    Journal article
    Planta medica.May 1998. v. 64 (4) p. 319-323. | Department of Biotechnological Science, Faculty of Biology-Oriented Science and Technology, Japan | 0032-0943
    Keywords : carbamates; leaves; plant composition; epstein-barr virus; isothiocyanates; medicinal plants
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=9619112&dopt=Abstract | Thailand
    Database : AGRICOLA, 450 P697 CABI, 19980307509 INIST, 9624 Pubmed, 9619112 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of some medicinal plants.
    Muruganandan, S.., Srinivasan, K. Tandan, S. K. Jawahar Lal Suresh Chandra Raviprakash, V 2001

    The antiinflammatory and analgesic activities of 70% ethanolic extracts of some medicinal plants (Aegle marmelos, Butea frondosa [Butea monosperma ], Delonix regia, Eugenia jambolana [Syzygium cumini ], Moringa oleifera, Pinus longifolia [Pinus roxburghii ], Pongamia pinnata and Psidium guajava collected from Uttar Pradesh, India) were investigated in rats using the carrageenin-induced hind paw oedema model. Extracts which exhibited antiinflammatory activity were screened for analgesic activity using the Randall-Selitto method in rats. The extracts were administered at a dose of 300 mg/kg, p.o. Aspirin (300 mg/kg, p.o.) was employed as the reference drug. D. regia bark and Pongamia pinnata seeds showed significant antiinflammatory activity with percentage inhibitions of 70.95 and 64.91, respectively. Psidium guajava leaves, A. marmelos bark and D. regia flowers also showed significant antiinflammatory activity with percentage inhibitions of 39.93, 34.82 and 58.27%, respectively. When analgesic activity was tested using the paw pressure test (measured as pain threshold pressure in g), Pongamia pinnata seeds and leaves (166.67 plus or minus 14.58 and 162.50 plus or minus 19.05) and E. jambolana bark produced significant analgesic effects at 1 and 3 h after administration. The bark (135.83 plus or minus 14.78) and flowers (160.00 plus or minus 23.90) of D. regia significantly increased the pain threshold at 1 h after administration but failed to show analgesia at 3 h (109.16 plus or minus 13.68 and 115.20 plus or minus 17.60, respectively).
    Journal article; Conference paper
    Journal of Medicinal and Aromatic Plant Sciences, 2001, Vol.22/23, No.4A/1A, pp.56-58, 5 ref. Central Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Lucknow, India | Ed: Sushil Kumar; Hasan, S. A.; Samresh Dwivedi; Kukreja, A. K.; Ashok Sharma; Singh, A. K.; Srikant Sharma; Rakesh Tewari Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar-243 122, India. | 0253-7125
    Keywords : bark; flowers; inflammation; leaves; non-wood forest products; plant extracts
    Location : | India; Uttar Pradesh
    Database : CABI, 20013067626

  • Survey on indigenous medicinal plants used for abortion in some districts of Uttar Pradesh.
    Nath, D., Sethi, N. et al. 1997

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Fitoterapia 68(3): 223-225. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Commonly use Indian abortifacient plants with special reference to their teratologic effects in rats.
    Nath, D., Sethi, N. Singh, R.K. Jain, A.K. 1992

    A survey programme was organised in Lucknow and Farrukhabad, two towns of Uttar Pradesh, from March 1987 to July 1987. During the survey, the common folk medicine plants used by women were recorded and Ayurvedic and Unani drug encyclopedias were consulted for the antireproductive potential of these plants. Aqueous or 90% ethanol extracts of the plants of interest were studied in rats orally dosed for 10 days after insemination with special reference to effects on foetal development. Leaf extracts of Moringa oleifera and Adhatoda vasica were 100% abortive at doses equivalent to 175 mg/kg of starting dry material. Only the flowers of Acacia arabica and Hibiscus rosa-sinensis appeared to lack teratologic potential at the doses tested.
    Journal article
    Journal of ethno-pharmacology. Apr 1992. v. 36 (2) p. 147-154. | Division of Toxicology, Central Drug Research Institute, Post Box No. 173, Lucknow 226001, India. | 0378-8741
    Keywords : medicinal plants; rats; induced abortion; plant extracts; teratogenesis
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=1608272&dopt=Abstract | India
    Database : AGRICOLA, RS160 J6 CABI, 19930319285 INIST, 18028 Pubmed, 1608272 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Pharmacological studies on some indigenous drugs reputed for wound healing activity. [Abstract of thesis].
    Nauriyal, M. M., 1985

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Veterinary Research Journal, 1982, Vol.5, No.2, pp.141-142 | |
    Keywords : Medicinal plants; Wound treatment
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19852260371

  • Role of Moringa oleifera leaf extract in the regulation of thyroid hormone status in adult male and female rats
    Tahiliani, P., Kar, A. 1999

    The role of Moringa oleifera aqueous leaf extract in the regulation of thyroid hormone status, was studied in adult Swiss rats. Other than the thyroid hormone concentrations, hepatic lipid peroxidation (LPO) and the activities of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were evaluated. In the first experiment, effects of the leaf extract (175 mg kg-1body wt. day-1for 10 days) were studied both in male and female animals. Following the administration of the extract, serum triiodothyronine (T3) concentration and hepatic LPO decreased with a concomitant increase in the serum thyroxine (T4) concentration, in female rats, while in males no significant changes were observed, suggesting that Moringa oleifera leaf extract is more effective in females than in the males. To evaluate the impact of a higher dose, in the second experiment, the study was repeated in female rats, with 350 mg kg-1body wt. day-1for the same duration. Almost similar reduction in the serum T3concentration (approx. 30%) and an increase in the T4concentration were observed suggesting the inhibiting nature of Moringa oleifera leaf extract in the peripheral conversion of T4to T3, the principal source of the generation of latter hormone. As the antiperoxidative effects were exhibited only by the lower dose and percent decrease in T3concentration was nearly the same by both the doses, it is suggested that the lower concentration of this plant extract may be used for the regulation of hyperthyriodism.
    Journal article
    Pharmacological Research, 1999, Vol.41, No.3, pp.319-323, 23 ref. Academic Press, Harcourt Place, 32 Jamestown Road, London, NW1 7BY, U.K. | Thyroid Research Unit, School of Life Sciences, Vigyan Bhawan, Devi Ahilya University, Khandwa road Campus, Indore, 452 017, India | 1043-6618 0031-6989
    Keywords : plant extracts; medicinal plants; leaves; endocrine system; thyroid gland
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10675284&dopt=Abstract |
    Database : CABI, 20000315309 Ingenta, Online articles, SICI (online): 1043-6618413319323 INIST, 14306 Pubmed, 10675284 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Preliminary studies of the antifungal activities of some medicinal plants against Basidiobolus and some other pathogenic fungi
    Nwosu, M.O., Okafor, J.I. 1995

    The antifungal activities of extracts of 10 medicinal plants collected from south-eastern parts of Nigeria were tested against seven pathogenic fungi using the broth dilution and agar plate methods. All the extracts at 1: 10 dilution inhibited the growth of Basidiobolus haptosporus and B. ranarum but did not inhibit that of Aspergillus fumigatus, Geotrichum candidum and Candida albicans. While extracts from Piper guineense, Ocimum gratissimum, Moringa oleifera and Erythrophleum suaveolens inhibited the growth of Trichophyton rubrum and T. mentagrophytes, those from Jatropha curcas, Mitracarpus villosus, Azadirachta indica and Gongronema latifolium failed to do so at 1:10 dilution. Extract from Piper sp. was also able to inhibit the growth of B. haptosporus at a concentration as low as 1:80 dilution followed by those of Ocimum and Rauvolfia spp. at 1:40 dilution. These results indicate possible use of certain plant extracts in the treatment of subcutaneous phycomycosis in humans and animals.
    Journal article
    MYCOSES. 1995 , vol. 38 , no 5-6 , pp. 191 - 195 | Department of Botany, University of Nigeria, PMB 006, Nsukka, Enugu State, Nigeria. | 0933-7407
    Keywords : medicinal plants; plant extracts; antifungal properties; dermatophytes
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=8531930&dopt=Abstract |
    Database : CABI, 19951203258 INIST, 4156B Pubmed, 8531930 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Studies on some psychopharmalogical actions of Moringa oleifera Lam. (Moringaceae) Leaf extract
    Pal, M., Mukherjee, P. K. Saha, B. P. Pal, M. Saha, B. P. 1996

    The methanol extract of the leaves of Moringa oleifera Lam. was investigated for some psychopharmacological actions in animals. The extract was found to produce a significant alteration in general behavioural pattern by head dip test, Y-maze test, evasion test, and reduction in muscle relaxant activity by rotarod test, chimney test and traction test. Beside these, the extract also potentiated pentobarbitone induced sleeping time and lowered body temperature in experimental animals.
    Journal article
    PTR. Phytotherapy research.1996 , vol. 10 , no 5 , pp. 402 - 405 | DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACEUTICAL TECHNOLOGY, FACULTY OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY, JADAVPUR UNIVERSITY |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : INIST, 21695

  • Studies on the antiulcer activity of Moringa oleifera leaf extract on gastric ulcer models in rats.
    Pal, S.K., Mukherjee, P.K. Saha, B.P. 1995

    The methanol fraction of M. oleifera leaf extract was found to possess significant protective actions in acetylsalicylic acid, serotonin and indomethacin induced gastric lesions in experimental rats. A significant enhancement of the healing process in acetic acid induced chronic gastric lesions was also observed with the extract-treated animals
    Journal article
    PTR. Phytotherapy research. 1995 , vol. 9 , no 6 , pp. 463 - 465 | Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Jadavpur University, Calcutta 700032, India. | 0951-418X
    Keywords : leaves; plant extracts; traditional medicines; gastrointestinal agents; stomach ulcers; rats
    Location : | India; West bengal
    Database : AGRICOLA, RS164 P59 CABI, 19950316566 INIST, 21695

  • Studies of some psychopharmacological actions of Moringa oleifera Lam. (Moringaceae) leaf extract.
    Pal, S.K., Mukherjee, P.K. Saha, K. Pal, M. Saha, B.P. 1996

    The MeOH extract of leaves of M. oleifera (collected from West Bengal, India) was investigated for psychopharmacological actions in mice and rats. The extract significantly altered general behavioural patterns (decreased head dip responses, reduced exploratory behaviour and inhibited curiosity), and reduced motor coordination and muscle tone in the rotarod, chimney and traction tests. The extract also potentiated pentobarbitone-induced sleeping time and lowered body temperature in experimental animals.
    Journal article
    Phytotherapy research : PTR.Aug 1996. v. 10 (5) p. 402-405. | | 0951-418X
    Keywords : traditional medicines; body temperature; medicinal plants; plant extracts; pharmacology; nervous sys
    Location : | West Bengal; India
    Database : CABI, 19960308972

  • In vitro screening of certain indigenous plants for their antimycotic activity.
    Panwar, H. S., Nauriyal, M. M. Joshi, H. C. 1979

    Extracts of Curcuma longa (rhizome), Barleria prionitis (leaves), Melia azadirachta (leaves), Moringa pterygosperma (leaves) and Acacia catechu (stem bark) were tested in vitro for antimycotic activity against Trichophyton mentagrophytes, T. simii, T. rubrum and Microsporum gypseum. Extracts of C. longa were active against T. mentagrophytes and T. simii; B. prionitis against T. mentagrophytes and M. gypseum; Melia azadirachta against T. mentagrophytes, T. simii and T. rubrum; Moringa pterygosperma against T. mentagrophytes and T. simii.
    Journal article
    Veterinary Research Bulletin, 1979, Vol.2, No.2, pp.164-167, 8 ref. | Dep. Pharmacol., Coll. Vet. Sci. Animal Husbandry, Mathura, 28102 India. |
    Keywords : Dermatophytes; plant extracts; antifungal agents; medicinal plants
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19811370998

  • Uterine histoarchitecture during pre and post-implantation periods of rats treated with aqueous extract of Moringa oleifera Lam.
    Prakash AO, Pathak S Shukla S Mathur R. 1987

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Acta Eur Fertil. 1987 Mar-Apr;18(2):129-35. pp.129-35 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=3630576&dopt=Abstract |
    Database : Pubmed, 3630576 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Ovarian response to aqueous extract of Moringa oleifera during early pregnancy in rats.
    Prakash, A. O., 1988

    Ovaries of pregnant rats fed (by gavage) a root extract of M. oleifera remained in the cyclic condition.
    Journal article
    Fitoterapia, 1988, Vol.59, No.2, pp.89-96, 17 ref. | Lab. Reproductive Biol., Jiwaji Univ., Gwalior 474 011, India. | 0367-326X
    Keywords : roots; composition; Medicinal properties; Pharmaceutical products
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19880351769

  • Chemical investigation of aqueous extract of the mature and premature flowers of Moringa oleifera (Sajina) and structural studies of a polysaccharideisolated from it's premature flowers
    Pramanik, A., Islam, Syed Siraiul 1998

    The aqueous extract of the mature flowers of Moringa oleifera collected in West Bengal contained the free neutral sugars D-mannose and D-glucose in the ratio 1:5 and 2 unidentified carbohydrate bearing materials along with proteins and ascorbic acid, but no polysaccharide. In contrast, the the aqueous extract of pre-mature flowers was composed of the above materials (with varying proportions) and a polysaccharide (PS) which on hydrolysis gave D-glucose, D-Galactose and D-glucuronic acid in a molar ratio of 1.0:1.9:0.9. Using methylation, periodate oxidation and partial hydrolysis studies, a plausible structure was been assigned to the repeating unit of the PS.
    Journal article
    Indian journal of chemistry. Sect. B: Organic chemistry, including medicalchemistry. 1998 , vol. 37 , no 7 , pp. 676 - 682 | Department of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Vidyasagar University, Midnapore 721 102, West Bengal, India. | 0376-4699
    Keywords :
    Location : | India; West Bengal
    Database : CABI, 19980615358 INIST, 2364F2

  • Moringa oleifera Lam., Medicinal Plants of the Philippines
    Quisumbing, E., 1978

    (No abstract)
    Book
    Katha Publications Company, Inc, pp 346-349 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Les plantes m?dicinales de la Nouvelle Cal?donie
    Rageau, Jean, Schmid, Maurice (collab.) 1973

    (No abstract)
    Report
    ORSTOM, Paris (FR), 1973, 139 p., bibl., ill. - (Travaux et Documents de l'ORSTOM (FRA), No 23) | |
    Keywords : cultivated plant; wild plant; flora, taxonomy; pharmacopoeia; medicinal properties
    Location : | Nouvelle Cal?donie
    Database : Horizon, F A06261/2; B CB12/2; M CM 9/1; M A06261/1; C EB23-718 RAG/1

  • Antibacterial activity of some selected medicinal plants.
    Rajendhran, J., Mani, M. A. et al. 1998

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Geobios Jodhpur 25(4): 280-282. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • In vivo radioprotective effect of Moringa oleifera leaves.
    Rao, A.V., Devi, P.U. Kamath, R. 2001

    Radioprotective property of Moringa oleifera leaves was investigated in healthy adult Swiss albino mice. Animals were injected (ip) with 150 mg/kg body weight of 50 methanolic extract (ME) of M. oleifera leaves, as a single dose, or in 5 daily fractions of 30 mg/kg each, and exposed to whole body gamma irradiation (RT, 4 Gy) 1 hr later. Five animals from each group were sacrificed at 1, 2 and 7 days after treatment. Bone marrow protection was studied by scoring aberrations in metaphase chromosomes and micronucleus induction in polychromatic erythrocytes and normochromatic erythrocytes. Pretreatment with a single dose of 150 mg/kg ME significantly reduced the percent aberrant cells to 2/3rd that of RT alone group on day 1 and brought the values to normal range by day 7 post-irradiation. A similar effect was also seen for the micronucleated cells. Fractionated administration of ME (30 mg/kg x 5) gave a higher protection than that given by the same dose administered as a single treatment. ME also inhibited the Fenton reaction-generated free radical activity in vitro in a concentration dependent manner. These results demonstrate that pretreatment with the methanolic leaf extract of M. oleifera confers significant radiation protection to the bone marrow chromosomes in mice and this may lead to the higher 30 day survival after lethal whole body irradiation.
    Journal article
    Indian Journal of Experimental Biology, 2001, vol. 39, no. 9, pp. 858-863 National Institute of Science Communication, New Delhi, India | Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore, India. | 0019-5189
    Keywords : bone marrow; chromosomes; erythrocytes; irradiation; leaves; plant extracts
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11831365&dopt=Abstract |
    Database : CABI, 20013126320 Ingenta, Uncover plus INIST, 2364C Pubmed, PMID: 11831365 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Oedema suppressant activity of the stem bark of Moringa pterygosperma Gaertn
    Rao, K. S., Mishra, S. H. 1997

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Indian drugs. 1997 , vol. 34 , no 3 , pp. 146 - 148 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : INIST, 19200

  • Anti-inflammatory and antihepatotoxic activities of the roots of Moringa pterygosperma gaertn
    Rao, K. S., Mishra, S. H. 1998

    The roots of M. pterygosperma [M. oleifera ], which have many medicinal uses including as a carminative, stomachic, abortifacient, cardiac tonic and in paralytic conditions, rheumatism, liver disease, asthma and epilepsy, were obtained from a commercial source in Vadodara, India. The roots of M. pterygosperma in powder and extract form were studied for their antiinflammatory and antihepatotoxic activities in rats. The methanolic extract showed significant oedema suppressant activity against carrageenan-induced paw oedema similar to that of indomethacin. The aqueous extract showed significant activity against carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity, total aqueous extract against paracetamol-induced hepatotoxicity and methanolic extract against rifampicin-induced hepatotoxicity.
    Journal article
    Indian journal of pharmaceutical sciences. 1998 , vol. 60 , no 1 , pp. 12 - 16 | Pharmacy Department, Faculty of Technology & Engineering, M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara 390 001, Gujarat, India. | 0250-474X
    Keywords : plant extracts; rifampicin; roots; oedema; medicinal properties; pharmacology
    Location : | India; Gujarat
    Database : CABI, 19980312794 INIST, 2368

  • Drumstick polysaccharide as pharmaceutical adjuvant
    Rao, Kurma S., Mishra, S.H. 1993

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Indian J. Nat.Prod., 9 (1) pp3-6. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Pterygospermin, the antibiotic principle of Moringa pterygosperma
    Rao, P.L.N., Kurup, P.A. 1953

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Indian J. Pharm. 15(12):315 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Absorption of aluminium ions by some raw food items and effect of some natural chelating compounds on the absorption.
    Rao, T. V. R. K., Tuhina Vijay 2001

    A study was conducted to examine the absorption of aluminium (Al) ions by some raw food items (rice, horsegram, potato, and drumstick and tea leaves) and the effect of some natural chelating compounds (lactic, malic, tartaric, citric, or succinic acids) on Al absorption by these foods. Absorption of aluminium ions by the raw food items is tabulated indicating that all the 5 foods had taken 1 h to complete the absorption. The inhibition efficiency of natural chelating compounds towards aluminium absorption by the food items is given indicating that lactic acid was the most effective inhibitor of Al absorption, showing 63-78% inhibition except in case of drumstick leaves. It is suggested that the inhibitory effect on Al absorption by foods, by different chelating agents is highly specific.
    Journal article
    Indian Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics, 2001, Vol.38, No.5, pp.156-159, 10 ref. Avinashilingam Institute for Home Science and Higher Education for Women, Deemed University, Coimbatore, India | Department of Chemistry, Purnia College, Purnia (Bihar), India. | 0022-3174
    Keywords : aluminium; chelating agents; metabolic inhibitors; raw foods
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 20013115188

  • Diurnal rhythmicity of ascorbic acid, carbohydrate fractions and activity in Moringa pterygosperma Gaertn. leaves.
    Rao,J.V.S., Rao, G.R. Krishna, C.M. Rao, G.G. 1979

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Comparative physiology and ecology.Oct 1979. v. 4 (4) p. 243-245. ill. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : AGRICOLA, QP82 A1C6

  • Diuretic activity of Moringa oleifera lam
    Ruckmani, B K., Jaykar Anandan,R. 1997

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Indian drugs. 1997 , vol. 34 , no 5 , pp. 289 - 291 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : INIST, 19200

  • Effect of Moringa oleifera lam on paracetamol-induced hepatotoxicity
    Ruckmani, B K., Kavimani, S. Anandan, R. Jaykar, B. 1998

    Aqueous and alcoholic extracts of roots and flowers of M. oleifera , collected in Trichy, India, were screened for antihepatotoxic activity in paracetamol-treated albino rats. Liver function was assessed based on liver to body weight ratio, serum levels of transaminase, alkaline phosphatase and bilirubin. All extracts were found to have antihepatotoxic activity. The LD50 value of ethanolic extracts of roots and flowers was 1023 and 1047 mg/kg, respectively, and corresponding values for aqueous extracts was 1078 and 1092 mg/kg, respectively.
    Journal article
    Indian journal of pharmaceutical sciences. 1998 , vol. 60 , no 1 , pp. 33 - 35 | Periyar College of Pharmaceutical Sciences for girls, Trichy 21, Tamil Nadu, India. | 0250-474X
    Keywords : medicinal properties; roots; flowers; liver; plant extracts; phosphoric monoester hydrolases
    Location : | India; Tamil Nadu
    Database : CABI, 19980312797 INIST, 2368

  • Drumstick plant emerges to prevent cancer.
    Rupasinghe U., 2001

    (No abstract)
    Newspaper article
    Thursday, 29 November 2001, Daily News | |
    Keywords :
    Location : http://dailynews.lk/2001/11/29/fea05.html |
    Database :

  • Studies in medicinal plants: Part VI. Chemical constituents of Moringa oleifera Lamk. (hybrid variety) and isolation of 4-hydroxymellein.
    Saluja, M. P., Kapil, R. S. Popli, S. P. 1978

    4-Hydroxymellein, vanillin, beta -sitostenone, octacosanoic acid and beta -sitosterol were isolated from M. oleifera stems.
    Journal article
    Indian Journal of Chemistry, B, 1978, Vol.16, No.11, pp.1044-1045, 5 ref. | Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226001, India. |
    Keywords : Vanillin; coumarins; composition; medicinal plants
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19790378765

  • Antimicrobial activity of nine common plants in Kerala, India.
    Sasidharan, V. K., Krishnakumar, T. Manjula, C. B. 1998

    Nine medicinal plants, Aegle marmelos , Leucas indica , Murraya konigii [M. koenigii ], Tamarindus indica , Pachyptera alliacea , Eupatorium odoratum [Chromolaena odorata ], Moringa oleifera , Cinnamomum verum (syn. C. zeylanicum ) and Cymbopogon citratus , used to treat various infections in Kerala, Indi, were screened for activity against Aspergillus niger , Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli . Except for Aegle marmelos , all of the aqueous and alcoholic extracts (5%) inhibited the growth of the microorganisms. Alcoholic extracts were more potent than aqueous extracts. Alcoholic extracts (5%) of L. indica and Cymbopogon citratus exhibited the highest antifungal activity while that of Eupatorium odoratum exhibited the highest activity against S. aureus and Escherichia coli .
    Journal article
    Philippine Journal of Science, 1998, Vol.127, No.1, pp.65-72, 14 ref. | Department of Life Sciences, University of Calicut, Kerala, India 673635, India. | 0031-7683
    Keywords : medicinal properties; plant extracts; antifungal properties; antibacterial properties
    Location : | Kerala; India
    Database : CABI, 19990311662

  • M?dicaments et aliments : approche ethnopharmacologique = Medicines and foods : ethnopharmacological approach
    Schr?der, E. (ed.), Balansard, G. (ed.) Cabalion, Pierre (ed.) Fleurentin, J. (ed.) Mazars, G. (ed.) 1996

    (No abstract)
    Conference paper
    ORSTOM; SFE, Paris (FRA); Metz (FRA), 1996, 418 p., bibl., cart., ill., tabl., graph., phot. - (Colloques et S?minaires (FRA)) - 2.; 11. Colloque Europ?en d'Ethnopharmacologie = European Symposium on Ethnopharmacology; Conf?rence Internationale d'Ethnom | |
    Keywords : health anthropology; food anthropology; ethnopharmacology; medicinal plant
    Location : |
    Database : Horizon, F A010005511/2; B CB52 80/1; M CM 11/1; M 056SOCSAN HEI/1; C EB20-001 HEI/1; NI 076PLAMED03SCH/1; CA GFBrB5FLE/1; W 5630/1; Q 615 SCH/1; V VEG 3486/1; E A63 SCH/1; PT C12/1; PT SANT.SCH/1

  • Studies on interesterification of Moringa oilfor utilization in pharmacy. Enriched title: Studies on interesterification of Moringa [concanensis] oilfor utilization in pharmacy
    Sengupta, A., Sengupta, C. Das, P.K. 1974

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Indian J Technol, Aug 1974, 12 (8) p. 362-365. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : AGRICOLA, 475 IN22

  • Bacteriological and physiological studies of a vibriocidal drug derived from an indigenous source
    Sengupta, K.P., et al. 1956

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Antiseptic 53:287-292 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Some commercially important Indian gum exudates.
    Soni, P. L., 1995

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Indian Forester 121(8): 754-759. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Comparison of antimicrobial activity of seeds of different Moringa oleifera varieties.
    Spiliotis, V., Lalas, S. et al. 1998

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Letters 8(1): 39-40. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • The metabolic status of traumatic gum ducts in Moringa oleifera Lam.
    Subrahmanyam, S. V., Shah, J. J. 1988

    Samples of normal and injured barks of M. oleifera were examined microscopically and tested for presence of succinic dehydrogenase (SDH), acid phosphatase (ACPase) and lipase. Results show that gum ducts develop lysigenously in the bark as a result of injury. The phloem parenchyma cells at the locus of gum duct formation enlarge and are enriched with cytoplasm and nucleoplasm. These duct initials show higher SDH and ACPase activity than neighbouring cells. The duct initials undergo autolysis to form the duct lumen, whose epithelial cells are richer in SDH, ACPase, lipase, nucleic acids, proteins and insoluble polysaccharides than those of neighbouring cells. The epithelial cells show labyrinthine wall deposition; these deposits are greater on the duct lumen side than on the radial wall side. The inner tangential wall of the epithelial cells facing the duct lumen appears swollen. The degenerating epithelial cells show diffuse reaction products of SDH and ACPase; some accumulate phenolics and by autolysis of such cells, phenolic contents are released into the gum duct.
    Journal article
    IAWA Bulletin, 1988, Vol.9, No.2, pp.187-195, 38 ref. | Hindustan Newsprint Ltd., Newsprintnagar-686 616, Kerala, India. | 0254-3915
    Keywords : Bark; chemistry; plant physiology; Gummosis; broadleaves
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19880626602

  • A comparative study on the effect of some indigenous drugs on normal and steroid-depressed healing.
    Udupa, S. L., Udupa, A. L. Kulkarni, D. R. 1998

    Aqueous extracts of 4 plant materials used as indigenous drugs (leaves of Aloe barbadensis and Tridax procumbens ; roots + root bark of Aegle marmelos and Moringa oleifera ) were studied for their effects on both normal and steroid-depressed healing of wounds. The herbals not only promoted healing but also overcame the depression of healing caused by dexamethasone. The increased lysyl oxidase activity induced by these plant preparations could be responsible for their wound-healing activity. Raised levels of nucleic acids indicate that the action may be at the cellular level.
    Journal article
    Fitoterapia, 1998, Vol.69, No.6, pp.507-510, 16 ref. | Dept. of Biochemistry, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal 576119, Karnataka, India. | 0367-326X
    Keywords : bark; roots; leaves; oxidoreductases; plant extracts; traditional medicines
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19990302019

  • Studies on the anti-inflammatory and wound healing properties of Moringa oleifera and Aegle marmelos
    Udupa, S. L., Udupa, A.L. Kulkarni, D. R. 1994

    The root extracts of M. oleifera and A. marmelos (collected from India) were studied for their antiinflammatory and wound healing properties. Antiinflammatory action was studied by observing the reduction in carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema at 3 h. Wound healing effects were studied in incision (skin breaking strength), excision (% wound contraction and epithelization time), and dead space (granuloma breaking strength and biochemical parameters) wound models. Both extracts showed significant acute antiinflammatory activity; only the A. marmelos extract significantly suppressed chronic inflammation. A significant increase in skin tensile strength, lysyl oxidase activity and hexosamine content were observed in the M. oleifera -treated animals, indicating a pro-healing action probably due to better cross-linking of collagen. A. marmelos was more effective as an antiinflammatory agent.
    Journal article
    Fitoterapia. 1994 , vol. 65 , no 2 , pp. 119 - 123 | Dept. of Biochemistry, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal 576119, Karnataka, India. | 0367-326X
    Keywords : roots; plant extracts; medicinal plants; collagen
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19950302267 INIST, 16120

  • Less known medicinal uses of plants among the tribals of Keonjhar district of Orissa.
    Veena Chandra, Prafulla Soni Sharma, S. D. 1998

    Ethnobotanical observations are reported for 10 species (nearly all woody plants), recorded from the Ho tribes during a survey around Bolani Iron Ore Mines, Keonjhar district, Orissa, India. The species are arranged alphabetically, giving details of local names and local uses. The uses reported are new on comparison with the important published literature on medicinal and economic plants of the country. The 10 species are: Annona squamosa (shrub or small tree), Asparagus racemosus (scrambling/scandent woody perennial), Azadirachta indica (tree), Carica papaya (small tree), Curcuma longa (herb), Entada pursaetha (woody climber), Gossypium arboreum (small tree/large shrub), Helicteres isora (shrub/small tree), Mangifera indica (large tree) and Moringa oleifera (small tree).
    Journal article
    Van Vigyan, 1998, Vol.36, No.2/3/4, pp.115-117, 7 ref. | Systematic Botany, Botany Division, Forest Research Institute, Dehra Dun, India. | 0970-3071
    Keywords : ethnobotany; woody plants; medicinal plants; forest trees
    Location : | Orissa; India
    Database : CABI, 20000606620

  • Mutagens from roasted seeds of Moringa oleifera
    Villasenor IM, Lim-Sylianco CY Dayrit F. 1989

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Mutat Res; Oct; 224 (2): 209-219. | Institute of Chemistry University of the Philippines Diliman, Quezon City |
    Keywords :
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=2797036&dopt=Abstract |
    Database : Pubmed, 2797036 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Structure of a mutagen from roasted seeds of Moringa oleifera
    Villasenor IM, Finch P Lim-Sylianco CY Dayrit F 1989

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Carcinogenesis 10(6): 1085-1088. | Institute of Chemistry, University of the Philipines, Diliman, Quezon City. |
    Keywords :
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=2720902&dopt=Abstract |
    Database : Pubmed, 2720902 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Effect of some Indian vegetables on the glucose and insulin response in diabetic subjects.
    William, F., Lakshminarayanan, S. Chegu, H. 1993

    Blood glucose and corresponding insulin values in response to 3 commonly used vegetables in southern India in an isocarbohydrate meal were compared with the values achieved in response to glucose 75 g in non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus patients. The meal contained available carbohydrate 73-79 g, protein 10-13.5 g, fat 5 g and crude fibre 0.5-1.3 g. The vegetables tested were bittergourd (Momordica charantia ), curry leaves (Murrya koiengii ) and drumstick leaves (Moringa oleifera ). The incremental areas of the standard meal without the vegetable and the test meal with any one of the vegetables were significantly reduced compared with glucose 75 g. Blood glucose responses (% mean plus or minus s.e.m.) of meals containing bittergourd, curry leaves or drumstick leaves were 72 plus or minus 10, 60 plus or minus 7 and 56 plus or minus 4, respectively, compared with glucose 75 g, and 88 plus or minus 7, 97 plus or minus 6 and 79 plus or minus 5, respectively, compared with the standard meal without any vegetables. Plasma insulin responses to test meals and glucose did not differ significantly from each other. It is concluded that the reduced blood glucose response to drumstick leaves is not due to insulin secretion and that the factors responsible for these changes need further evaluation.
    Journal article
    International journal of food sciences and nutrition.Oct 1993. v. 44 (3) p. 191-196. | Division of Clinical Biochemistry, Cancer Institute, Madras 600 020, India. | 0963-7486
    Keywords : leaves; blood sugar; insulin secretion; diabetes; men; women
    Location : | India
    Database : AGRICOLA, TX341 H85 CABI, 19941411796

  • Development of Lectins as diagnostic tools
    X, 2002

    (No abstract)
    web publication
    Regional Cancer Centre (India) | a summary of an investigation of the use of lectins from Moringa in cancer diagnostic |
    Keywords : lectins; cancer; diagnostic
    Location : http://www.rcctvm.org/lectins.htm |
    Database :

  • Efecto tripanocida de extractos de Azadirachta indica, Melia azedarach, Moringa oleifera y Ocinum Santum sobre Epimastigotes y tripamastigotes sangu?colas de Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum) Cruzi.
    Yanes, A., Henr?quez, D. Hasegawa, M. Bubis, J. 0

    (No abstract)
    Conference paper
    IV Simposio Internacional de Qu?mica de Productos Naturales y sus Aplicacones. Talca, Chile. 1 - 4 de Diciembre. DID. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Modulatory potency of drumstick lectin on the host defense system
    Zahangir Alam Saud, Absar, Nurul 1994

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    J.Exp.Clin.Cancer Res., 13 (3) pp205-209 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Role of natural epizootics of a NPV disease in controlling Prosopis juliflora defoliator Taragama siva outbreak in North-West Rajasthan.
    Ahmed, S. I., Shivesh Kumar 1998

    The field population of Taragama siva [Streblote siva] , a polyphagous forest insect pest, was noticed severely infected with a nuclear polyhedrosis virus (NPV), at Jodhpur and in adjacent localities of Rajasthan, India, during August-September 1995. Further field studies showed a high incidence of the disease in the young larval population of the pest. Samples of late instar larvae collected in the field from the 6 tree species to which the pest was mainly confined (Prosopis juliflora, Acacia nilotica, Moringa oleifera, Zizyphus mauritiana [Ziziphus mauritiana], Tecomella undulata, Prosopis cineraria ) showed 87.6-96.66% mortality (depending on the tree species) in the laboratory, most of which was due to NPV infection rather than other causes. The number of cocoons formed at the end of outbreak was extremely low. There was good evidence to suggest that the virus infection was the main cause in the sudden collapse of pest population in the field.
    Journal article
    Indian Forester, 1998, Vol.124, No.11, pp.952-958, 21 ref. | Division of Forest Protection, Arid Forest Research Institute, Jodhpur (Rajasthan), India. | 0019-4816
    Keywords : forest pests; insect pests; biological control; entomopathogens; agricultural entomology
    Location : | Rajasthan; India
    Database : CABI, 19990608578

  • A new wilt disease of wild Moringa (M. concanensis ).
    Alaka Pande, Vinaya Ghate 1998

    Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. moringae sp. nov. is described as the causal agent for wilt in M. concanensis seedlings in nursery beds in India.
    Journal article
    Journal of Economic and Taxonomic Botany, 1998, Vol.22, No.2, pp.423-425, 2 ref. | Agharkar Research Institute, G.G. Agarkar Road, Pune 411 004, India. | 0250-9768
    Keywords : plant pathogens; fungi; new species; forest trees;
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19991001766

  • Quelques observations sur la physiologie des semences et des plantules foresti?res de la zone du Nazinon
    Alexandre, Daniel-Yves, 1992

    (No abstract)
    Article in book
    IN : Some, L.M. (ed.); De Kam, M. (ed.) - Les probl?mes de semences foresti?res, notamment en Afrique. Backhuys, Leiden (NLD), 1992, p. 203-209, bibl., ill., tabl. | |
    Keywords : vegetal formation; forest, flora, phytoecology, vegetal physiology, seed
    Location : | Burkania Faso; Sissili Province; Nazinon Forest
    Database : Horizon, F B010010127/2

  • Major insect pests of forest trees in north Bihar.
    Ali, M. S., Chaturvedi, O. P. Nair, K. S. S.: Sharma, J. K.; Varma, R. V. (ed) 1996

    Insect pests and disease causative pathogens affect seedlings and plantations in early and post growth sequences of forest production systems, saplings and sometimes mature trees. Insect pest were observed in the field during April to September, with a lull during November to February. Termites (Microtermes spp.; Odontotermes sp.), white grub (Holotrichia consanguinea and H. serrata ), brown field cricket (Brachytrupes portentosus [Tarbinskiellus portentosus ]) and Bihar hairy caterpillar (Spilosoma obliqua [Spilarctia obliqua ]) were the major nursery insect pests causing subterranean damage of 4-40% of seedlings. Other insect pests, such as the bark borer (Indarbela quadrinotata ), teak defoliator/skeletonizer (Hyblaea puera and Eutectona machaeralis ), sissoo defoliator (Plecoptera reflexa .) and Karanj leaf miner (Lithocolletis virgulata [Cameraria virgulata ]), though low in numbers, sometimes caused damage to the saplings and mature trees. Major trees infested by different insect pests were Dalbergia sissoo, Tectona grandis, Moringa oleifera catechu, Gmelina arborea, Ziziphus jujuba [Ziziphus mauritiana ], Pongamia pinnata and Ricinus communis .
    Conference paper
    Impact of diseases and insect pests in tropical forests. Proceedings of the IUFRO Symposium, Peechi, India, 23-26 November 1993., 1996, pp.464-467, 5 ref. Kerala Forest Research Institute (KFRI), Peechi, India | Impact of diseases and insect pests in tropical forests. Proceedings of the IUFRO Symposium, Peechi, India, 23-26 November 1993. Department of Forestry, Rajendra Agricultural University, Pusa, (Samastipur) 848 125, Bihar, India. | 81-85041-13-X
    Keywords : insect pests; forest pests; nurseries; seedlings
    Location : | India; Bihar
    Database : CABI, 19980606488

  • Insecticidal control of fruit fly, Gitona sp., leaf caterpillar, Noorda blitealis Walk. and aphid, Aphis craccivora Koch on annual moringa.
    Anjaneyamurthy, J. N.; Regupathy, A., 1989

    In field trials with 6 insecticides in Tamil Nadu, India, dichlorvos at 0.04% and fenthion at 0.05% provided the best control of the drosophilid Gitona sp., the pyralid Noorda blitealis and Aphis craccivora in Moringa oleifera.
    Journal article
    South Indian Horticulture, 1989, Vol.37, No.2, pp.84-93, 5 ref. | Department of Agricultural Entomology, Centre for Plant Protection Studies, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore 641003, India. | 0038-3473
    Keywords : Insecticides; Fatty oil plants; chemical control; oil plants; agricultural entomology
    Location : | Tamil Nadu; India
    Database : CABI, 19921159477

  • A contribution to the diversity of insects with reference to pollination mechanism in some angiosperms.
    Ashoke Bhattacharya, Sudhendu Mandal 2000

    Pollination is an important phenomenon for gene recombination as a result of which genetic and species diversity is promoted. Regular observation on the pollination mechanism of five angiosperm plants belonging to three families namely Lantana camara Linn. (Verbenaceae), Moringa oleifera Lamk. (Moringaceae), Syzygium jambos (Linn.) Alston. (Myrtaceae), Tectona grandis Linn. f. (Verbenaceae) and Vitex negundo Linn. (Verbenaceae) revealed that different members of Thysanoptera, Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera, etc. visited flowers and enhanced pollinating potential. All the plants showed diurnal anthesis. Pollen-ovule ratio per flower was found to be variable. Netting and bagging of flowers indicated that the external agents might be required for successful fruit setting which some times varied depending upon the availability of effective pollinators.
    Journal article
    2000, pp.197-204, 21 ref. Daya Publishing House, Delhi, India | Ed: Aditya, A. K.; Haldar, P. Department of Botany, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan-731 235, India. | 81-7035-226-6
    Keywords : pollination; pollinators; beneficial insects
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 20013027297

  • Agroforestry, attitude towards risk and nutrient availability: a case study of south Indian farming systems.
    Babu, S. C., Rajasekaran, B. 1991

    The introduction of two systems of agroforestry to the farmers' portfolio is evaluated for their changes in cropping pattern, input use, income generation, farmers' attitude towards risk, and nutrient availability. Two different types of farming system were studied: irrigated and dryland. Otherwise, the areas studied (the Sarkar Samakulam block of Coimbatore district for the irrigated farms; and the Vembakulam block of Madurai district for the dryland farms; both in Tamil Nadu) were similar in their soil properties and cropping patterns: crops grown were cotton, sorghum and finger millet (both systems), rice (irrigated farming only) and chillies (dryland farming only). The two agroforestry systems introduced were growing either drumstick (Moringa oleifera ) or Leucaena leucocephala on the bunds of crop fields. Farm survey data were collected from 165 farmers in 1985 and were analysed within a mean-variance framework using a quadratic programming model to identify the risk aversion levels of the farmers. The results indicate that the risk-taking preferences of farmers should be given consideration in evaluating the effect of agroforestry systems. Between the two agroforestry systems analysed, the one with drumstick is shown to increase the risk of crop production while the one with leucaena reduces the risk and enables farmers to invest in more risky cash crops. The effect of agroforestry on crop allocation, input use and income differs due to the differences in resource availability of the farmers. The influence of agroforestry on nutrient availability of the farm households (data are given for energy, protein, calcium and vitamins A and C) also differs based on the agroforestry components, orientation (subsistence or market) of the farming and the nature of farming systems. It is argued that the design of agroforestry systems should consider differences in resource constraints in farming systems and risk attitudes of farmers towards their allocation decisions, and that such considerations would greatly enhance the successful adoption of agroforestry in developing countries.
    Journal article
    Agroforestry Systems, 1991, Vol.15, No.1, pp.1-15, 39 ref. | Cornell Food and Nutrition Policy Program, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 18435-4401, USA. | 0167-4366
    Keywords : Agroforestry; Computer techniques; Production structure; Farming systems; farmers' attitudes
    Location : | India; Tamil Nadu
    Database : CABI, 19920659386

  • Nodulation and nitrogenase activity in Vigna mungo in response to the seed-soaking and root-dressing treatments of Moringa leaf extracts
    Bandana Bose, Srivastava, R. C. Mathur, S. N. 1987

    Effects of 0.04, 0.08, 0.16 and 0.24% ethanolic extracts of Moringa oleifera leaves on nodulation and nitrogenase activity in V. mungo applied as a seed or a root dressing were studied. Both application methods increased nodule number/plant. FW and DW of nodules also increased with both application methods. Max. DW of nodules at 30 days was 8.5 and 7.8 mg/plant with 0.08% ethanolic residue applied by seed-soaking and root-dressing, resp. The lower 2 concn of extract were the most effective in increasing nitrogenase activity irrespective of application method.
    Journal article
    Indian Journal of Plant Physiology. 30(4): 362-367 | Dep. Plant Physiol., Banaras Hindu Univ., Varanasi 221005, Uttar Pradesh, India. | 0019-5502
    Keywords : roots; seed treatment; nodulation; Nitrogen fixation; Growth
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19880715459

  • Growth analysis of moringa Cv PKM-1.
    Beaulah, A., Vadivelu, E. Rajadurai, K.R. 2001

    (No abstract)
    Thesis
    Under organic and inorganic systems of culture PKM thesis, HC & RI. PKM | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Studies on utilization of Moringa oleifera leaves as animal feed.
    Becker, 1995

    (No abstract)
    Report
    | Institute for Animal Production in the tropics and Subtropics. University of Hohehheim. Germany. |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Efeito do alum?nio sobre o crescimento de duas esp?cies florestais
    Beutler, A. N., Fernandes, L. A. Faquin, V. 2001

    An experiment was carried out at the Soil Science Department of Universidade Federal de Lavras, in Lavras (MG), in November 1998, to study the effect of aluminum on the initial growth of two forest species, under greenhouse conditions using a nutrient solution. After two weeks in dilute nutrient solution to 1 3 and without aluminum, two Moringa (Moringa oleifera) and two Angico (Anandenantha peregrina) plants were transplanted to 1.5 L pots, and grown in nutrient solution. The aluminum levels were 0.0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0 mg L, with pH 4.0 ? 0.2, adjusted daily during 70 days. Plant height was evaluated and plants were divided in aerial part and root, to determine dry matter and content of N and P. The increasing aluminum levels progressively reduced plant height and root dry matter production in both species, and the aerial part in the Angico plant. Nitrogen content in the Moringa plant reduced with increasing aluminum levels. Phosphorus content in the Moringa andAngico aerial parts reduced with aluminum levels above 5.0 mg L in the nutrient solution.
    Journal article
    Revista brasileira de ci?ncia do solo. [ Rev. bras. ci?nc. solo. ] 2001 , vol. 25 , no 4 , pp. 923 - 928 Sociedade Brasileira de Ci?ncia do Solo, Vi?osa, Brazil | Departamento de Solos da Universidade Estadual Paulista - UNESP, CEP 14870-000 Jaboticabal (SP), Brazil. | 0100-0683
    Keywords : aluminium; growth; phosphorus; phytotoxicity; plant height; protected cultivation;
    Location : | Brazil; Minas Gerais
    Database : CABI, 20023016755 INIST, 18102

  • Phytotoxic effects of tree crops on germination and radicle extension of some food crops.
    Bhatt, B. P., Chauhan, D. S. Todaria, N. P. 1993

    Aqueous leaf and bark extracts of some agroforestry tree crops were tested for their phytotoxic (allelopathic) effects on germination and radicle extension of leguminous food crops of the region. Foliar and bark extracts of Adina cordifolia and Grewia oppositifolia inhibited the germination of Dolichos biflorus [Macrotyloma uniflorum] and Glycine max. The phytotoxic effects of the tree crops were species specific, because Phaseolus lunatus and P. mungo [Vigna mungo] were not significantly affected. A. cordifolia, G. oppositifolia, Moringa oleifera and Holoptelea integrifolia were generally more phytotoxic than Celtis australis or Ougeinia oojeinensis. Radicle extension of all four test crops was significantly reduced by all the tree crops tested except O. oojeinensis and C. australis .
    Journal article
    Tropical Science, 1993, Vol.33, No.1, pp.69-73, 9 ref. | Department of Forestry, HNB Garhwal University, Srinagar Garhwal-246 174, U.P., India. | 0041-3291
    Keywords : allelopathy; agroforestry; field crops; plant extracts; seed germination; phytotoxicity
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19950614078

  • Insect pests of vegetables and their control--drumsticks
    Butani, D. K.., Verma, S 1981

    The drumsticks tree (Moringa oleifera) in India and other regions of Asia and Africa has parts that are edible or medicinal and is cultivated in the plains beneath the Himalayas mainly for its tender pods, flowers and young leaves, which are eaten as vegetables. Notes are given on the morphology, habits, and chemical or cultural control of about 20 species of insects infesting M. oleifera and on the damage that they cause to the different parts of the tree; the insects are arranged under the headings of hairy caterpillars, leaf-eating caterpillars, trunk borer, sap-sucking insects, bud borers, and beetles and weevils. An annotated list is appended of 30 species of insects and mites recorded on M. oleifera in India; these include nearly all those mentioned in the notes and also some lasiocampids, noctuids, drosophilids and eriophyid mites that appear not to have been recorded as economic pests.
    Journal article
    Pesticides, 1981, Vol.15, No.10, pp.29-32, 8 ref. | Division of Entomology, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi-110012, India. |
    Keywords : arthropod pests; pest control; geographical distribution; chemical control; agricultural entomology
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19820592448

  • Studies on breeding systems in Moringa. 3. Fruit-, seed-set and seed germination in two flowering periods of one year of the Baramassi Moringa oleifera and chromosomal pairing in the F1 hybrid from M. oleifera X M. concanensis.
    Dogra, P. D., Pal, A. Tandon, S. 1975

    Nine clones of M. oleifera were divided into 2 groups, 1 with 2 flowering and fruit-setting periods a yr and designated the Baramassi type, and the other flowering only once a yr. The 2 groups also differed morphologically. The M. oleifera clone 7, a Baramassi type, had brown seeds, while the M. concanensis clone 1 had white seeds. The seeds of the F1 hybrids between these 2 clones (both n = 14) were all brown; F1 meiosis was normal, and pollen and seed fertility was good.
    Journal article
    Incompatibility Newsletter, 1975, Vol.6, pp.46-51 | Tree Genet. Lab., Nat. Bot. Gardens (CSIR), Lucknow, India. |
    Keywords : tree breeding; progeny testing; phenotypic selection; broadleaves
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19770643883

  • Moringa oleifera for food and water purification - selection of clones and growing of annual short stem
    Jahn, S. A. A., 1989

    M. oleifera is a tropical multipurpose tree which is readily propagated from seeds or cuttings. Both in India, its country of origin, and in other areas of cultivation, the yield and quality of seeds is highly variable, ranging from 1500 to 2000/year in Java (cuttings) to 20000 to 24000/year in Tamil Nadu, India (seed-propagated). The latter large-seeded clones were collected in the kitchen garden of a college and the nursery of a horticultural research station. A sample from Burundi was derived from trees planted by Zaire fishermen and subsequently abandoned. Clones were small-seeded in Indonesia where Moringa is primarily grown for its leaves. By contrast, trees in the Antilles and Central America had been selected for oil yield, leading to many large-seeded genotypes. Comparative water treatment experiments, in which powdered seed extracts are used to purify drinking water, indicated that seed size does not affect purification efficacy. Mature seeds gave more satisfactory results than sun-dried green seeds of equal size. The annual short-stemmed M. oleifera variety from Kudumiamalai, Tamil Nadu, is suitable for consumption, oil extraction and water purification. Recommendations on its cultivation are presented.
    Journal article
    Entwicklung + Landlicher Raum, 23 (4) pp22-25. | Water Purification Project, Deutsche Gesellschaft f?r Tech. Zusammenarbeit, Abteilung 4140 - Wasser, Dag-Hammarskj?ld-Weg 1, 6236 Eschborn, German Federal Republic. | 0343-6462
    Keywords : Oilseed plants; genetic resources; Water purification; antibacterial plants; seed production; cultiv
    Location : | India; Tamil Nadu; Indonesia; Burundi; Central Ame
    Database : CABI, 19891607392

  • Cutting interval and tree age at first cutting affect herbage production of six hedgerow tree species.
    Calub, B. M., 1998

    Contour hedgerows of 6 species were raised by direct sowing [date not given] on an acid ultisol at Los Ba?os, Philippines. Plants were at 25 cm within-row and 3 m between-row spacing, with hedgerows 5 m long. Occasional watering and weeding were done during the first 2 months after sowing. Plants were allowed to establish for 6, 9 or 12 months before the first cutting was done and subsequent cuttings were done every 8, 12 or 16 weeks. Biomass production (leaf and wood) was measured at each cutting; the experiment lasted for 3 years. Tree age at first cutting affected dry matter yield and leafy biomass proportion. In the first year total dry matter yields increased with tree age at first cutting, while percentage leafy biomass decreased. In the second year total dry matter yields were significantly higher from the trees cut first at 9 and 12 months old, while in the third year the best yield was from the trees first cut at 6 months old, although the percentage leafy biomass was less. For the trees aged 6 and 9 months at the first cutting, total dry matter yields continued to increase over the 3 yr; for those aged 12 months at the first cutting leafy biomass production but not total biomass production increased with time. The test species responded differently to the cutting frequency treatments. Gliricidia sepium, Bauhinia monandra and Leucaena leucocephala produced the highest average dry matter yields with a high proportion of leafy biomass when cut every 8 wk. The lowest dry matter yield and leafy biomass proportion were observed with Moringa oleifera , and intermediate dry matter yields were observed with Erythrina orientalis [E. variegata] and Pithecellobium dulce . The same trends were observed at the 12-wk cutting interval. For the 16-wk cutting interval the highest total dry matter yields were with G.sepium and B. monandra , and the proportion of leafy biomass production was lower for all species.
    Journal article
    Forest, Farm, and Community Tree Research Reports, 1998, Vol.3, pp.17-20, 9 ref. | Farming Systems and Soil Resources Institute, University of the Philippines at Los Ba?os, College, Laguna 4031, Philippines. |
    Keywords : hedges; biomass production; fodder; direct sowing; cutting
    Location : | Philippines
    Database : CABI, 19990607232

  • Utilizaci?n del Marango (Moringa oleifera) en la alimentaci?n de novillos en crecimiento bajo r?gimen de estabulaci?n.
    Castellon Cisne, Gonzalez Chau 1996

    (No abstract)
    Thesis
    Tesis. Universidad Centroamericana. Facultad de Ciencias Agropecuarias. Nicaragua. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Ocorr?ncia de murcha bacteriana em moringa causada por Ralstonia solanacearum
    Coelho, R. A., Marenco, K. R. Pereira, B. G. Noda, H. Boher, B. 2000

    Horseradish (Moringa oleifera) trees with symptoms sere observed in an experimental area located near Manaus. The pathogen was isolated from vascular tissue and identified as Ralstonia solanacearum, biovar I, race 1. The inoculation of healthy horseradish trees reproduced the symptoms observed in the field, and the bacterium was resiolated. Eight R. solanacearum isolates from horseradish trees were also pathogenic to tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum), sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum) and egg plant(Solarium melongena). This is the first report of bacterial wilt in horseradish tree by R. solanacearum in Brazil.
    Journal article
    Fitopatologia brasileira. [ Fitopatol. bras.. ] 2000 , vol. 25 , no 4 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : INIST, 17860

  • Packaging methods to prolong the shelf life of moringa (Moringa oleifera Lam) cv. PKM-1 during transit.
    Damodaran, T., Anbu, S. Azhakiamanavalan, R. S. Vennila, P. 1999

    Mature and uniform-size M. oleifera cv. PKM-1 fruits were collected, cleaned, surface dried and then packed in polyethylene bags, corrugated fibre board boxes (CFB) and wooden boxes. Coir waste, printers waste and dried grass were used as filling materials in CFB and wooden boxes. Packed fruits were then transported to a distance of 975 km by bus under open conditions for 12 days. After transport, the fruits were analysed for physiological loss in weight (PLW), total girth, and carotene and ascorbic acid contents. The highest PLW (77.94%) was recorded in fruits packed in wooden boxes with dried grass as filling material. The lowest PLW (24.24%) was recorded in fruits packed in polyethylene bags, followed by CFB with coir waste as filling material (27.20%). The highest (6.10 cm) and the lowest (5.06 cm) fruit girths were recorded in fruits packed in CFB with coir waste and wooden boxes with dried grass, respectively. The highest carotene (182.02 mg/100 g) and ascorbic acid (128.17 mg/100 g) contents were found in fruits packed in polyethylene bags. The fruits transported without any package had a shelf life of 4 days.
    Journal article
    South Indian Horticulture, 1999, Vol.47, No.1/6, pp.292-293, 3 ref. South Indian Horticultural Association, Coimbatore, India | Horticultural College and Research Institute, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, India. | 0038-3473
    Keywords : chemical composition; packaging materials; plant composition; polyethylene; storage losses
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 20013016895

  • Differential response of three tree species growing at low levels of ambient air pollutants.
    Krishnayya, N. S. R., Bedi, S. J. 1990

    Deciduous species (Azadirachta indica and Moringa pterygosperma [M. oleifera] ) growing at polluted localities in the Vadodara Urban Development Area in Gujarat (which contains a variety of chemical industries) showed a decrease in foliar glutathione and ascorbic acid compared with control samples from a less polluted area, while the evergreen species Tamarindus indica showed an increase in foliar ascorbic acid. T. indica showed a lower increase in foliar peroxidase over the control value than the other 2 species. Overall fluctuations were more in the deciduous species than in T. indica .
    Journal article
    Indian Journal of Ecology, 1990, Vol.17, No.1, pp.1-5, 10 ref. | Ecology and Environmental Research Laboratory, Department of Botany, M.S. University of Baroda, Baroda 390002, India. | 0304-5250
    Keywords : air pollution; foliage; chemical composition
    Location : | India; Gujarat
    Database : CABI, 19940603570

  • Studies on dry matter production of Moringa oleifera Gaertn seedlings.
    Mishra, R. M., Bhatnagar, S. 1987

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Indian Journal Of Ecology 14(2): 198-202. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Fish-meal waste as an attractant for economically important flies of agricultural crops
    Mohan, S., Gopalan, M. Sreenarayanan, V. V. 1993

    Fish-meal waste was used for attracting economically important flies attacking agricultural crops. The attracted flies were killed by an insecticide. The most significant flies attracted were sorghum shoot fly (Atherigona soccata Rond.), moringa fruit fly (Gitona sp.) and the Indian uzifly (Exorista bombycis (Louis)) which attacks mulberry silkworm. Only female flies were attracted in all cases and nearly 50% of them were with eggs
    Journal article
    Bioresource technology. 1993 , vol. 43 , no 2 , pp. 175 - 176 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : INIST, 18769

  • Foraging and resource utilization of Apis spp. (Hymenoptera: Apidae) of Bangladesh.
    Dewan, S. M. A. L., 1995

    To examine the potential for beekeeping in the rice-growing areas of Bangladesh, a 2-year field investigation was undertaken at 5 sites in the Dhaka region. Observations on Apis cerana , A. dorsata and A. florea revealed that more foragers collected nectar only than pollen only or both nectar and pollen. The peaks of pollen collection were at 10.00 h for all species of bees whereas the peaks of nectar collection were different. The diurnal patterns of foraging by A. cerana and A. dorsata were similar. All the species started foraging before 05.00 h and continued later than 18.00 h except in winter, when the daytime is shorter. Surplus honeys were extracted in winter (from Brassica napus ) and in spring (from Litchi chinensis ). A total of 86 plant species were visited, of which 29 were foraged on by all 3 bee species, and 29 by A. cerana and A. dorsata . Cocos nucifera (pollen) and Musa paradisiaca (nectar) were visited by all 3 species of bees throughout the year. Amaranthus spinosus , Benincasa hispida , Moringa oleifera , Phoenix sylvestris , Tamarindus indica and Ziziphus mauritiana were the other important plants visited by the 3 Apis species. A total of 132 plants were identified from 233 pollen samples collected from A. cerana colonies. Species of Amaranthaceae, Averrhoaceae, Cruciferae, Leguminosae, Myrtaceae, Palmae, Rhamnaceae, Rutaceae and Sapindaceae were represented most in the pollen samples. Cocos nucifera was the major source of pollen for A. cerana ; the others were Brassica napus , Phoenix sylvestris , Borassus flabellifer and Amaranthus spinosus . Pollen analyses of 39 honey samples showed that A. cerana utilized 118 plants for nectar collection. The greatest number of pollen types in the samples was 23 and the lowest was 4. Of the total honey samples, 4 were unifloral and 35 were multifloral. Twenty-five plant species occurred either as dominant (> 45%) or secondary (16-45%) in the samples. Brassica napus , Litchi chinensis and Ziziphus mauritiana were the predominant species.
    Book
    Foraging and resource utilization of Apis spp. (Hymenoptera: Apidae) of Bangladesh., 1995, xxviii + 294 pp. | |
    Keywords : foraging; honey bees; nectar; pollen; circadian rhythm
    Location : | Bangladesh
    Database : CABI, 19970201110

  • Potential of leguminous plants in containing congress grass II: effect of aqueous foliar extracts.
    Dhawan, S. R., Poonam Dhawan 1995

    Experiments were conducted to assess the effects of 24-h exposure of Parthenium [hysterophorus ] seeds to aqueous extracts of 14 leguminous species (Saraca indica, Moringa indica, Prosopis juliflora, Tephrosia purpurea, Cicer arietinum [chickpeas], Albizia lebbek [A. lebbeck ], Trigonella foenum-graecum [fenugreek], Delonix regia, Prosopis cineraria, Cassia siamea, Cassia fistula, Acacia auriculiformis, Acacia nilotica and Dalbergia sissoo ) on seed germination and seedling growth. Results indicated that max. inhibition of seed germination was achieved with S. indica (98.75%), followed by M. indica, P. juliflora and T. purpurea . Most inhibition of early seedling growth occurred with S. indica and D. nigra ; seedling fresh wt was reduced 66.67% by S. indica . A. nilotica and A. auriculiformis stimulated early seedling growth. Later seedling growth was inhibited most by S. indica , followed by M. indica, P. juliflora, D. regia, C. fistula, T. foenum-graecum and T. purpurea .
    Journal article
    World Weeds, 1995, Vol.2, No.2, pp.77-81, 16 ref. | Weed Control Research Lab., Department of Botany, Government P. G. College, Jind 126102, India. |
    Keywords : weeds; allelopathy; seed germination; growth rate
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19962303049

  • Allelopathic potential of leguminous plant species towards Parthenium hysterophorus L.
    Dhawan, S. R., Poonam Dhawan Gupta, S. K. 1998

    An investigation was undertaken to identify legumes in the local flora that are allelopathic towards Parthenium and can be exploited for obtaining cost effective, ecofriendly and biodegradable herbicides for effective biocontrol/management of this serious weed. Fourteen legumes were tested. 100% aqueous leachates of all the legumes except Pithecellobium dulce , decreased the Seed Germination (SG) and Vigour Index (VI) of the seedlings significantly. The allelopathic influence on SG and VI was most marked from the leachates of Delonix regia (-83.01 and -87.06), Cassia occidentalis (-75.77 and -78.22%), Albizia procera (-67.24 and -85.22%), Tephrosia purpurea (-53.20 and -66.63%) and Moringa indica (-47.44 and -60.09%). All the aqueous extracts studied had inhibitory effects. 100% extracts of Cassia occidentalis (absolute inhibition), Tephrosia purpurea (-88.30 and -93.82%). Trifolium alexandrinum (-87.79 and -90.43%), Delonix regia (-79.26 and -82.45%) Moringa indica (-74.37 and -84.41%), Albizia procera (-73.45 and -89.11%), Bauhinia variegata (-61.82 and -69.22%) and Prosopis cineraria (-55.76 and -65.42%) showed significant inhibition of SG and VI of the seedlings. It is concluded that even the crude aqueous foliar leachates and extracts of the above mentioned plant species could be exploited as herbicides for effective low cost management of Parthenium hysterophorus without any danger of pollution.
    Journal article
    Flora and Fauna (Jhansi), 1998, Vol.4, No.1, pp.9-12, 36 ref. Surya Publications, Jhansi, India | Weed Cont. Res. Lab, Govt. P.G. College, Jind, 126102, India. | 0971-6920
    Keywords : allelopathy; chemical control; herbicides; plant extracts; weeds; seed germination
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 20013001830

  • Allelopathic potential of leguminous plant species towards Parthenium hysterophorus L. (1) - effect of aqueous foliar leachates.
    Dhawan, S. R., Poonam Dhawan Gupta, S. K. 2001

    Fourteen crop and tree species, and wild bushes were tested for allelopathy towards Parthenium hysterophorus : chickpea cv. C-235, Trifolium alexandrinum cv. Mescavi, Trigonella foenum graecum cv. Kasuri, Acacia nilotica, Albizia procera, Bauhinia variegata, Delonix regia, Moringa indica, Parkinsonia aculeata, Pithecellobium dulce, Prosopis cineraria, Tamarindus indica, Cassia occidentalis and Tephrosia purpurea . Aqueous leachates (100%) from leaves of all tested species, except that of Pithecellobium dulce , decreased seed germination and vigour index of Parthenium hysterophorus . Allelopathy was strongest with leachates from D. regia, Cassia occidentalis, Albizia procera, Tephrosia purpurea and M. indica .
    Journal article
    Legume Research, 2001, Vol.24, No.4, pp.256-259, 24 ref. Agricultural Research Communication Centre, Karnal, India | Weed Control Research Lab, Govt. P.G. College, Jind, 126 102, India. | 0250-5371
    Keywords : allelopathy; non-wood forest products; weeds; herbicidal properties; plant extracts; botanical pesti
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 20023021000

  • Forest genetics -- research and application in Indian forestry -- I; II.
    Dogra, P. D., 1981

    A review in 2 parts. Part I covers: the genetic potential of indigenous species; approaches to tree improvement work in India; natural variation, selection and conservation of provenances with special reference to pines, teak and Moringa spp.; chromosome studies; variation in oleoresin yield and quality in pines; and the importance of information on reproductive biology. Part II covers: genetic control through seed, seed orchards, vegetative propagation, haploidy and agamospermy and intra- and interspecific hybridization of indigenous species.
    Journal article
    Indian Forester, 1981, Vol.107, No.4; 5, pp.191-219; 263-288, 171 ref. | National Bot. Res. Inst., Lucknow, UP, India. | 0019-4816
    Keywords : tree breeding; genetics; research; vegetative propagation; hybridization
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19820683143

  • Comparative studies on nutritive values of tender foliage of seedlings and mature plants of Moringa oleifera (lamk).
    D'Souza, J., Kulkarni, A. R. 1990

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Indian Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics, 1990, Vol.27, No.7, pp.205-212, 19 ref. | Department of Life Science, University of Bombay, Santacruz East, Bombay 400098, India. | 0022-3174
    Keywords : nutritive value; seedlings; medicinal plants
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19941409580

  • Comparative studies on nutritive values of tender foliage of seedlings and mature plants of Moringa oleifera Lam.
    D'Souza, J., Kulkarni, A. R. 1993

    Experimental analytical (chemical) data, and data from the literature are reported on the nutritive value of the foliage of this multipurpose tree, with reference to its use as fodder and in comparison with other edible leafy vegetables. Data are included on vitamin contents, and from rat feeding experiments.
    Journal article
    J.Econ.Tax.Bot., 17 (2) pp479-485. | Department of Life Science, University of Bombay, Santacruz East, Bombay 400098, India. | 0250-9768
    Keywords : leaves; vitamins; plant composition; fodder plants; seedlings; nutritive value
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19950610793

  • Evaluation of different fungal antagonists, plant extracts and oil cakes against Thanatephorus cucumeris causing banded blight of rie.
    Dubey, S. C., 1998

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Journal of Mycology and Plant Pathology. Dec. 28(3): 266-269. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • The quest for tolerant germplasm
    Duke, J.A., 1978

    (No abstract)
    Article in book
    p. 1?61. In: ASA Special Symposium 32, Crop tolerance to suboptimal land conditions. Am. Soc. Agron. Madison, WI. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Alley cropping to sustain yields
    ECHO, 1995

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    ECHO Development Notes, Issue 49 pp1-2. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Moringa oleifera Lam. - a new host of Ralstonia (Pseudomonas ) solanacearum E. F. Smith from India.
    Estelitta, S., Nair, P. V. Vilasini, T. N. Jayasree Sankar 1997

    R. solanacearum was isolated from bacterial ooze observed on M. oleifera in Kerala, India. This is the first report of R. solanacearum on this host.
    Journal article
    Bacterial Wilt Newsletter, 1997, No.14, p.6, 2 ref. | Communication Centre Mannuthy, Thrissur, Kerala, India. | 1030-8512
    Keywords : new host records; plant pathology
    Location : | India; Kerala
    Database : CABI, 19971006476

  • Utilizaci?n del marango (Moringa oleifera) como forraje fresco para ganado. Utilization of marango (Moringa oleifera ) as fresh forage for cattle.
    Foidl, Nikolaus, Mayorga, Leonardo V?squez, Wilfredo 1999

    In Nicaragua, research on the use of the marango tree (Moringa oleifera ) as fresh forage for cattle is being carried out. This tree has good nutritional characteristics in terms of its contents of protein, vitamins, fibre, energy, digestibility, and has a high yield of fresh biomass. It is planted at high densities as hedges or in plots planted from stakes. The plant material is harvested at 35- to 45-day intervals. Currently, feeding trials involving milk and beef cattle are being carried out without a decrease in weight or milk production of the animals.
    Conference paper; Journal article
    FAO Animal Production and Health Paper, 1999, No.143, pp.341-346, 6 ref. Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), Rome, Italy | Proyecto Biomasa, Managua, Nicaragua. Agroforestry for animal production in Latin America. Proceedings of an electronic conference, April-September, 1998. | 0254-6019, 92-5-304257-5
    Keywords : beef cattle; digestibility; forage; milk production; dairy cattle; nutritive value
    Location : http://www.fao.org/ag/aga/AGAP/FRG/Agrofor1/Foidl16.htm | Nicaragua
    Database : CABI, 20001420311

  • In vitro bioassay of some plant products against some fungal plant pathogens.
    Sitansu Pan, Deb, G. 1997

    In vitro antifungal properties of some Indian herbs were determined against fungal plant pathogens. The fungal pathogens tested were Alternaria solani , Helminthosporium oryzae [Cochliobolus miyabeanus ], Fusarium udum , Colletotrichum falcatum [Glomerella tucumanensis ], Rhizoctonia solani , Corticium rolfsii and Aspergillus niger . Extracts of neem (Azadirachta indica ) leaf powder had antifungal properties against Cochliobolus miyabeanus and G. tucumanensis . At the highest concentration tested (1000 ppm), haldi (Curcuma longa ) rhizome powder gave encouraging results against F. udum and Cochliobolus miyabeanus . Babla (Acacia nilotica ) bark powder had strong antifungal activity against Cochliobolus miyabeanus at the highest concentration evaluated. Sajina (Moringa oleifera ) leaf, seed and root powder also had some antifungal properties against Cochliobolus miyabeanus . However, Kataki (Pandanus odoratissimus ) had no antifungal effects at the concentrations tested.
    Journal article
    Indian Agriculturist, 1997, Vol.41, No.4, pp.277-285, 5 ref. | Department of Plant Pathology, Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya, Mohanpur-741252, West Bengal, India. | 0019-4336
    Keywords : plant pathogens; fungi; plant extracts; antifungal properties; chemical control
    Location : | West Bengal; India
    Database : CABI, 19991001859

  • Some insect pests of moringa (Moringa oleifera) in South India
    Sivagami, R., David; B.V. 1968

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    South Indian Horticulture 16:69-71 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Storage potential of moringa seeds.
    Sivasubramanian, K., Thiagarajan, C. P. 1997

    Moringa seed bulks were colour graded (black, brown, white or ungraded control) and stored in cloth or polyethylene bags for 1 year, after treatment with carbendazim (2 g/kg). Seeds were assessed every 2 months for moisture content, germination and vigour. Black seeds recorded a 6.7, 51.5 and 24.9 higher average germination percentage than brown, white and ungraded seeds, respectively. Seed vigour decreased gradually during storage, but vigour of black seeds was higher than that of brown, white and ungraded seeds at each stage of storage. Germination percentages of seeds were higher when stored in polyethylene bags than when stored in cloth bags, regardless of seed colour. Moisture content increased more rapidly in cloth bags than in polyethylene bags, which was associated with a more rapid decrease in vigour in cloth bags.
    Journal article
    Madras Agriculture journ. 84 (10) 618-620 | Department of Seed Technology, Agricultural College and Research Institute, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore 641 003, India. | 0024-9602
    Keywords : storage; carbendazim; moisture content; seed germination; seed longevity
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19980313348

  • Efficacy of plant extracts against Alternaria leaf blight of sunflower in vitro .
    Smita Ranjan, Lal, H. C. Ojha, K. L. 1999

    Out of 5 plant extracts tested against Alternaria alternata in vitro , Aegle marmelos leaf extract at 5000 micro g/ml showed minimum (30.00 mm) colony diameter and maximum (66.67 %) growth inhibition of A. alternata in comparison with the control. The growth inhibition percentage in other treatments (Azadirachta indica , Moringa pterygosperma [M. oleifera ], Tagetes erecta and Pongamia pinnata ) varied from 30.0-59.17 at 5000 micro g/ml. All the plant extracts were less effective at lower concentrations; there was a positive correlation between increase in concentration and growth inhibition percentage.
    Journal article
    Journal of Applied Biology, 1999, Vol.9, No.1, pp.93-94, 5 ref. | Department of Plant Pathology, Rajendra Agricultural University, Pusa, Samastipur 848 125, Bihar, India. |
    Keywords : plant pathogens; fungi; in vitro; fatty oil plants
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 20001007050

  • A comparative study of fungicidal compounds and plant extracts against Alternaria alternata .
    Rashmi, Yadav, B. P. Ojha, K. L. 1999

    An in vitro test indicated significant decreases in germination of A. alternata in different concentrations (10 to 200 p.p.m.) of Blitox-50 [copper oxychloride], Ridomil MZ-72 WP [(metalaxyl + mancozeb)], Bavistin 50 WP [carbendazim], Captaf 75% WP [captan], Indofil M-45 [mancozeb], and Kavach 75% WP [chlorothalonil]. Fungicidal properties in aqueous leaf extract of Ocimum basilicum and bulb extract of Allium sativum were found effective in complete suppression of germination of fungal spores at 4000 and 3000 p.p.m., respectively. Leaf extracts of Moringa pterygosperma [Moringa oleifera ] and Achyranthes aspera could inhibit germination to 35.7 and 25.4%, respectively at 4000 p.p.m.
    Journal article
    Journal of Applied Biology, 1998, Vol.8, No.2, pp.61-64, 17 ref. | Department of Plant Pathology, Rajendra Agricultural University, Pusa Samastipur 848125, India. |
    Keywords : plant extracts; germination; in vitro culture; chemical control; plant pathogens; fungi
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19991007384

  • Seed germination in moringa Pterygosperma
    Hasseb Mughal, M., Au G. Srivastava, P. S. Iqbal, M. 1998

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Acta botanica indica. [ Acta bot. indica. ] 1998 , vol. 26 , no 1 , pp. 61 - 65 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : INIST, 16890

  • Studies on the pollen viability and storage of drumstick (Moringa oleifera Lam.).
    Singh, R.K., Tiwari, R. Kumar, R. 1983

    Fertile pollen grains were 33.32-41.65 micro m; sterile pollen grains were 22.99-33.32 micro m. Pollen germination was highest in fresh pollen. Pollen viability after storage was best on a medium containing 6% sucrose and 15 p.p.m. boric acid for less than 24 h. Maximum pod set (31.26%) was obtained with hand pollination using fresh pollen.
    Journal article
    Haryana Journal of Horticultural Sciences, 1983, Vol.12, No.1/2, pp.30-35, 15 ref. | Agricultural Coll., Sabour, Bihar, India. | 0970-2873
    Keywords : pollination; sterility; storage; vegetables; tropical crops; oilseed plants
    Location : |
    Database : AGRICOLA, SB13 H3 CABI, 19851638071

  • Fruit-bearing forest trees: technical notes.
    Food and Agriculture Organization, 1982

    Notes are given on family, vernacular names, origin and distribution, ecology, botanical characteristics, cultural requirements, wood uses and food value of 43 species, in the context of the FAO forestry for local community development programme.
    Journal article
    FAO Forestry Paper, 1982, No.34, v + 177 pp., many ref. | | 0258-6150, 92-5-101218-0
    Keywords : community forestry
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19830686977

  • Growing Multipurpose Trees on Small Farms.
    Forestry/Fuelwood Research and Development Project., 1992

    (No abstract)
    Book
    Bangkok, Thailand: Winrock International. 195 + ixpp. (including 41 species fact cards). | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Cultivation of Moringa
    Fuglie, L., Sreeja, K.V. 2001

    (No abstract)
    Article in Book
    in Fuglie L. (ed), The Miracle Tree: The multiple attributes of Moringa. CTA, Wageningen / CWS, Dakar. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Economic production of Casuarina equisetifolia in agroforestry.
    George, M., Manivachakam, P. Pinyopusarerk, K.; Turnbull, J. W.; Midgley, S. J. (ed) 1996

    Growth, yield and economic data are reported from a successful intercropping trial with Casuarina equisetifolia and Moringa oleifera in Coimbatore District, Tamil Nadu, India.
    Conference paper
    Recent casuarina research and development. Proceedings of the Third International Casuarina Workshop, Da Nang, Vietnam, 4-7 March, 1996., 1996, pp.226-228, 10 ref. | Division of Forest Productivity and Agroforestry, Institute of Forest genetics and Tree Breeding, Coimbatore 641002, India. | 0-643-06009-X
    Keywords : forest trees; growth; economic analysis; intercropping; agrosilvicultural systems
    Location : | India; Tamil Nadu
    Database : CABI, 19980600583

  • Foraging pressure of the Nubian ibex Capra ibex nubiana an its effect on the indigenous vegetation of the En Gedi Nature Reserve, Israel.
    Hakham, E., Ritte, U. 1993

    Results are presented from a study from December 1978 to May 1981. Ibex in En Gedi preferred grazing and therefore browsing pressure on perennial plants depended on rainfall patterns. When browsing, principal food plants were Acacia raddiana, Ziziphus spina-christi, Salsola vermiculata, Pennisetum asperifolium and Moringa peregrina.
    Journal article
    Biological conservation.1993. v. 63 (1) p. 9-12. | Department of Genetics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904, Israel. | 0006-3207
    Keywords : nature reserves; grazing effects; introduced species; irrigation; animal behavior
    Location : | Israel
    Database : AGRICOLA, S900 B5 CABI, 19930667048

  • Character association and cultivar performance in drumstick.
    Hanchinamani, C. N., Magalageri, B. B. 1994

    Brief data are reported on the pod yield of 3 cultivars (local, 5/9 and 6/4) of drumstick [Moringa oleifera ] in relation to height growth, height of the first branch above the ground, angle of the first branch to the main stem, and number of branches per tree, of plants growing in the vegetable garden of the University of Agricultural Sciences at Dharwad, Karnataka, in 1991-92.
    Journal article
    Karnataka Journal of Agricultural Sciences, 1994, Vol.7, No.1, pp.77-78, 1 ref. | Division of Horticulture, UAS, Dharwad, India. |
    Keywords : edible species; variety trials; increment; growth; cultivars
    Location : | India; Karnataka
    Database : CABI, 19960606810

  • Productivity in relation to floral biology in drumstick (Moringa oleifera Lamk.).
    Hanchinamani, C. N., Madalageri, B. B. Prabhakar, A. S. N. 1994

    Studies are reported on two 5-year-old cultivars (local and 6/4) at the University of Agricultural Sciences at Dharwad, Karnataka, comparing flower shedding, pollen grain fertility, fruit set as influenced by bagging and hand or open pollination, and stigmatic receptivity.
    Journal article
    Karnataka Journal of Agricultural Sciences, 1994, Vol.7, No.1, pp.76-77, 1 ref. | Horticulture Division, University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad-580 005, India. |
    Keywords : flowering; pollination; fertility; cultivars; reproduction
    Location : | India; Karnataka
    Database : CABI, 19960606809

  • Response of drumstick cultivars to different nutrient levels.
    Hanchinamani, C. N., Madalageri, B. B. 1994

    An investigation on the nutrient requirements of 1-yr-old drumstick [Moringa oleifera ] cultivars in the orchard of the University of Agricultural Sciences at Dharwad, Karnataka, revealed that highest number (117) and weight (5.24 kg) of pods (used as a vegetable) per plant were recorded in selection 6/4 with the fertilizer combination of 250:125:125 g NPK per plant. However, a higher net return per rupees spent on fertilizers was obtained in selection 6/4 with 200:100:100 g NPK per plant. Uptake of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium was 5.40, 1.51 and 8.56 g per plant, respectively, in selection 6/4 with the fertilizer dose of 250:125:125 g NPK per plant.
    Journal article
    Karnataka Journal of Agricultural Sciences, 1994, Vol.7, No.1, pp.18-22, 2 ref. | University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad - 580 005, India. |
    Keywords : variety trials; plant nutrition; NPK fertilizers; crop yield; edible species; cultivars
    Location : | India; Karnataka
    Database : CABI, 19960606808

  • Effects of density levels and space restrictions on phasic features and energy budget in a tropical moth Eupterote mollifera
    Haniffa, M. A., Raj, T. P. Thanislaus, T. M. 1989

    Crowding and space restriction prolonged the larval (28.7 and 31.7 days) and pupal (34.7 and 34.0 days) periods in Eupterote mollifera on Moringa pterygosperma [M. oleifera ] in the laboratory. Maximum larval (339 and 347 mg) and pupal (352 and 459 mg) weights were observed for individuals reared at low density and high volume. Both crowding and volume effects resulted in a decrease in the length and breadth of the fore- and hind-wings. Values obtained for food consumption (389 and 674 mg) and assimilation (146 and 253 mg) were lowest for individuals reared in minimum volume and maximum density.
    Journal article
    Zeitschrift f?r Angewandte Zoologie, 1989, Vol.76, No.3, pp.369-376, 18 ref. | Research Department of Zoology, St. Xavier's College, Palayankottai-627 002, Tamil Nadu, India | 0044-2291
    Keywords : Insect pests; biology; environmental factors; oil plants; agricultural entomology
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19901176319

  • A possible pretreatment for seeds of tropical tree species
    Harsh, N. S. K., Ojha, B. M. 2000

    A seed pretreatment with 5% CMC (carboxy methyl cellulose) medium was found to enhance germination in the tropical tree species, Acacia catechu, A. nilotica, Albizia procera, Dalbergia sissoo and Moringa pterygosperma and increased root and shoot growth.
    Journal article
    Seed science and technology. 2000 , vol. 28 , no 2 , pp. 513 - 516 International Seed Testing Association, Bassersdorf, Switzerland | Tropical Forest Research Institute, P. O. - R.F.R.C. | 0251-0952
    Keywords : seed treatment; forest trees; seed germination; seedling growth
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 20003034694 INIST, 1663

  • Resultados de un ensayo de evaluaci?n de especies de zona seca. Results of a dry zone species evaluation trial.
    Higman, S., 1994

    This report summarises the method and results of a species evaluation trial of 19 native and 1 exotic dry zone species, conducted over three years on a single site in the Valle de Comayagua, Honduras. Assessments were made at 10, 23 and 36 months after establishment. Prior to the 36 month assessment, species were labelled according to end-use class: either 'multipurpose' (MPT) and/or 'timber'. Standard forestry mensuration techniques as well as specialised MPT assessment techniques were employed in the final assessment. Three MPT species, Leucaena leucocephala, Moringa oleifera and Gliricidia sepium , emerge as promising, both in terms of the standard measure of height and the alternative MPT measure of length. However a different pattern emerges when MPT species are ranked by cross-sectional area: Guazuma ulmifolia, Senna atomaria and Enterolobium cyclocarpum emerge as the best performers. Albizia saman [Samanea saman ] ranks top in the timber species in terms of both height and diameter at breast height.
    Journal article
    Serie Miscelanea de CONSEFORH, 1994, No.57, v + 24pp., 5 ref. | Proyecto Conservaci?n y Mejoramiento de los Recursos Forestales de Honduras, Apartado Postal No. 45, Siguatepeque, Honduras. |
    Keywords : species trials; forest trees; Senna
    Location : | Honduras
    Database : CABI, 19980612965

  • Seed storage behaviour: a compendium.
    Hong TD, Linington S Ellis RH. 1996

    (No abstract)
    Book
    Handbooks for Genebanks: No. 4.IPGRI. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Research to provide guidelines for future development of beekeeping in Bangladesh.
    International Bee Research Association, 1983

    An apiary of 2 Apis cerana colonies was established at each of 5 sites in rice-growing areas of Bangladesh, and records of foraging activity, colony strength and available bee forage were made at intervals of 2 weeks from 1 July 1985 to 30 June 1987. Samples of pollen loads and honey were collected for later examination. At each site, the amount of foraging for nectar reached its peak in December-January; at 3 sites a secondary peak occurred in February. Peaks of pollen collection tended to coincide with those of nectar collection. Foraging A. cerana were seen to visit 93 plant species, with many more bees seen foraging on Brassica napus than on any other species. Litchi chinensis, Cocos nucifera, Citrus grandis and Bombax ceiba received many visitors, and Moringa oleifera, Musa spp., Mikania scandens, Syzygium cuminii and Ziziphus mauritiana were also attractive. Species flowering and visited outside the main foraging period, which are valuable for colony maintenance, are listed. A mean of 3.0 kg honey/colony was harvested during the two seasons. Recommendations for planting bee forage are made, and it is envisaged that returns of 5 kg/colony (worth TK500) would be realistic. It is recommended that similar studies should be carried out in other areas of Bangladesh.
    Report
    Science and technology for development. 1st Programme. Tropical and subtropical agriculture. Research projects 1983-1986. Summaries of the final reports., 1989, pp.470-472 | | 92-9081-020-3
    Keywords : honey bees; foraging; Beekeeping; cultivation
    Location : | Bangladesh
    Database : CABI, 19900228199

  • Auxins in Moringa pterygosperma Gaertn. fruits.
    Iyer, R.I., Nagar, P.K. Sircar, P.K. 1981

    Fruits of M. pterygosperma [M. oleifera] elongate unusually rapidly. Young fruits, 30-40 cm long, yielded 4 auxin-like factors, 2 of which were identified as IAA and indole acetonitrile. Studies on fruits of different ages showed that auxin activity rose to a peak when they were 25-30 cm long and fell to a very low level at maturity (45-50 cm). [For earlier work see HcA 38, 1812.]
    Journal article
    Indian Journal of Experimental Biology, 1981, Vol.19, No.5, pp.487-489, 11 ref. | Calcutta University, Calcutta 700 019, India. | 0019-5189
    Keywords : development; medicinal plants; fatty oil plants; plant growth regulators
    Location : |
    Database : AGRICOLA, 442.8 IN2 CABI, 19810302356

  • Chapter 4. Cultivation of Moringa trees.
    Jahn, S.A.A., 1986

    The introduction to this chapter briefly describes the uses of Moringa oleifera (a multipurpose species) and other Moringa species. The status of M. oleifera in its country of origin is outlined and an account given of its introduction to the Sudan. Cultivation experiments on the species in Sudanese nurseries are described in detail and include germination studies, the development of seedlings to fruit-bearing trees (planting, tending, flowering, fruiting), and vegetative propagation from cuttings and air layering. The results of Sudanese experiments on the propagation of M. oleifera and 4 wild species (M. stenopetala, M. peregrina, M. drouhardii and M. longituba ) are discussed. An account is given of insect pests of M. oleifera in relation to defoliation, damage to buds and fruit, damage to the trunk and to cuttings.
    Book
    Schriftenreihe der GTZ, Deutsche Gesellschaft f?r Technische Zusammenarbeit, German Federal Republic, 1986, No.191, pp.233-298, 65 ref. | GTZ, Dag-Hammarskj?ld-Weg 1+2, D6236 Eschborn 1, German Federal Republic. | 3-88085-305-3
    Keywords : Silviculture; germination; Vegetative propagation; Insect pests; agricultural entomology
    Location : | Sudan; India
    Database : CABI, 19880621782

  • Comparative growth performance of some multipurpose trees and shrubs grown at Machakos, Kenya.
    Jama, B., Nair, P. K. R. Kurira, P. W. 1989

    Data are presented on the growth rates of 29 multipurpose species or varieties (Acacia albida, A. holosericeae [A. holosericea], A. salicana [A. salicina], A. saligna, A. stulmanii [A. stuhlmannii], A. tortilis, Balanites aegyptica [B. aegyptiaca], Cassia siamea, Casuarina equisetifolia, Grevillea robusta, Leucaena leucocephala - 8 varieties, Parkinsonia acuelata [aculeata], Prosopis juliflora, P. nigra, P. pallida, Samanea saman, Sesbania bispinosa, S. grandiflora, S. sesban, Tamarindus indica and Ziziphus mauritania [mauritiana] ) grown at the ICRAF field station at Machakos (a subhumid to semiarid climatic zone) for 6 yr. The study started in Oct. 1981 and used seedlings at least 6 month old. All were intercropped with maize and beans [Phaseolus vulgaris ] twice a year, and recommended fertilizer types and rates were applied to the crops. Exotic species such as Grevillea robusta, Sesbania grandiflora, Leucaena leucocephala, Cassia siamea and Sesbania sesban, some of which were outside their traditional climatic zones, had larger diameters, heights and stem volumes (sometimes up to 130% more) than some of the indigenous species. Several exotic and indigenous species gave such a poor performance (either because of low ecological adaptation and/or pest and browse damage) that they were deleted from the trial and growth data are not given. These were: Acacia mellifera, Atriplex nummularia, Calliandra calothyrsus, Cassia alata, Cordeuxia [Cordeauxia] edulis, Erythrina abyssinica and Moringa oleiferra [M. oleifera]. General ecological characteristics of some of the species tested are summarized in a table.
    Journal article
    Agroforestry Systems, 1989, Vol.9, No.1, pp.17-27, 23 ref. | International Council for Research in Agroforestry (ICRAF), PO Box 30677, Nairobi, Kenya. | 0167-4366
    Keywords : Broadleaves; Species trials; Agroforestry; Intercropping
    Location : | Kenya
    Database : CABI, 19900639900

  • Reclamation of mine wasteland by trees.
    Jha, M. N., Prinsley, R.T.; Swift, M.J. (ed) 1987

    A brief account of the successful reclamation of land mined for bauxite at Armarkantak in Madhya Pradesh. Seedlings of 10 species were planted in 1972 in 45-cm2 pits dug at 2 x 2 m spacing on land levelled by bulldozing. The pits were filled with soil from a nearby sal forest and additional compost. Moringa and Melaleuca leucadendron failed completely but the 8 other species survived well; these were Shorea robusta and Pongamia pinnata (indigenous species) and Acacia auriculiformis, Eucalyptus camaldulensis, Pinus caribaea, P. roxburghii, Grevillea robusta and G. pteridifolia (all species used successfully in Australian bauxite-mined areas). Various suggestions are made on factors contributing to the success of reclamation in mined areas.
    Conference paper
    Amelioration of soil by trees. A review of current concepts and practices, 1987, pp.62-66, 4 ref. | For. Res. Inst., Dehra Dun, UP, India. | 0-85092-300-X
    Keywords : Reclamation; Mined land; Afforestation; Land types; pines
    Location : | India; Madhya Pradesh
    Database : CABI, 19880624556

  • Studies on the performance of annual drumstick at coimbatore
    Kader Mohidean, M., Shanmugavelu, K.G. 1982

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    SHF, Vol 30(1) 95-98 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Relationships between preference, rumen degradability, gas production and chemical composition of browses
    Kaitho R.J., Nsahlai I.V. Williams B.A. Umunna N.N.; Tamminga S. van Bruchem J. 1997

    The aim of this work was to assess whether degradability, gas production or chemical constituents could predict the preference of browses. Forty tropical browse species leaves with a crude protein (CP) content ranging from 79 to 307 g kg^-1DM were used for this study. The neutral detergent fibre (NDF) ranged from 220 to 694 g kg^-1 DM, while acid detergent fibre (ADF) ranged from 146 to 523 g kg^-1 DM. The NDF-bound nitrogen (NDFN) and ADF-bound nitrogen were particularly high in Calliandra calothyrsus, Acacia polyacantha, Sesbania sesban, Acacia venosa and Acacia hockii. High levels of tannins were observed in Acacia species especially A. dolichocephala, A. hockii, A. microbotrya and A. salicina. High levels were also observed in Flemingia macrophyla and Leucaena pallida. The browse species differed (P < 0.05) in DM in sacco degradability coefficients. High potential degradability (PD) and effective degradability (ED) were observed in Sesbania spp, Moringa stenopetala, Indigofera arrecta, Chamaecytisus palmensis and Atriplex spp. The browses differed (P < 0.05) in asymptotic gas (Ag) production (ml g^-1 OM), but had similar (P > 0.05) times of incubation at which half of the asymptotic gas had been formed. Preference and DM intake were positively correlated (P < 0.01) to NDFN, but negatively correlated (P < 0.05) to NDF and ADF. The PD and Ag were negatively (P < 0.001) related to NDF, ADF and lignin. Total phenols (TP) and condensed tannins (CT) were negatively (P < 0.05) related to PD, ED and Ag. A positive correlation was observed between CT and NDF-bound condensed tannins (r = 0.55, P < 0.001) and, CT and TP (r = 0.40, P <0.01). Prediction equations were poor for DM intake and preference, moderate for gas production and good for potential and effective degradabilities. The phenolic components were more related to dry matter degradation and gas production than to preference and dry matter intake. NDFN and Ag made a positive contribution to both preference and DM intake. It was concluded that chemical constitutes such as N, NDF, NDFN, ADF and lignin are essential to predict the nutritive value of browses.
    Journal article
    Agroforestry Systems, 1997, vol. 39, no. 2, pp. 129-144(16) Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands | Kaitho R.J.[1][2]; Nsahlai I.V.[1]; Williams B.A.[2]; Umunna N.N.[1]; Tamminga S.[2]; van Bruchem J.[2] [1]International Livestock Research Institute, P.O. Box 5689, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; Wageningen Agricultural University, Wageningen Institute of Animal | 0167-4366
    Keywords : palatability; gas production; chemical composition; rumen digestion; antinutritional factors; sheep
    Location : | Nigeria
    Database : CABI, 19980610017 Ingenta, Online articles, SICI (online): 0167-4366392129144 INIST, 19350

  • Nitrogen in browse species: ruminal degradability and post-ruminal digestibility measured by mobile nylon bag and in vitro techniques.
    Kaitho, R. J., Umunna, N. N. Nsahlai, I. V. Tamminga, S. Bruchem, J. van 1998

    This study determined the N degradability and digestibility of rumen undegradable N using the mobile nylon bag (MNB) and a pepsin/pancreatin in vitro technique (IV) in 40 browse species. 30 Ethiopian highland sheep fitted with rumen cannulae were used. Six steers fitted with rumen cannulae were used in preparation of 16 and 24-h ruminal undegraded residues and 4 steers fitted with distal abomasal cannulae were used in MNB technique. The browses varied widely in N solubility (15-468 g/kg), potential degradability (223-976 g/kg), rate of degradation (0.13-24% h-1) and effective degradability (135-821 g/kg). The apparent N digestibility (ND) of the rumen undegraded residues differed significantly among browse species. No significant difference was observed in ND of 16 and 24-h residues. The ND of the 16-h residue varied from -218 to 759 g/kg and 169 to 851 g/kg for MNB and IV methods, respectively. Browse species with high tannin contents such as Acacia hockii , A. horrida , A. melanoxylon , A. persiciflora , A. salicina , A. saligna and Flemingia macrophylla had high rumen by-pass and a low ND, while Sesbania spp. and A. nilotica with low tannin contents underwent rapid and extensive DM and N degradation in the rumen. Acacia sieberiana , Chamaecytisus palmensis , Erythrina spp., Gliricidia sepium , Samanea saman [Albizia saman] and Enterolobium cyclocarpum had high proportions of protein escaping rumen degradation (BP) and with a high proportion of the by-pass protein digested in the intestine, therefore these browses had a high potential as protein supplements. The ND measured with the MNB were lower (P <0.001) than by the IV method. The correlation between MNB and IV was high (R 2 = 0.89, P <0.0001) as also indicated by the regression equation (SE in parentheses): MNB = -22.8 (4.55) + 1.0 (0.08)IV (RSD = 10.56, R 2 = 0.79, n=40, P <0.001). The intercept of the linear relationship obtained was different from zero while the slope was not different from unity. Multiple regression analysis suggested that some of the unexplained variation could be accounted for by either N, acid detergent fibre, total phenolics or neutral detergent fibre bound tannin concentrations in browses. It was concluded that the IV method was accurate for estimating digestibility of ruminally undegradable N and hence its use would considerably reduce the need for delicate surgery and the elaborate procedures involving the MNB technique.
    Journal article
    Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, 1998, Vol.76, No.4, pp.488-498, 43 ref. | International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), PO Box 5689, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. | 0022-5142
    Keywords : digestibility; rumen digestion; fodder
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19981410734

  • Rapid clonal propagation of Moringa oleifera Lam., using tissue culture.
    Kantharajah, A. S., Dodd, W. A. 1991

    A technique is described for the in vitro propagation of M. oleifera using nodal segments collected from a mature field-grown tree. An average of 22.1 plus or minus 6.3 shoots/plant were developed in the woody plant medium containing 2% sucrose, solidified with 0.8% agar and supplemented with 1 mg BA/litre. Root formation was readily achieved using MS basal medium with 0.5 mg NAA/litre. The resulting plantlets were transferred to soil and successfully grown in the greenhouse. Tissues from seedlings were found to be less useful as sources of explants for micropropagation than those from mature nodal segments from older trees.
    Journal article
    South Indian Horticulture, 1991, Vol.39, No.4, pp.224-228, 11 ref. | Faculty of Horticulture, University of Western Sydney, Hawkesbury, Richmond, NSW 2753, Australia. | 0038-3473
    Keywords : in vitro culture; vegetative propagation; oil plants; plant growth regulators
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19920314498

  • Note on the severe damage of moringa fruits by the fly Gitona sp. (Drosophilidae: Diptera)
    Kareem, A.A., Sadakathulla, S. Subramaniam, T.R. 1974

    Fruit flies infested the fruits of Moringa oleifera which then dried out at the tip and rotted.
    Journal article
    South Indian Horticulture, 1974, Vol.22, No.1/2, p.71, 1 ref. | Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore-641003, India. | 0038-3473
    Keywords : pests; fatty oil plants
    Location : | India
    Database : AGRICOLA, 80 SO825 CABI, 19750333643

  • How large bees, Bombus and Xylocopa (Apoidea Hymenoptera) forage on trees: optimality and patterns of movement in temperate and tropical climates.
    Kevan, P. G., 1990

    Large Bombus species foraging on Aesculus hippocastanum, A. octandra, Robinia pseudoacacia, Cladrastis lutea and Tilia sp. in temperate zones, and Xylocopa species foraging on Peltophorum pterocarpum, Moringa oleifera and Sarcotheca celebica in the tropics, showed similar behaviour. Both foraged upwards on inflorescences on the crowns of trees, laterally and upwards between inflorescences less than 15 cm apart, but downwards and laterally between inflorescences more than 20 cm apart. The observed patterns of inter- and intra-inflorescence foraging were energetically efficient.
    Journal article
    Ethology, Ecology and Evolution, 1990, Vol.2, pp.233-242 | Department of Environmental Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ont. N1G 2W1, Canada. |
    Keywords : Foraging
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19930232559

  • Session-3. Propagation of trees.
    Khosla, P. K., Chauhan, P. S.; Sehgal, R. N.; Jain, M. K.; Pal, M.; Sharma, G. K.; Raina, V.; Parmar, C.; Kumar, J.; Dua, I. S.; Nagpal, R.; Puri, S.; Singh, R. P.; Sharma, S. D.; Bajaj, Y. P. S. 1982

    Nine papers: Chauhan, P.S.; Sehgal, R.N. Propagation of forest trees by stem cuttings. 155-159 [5 ref.] Jain, M.K. Some physiological aspects of rooting of cuttings[s] in forest trees. 161-168 [6 ref.] Pal, M. Interaction between auxins and ethrel in root formation on stem cuttings of Populus robusta Schneid [P. 'Robusta'] 169-173 [8 ref.] Sharma, G.K.; Raina, V. Propagation techniques of Moringa oleifera Lam. 175-181 [7 ref.] Data on seed storage, treatment and germination and propagation by stem cuttings. Parmar, C.; Kumar, J. Studies on sexual and vegetative propagation of Murraya koenigii (Linn.) Spreng. 183-186 [5 ref.] Chauhan, P.S.; Dua, I.S. Effect of growth hormone on air-layering of some forest trees of sub-Himalayan tract. 187-191 [6 ref.] Nagpal, R.; Puri, S.; Khosla, P.K. Propagation of Olea europaea Linn. by air-layering. 193-199 [7 ref.] Singh, R.P.; Sharma, S.D. Standardization of propagation methods for top working of wild olive trees (Olea cuspidata Wall.) 201-203 [4 ref.] A comparison of 5 methods of budding and grafting. Bajaj, Y.P.S. Cryopreservation of germplasm of forest trees. 205-214 [53 ref.].
    Conference paper
    Symposium proceedings: Improvement of forest biomass., 1982, pp.153-214, 101 ref. Indian Society of Tree Scientists, H.P. Agricultural University, Solan, India | Dep. For., H.P. Agricultural Univ., S.N.S. Nagar-173 230, Solan, India. |
    Keywords : Vegetative propagation; shoot cuttings; air layering; germination; Tree breeding
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19850699907

  • Recherches sur la culture de Moringa oleifera Lam. au Togo (Research on Moringa oleifera Lam. cultivation in Togo)
    Kokou, K., Joet, T. Broin, M. Aidam, A. 2001

    M. oleifera is a multipurpose tree widely grown in Africa. Its seeds contain high quality edible oil and the residual presscakes from oil extraction can be used in natural water purification processes. However, M. oleifera is not intensively cultivated in Togo. As a basis for a plantation project, comparative studies of the agronomic potential of M. oleifera seeds from different origins (Togo, Senegal, Niger and Madagascar) and of the regeneration capacity of cuttings, depending on their size and maturity, was carried out during 1998 at Lome, Togo. The best germination rate was obtained for seeds buried at a 2-cm depth. Seeds from Madagascar had the highest germination rate (100%), while those from Togo had the lowest (80%); however, seedlings from Togo had far better growth. Cuttings exhibited high sensitivity to dehydration and termites. Cuttings longer than 1.5 m had the best survival rate and those which were lignified were more resistant than those which were chlorophyllous.
    Journal article
    Cahiers Agricultures, 2001, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 131-134 John Libbey Eurotext, Montrouge, France | | 1166-7699
    Keywords : cuttings; growth; lignin; oilseed plants; seed germination
    Location : http://www.john-libbey-eurotext.fr/articles/agr/10/2/131-3/ | Madagascar; Niger; Senegal; Togo
    Database : CABI, 20013078097 Ingenta, Uncover plus

  • A new disease of drumstick.
    Kshirsagar, C. R., D'Souza, T. F. 1989

    A rot of the edible pods of Moringa oleifera in Maharashtra was caused by Drechslera [Cochliobolus ] hawaiiensis, a previously unreported host. Pathogenicity was confirmed experimentally.
    Journal article
    Journal of Maharashtra Agricultural Universities, 1989, Vol.14, No.2, pp.241-242, 5 ref. | Mahatma Phule Agric. Univ., Rahuri 413722, India. | 0378-2395
    Keywords : Records; hosts; plant pathology; plant pathogenic fungi
    Location : | Maharashtra; India
    Database : CABI, 19901142783

  • First report of Ascotis selenaria imparata Walk. (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) as a pest of Moringa pterygosperma Gertn.
    Kulkarni, N., Shamila Kalia Sambath, S. Joshi, K. C. 1996

    This report of Ascotis selenaria imparata [A. imparata] as a pest of Moringa pterygosperma [M. oleifera] is from the nursery of the Tropical Forest Research Institute at Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh, where the pest was observed in 1993-95. An outline is given of its biology and (chemical) control.
    Journal article
    Indian Forester, 1996, Vol.122, No.11, pp.1075-1076, 3 ref. | Forest Entomology Division, Tropical Forest Research Institute, Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh, India. | 0019-4816
    Keywords : forest trees; plant pests; pest control; insect pests; forest nurseries
    Location : | India; Madhya Pradesh
    Database : CABI, 19970610002

  • Effect on yield of growing agricultural crops between multipurpose trees in an agroforestry system.
    Kushwaha, H. S., Mathur, C. M. 1995

    In field trials in 1990-93 at Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh, the effects were studied of growing field crops under 8 m rows of Leucaena leucocephala, Eucalyptus tereticornis and Moringa oleifera spaced 4 m apart with 2 m between trees. There were no significant effects on crop yields in the first 2 years, but in the 3rd year fodder sorghum and mustard [Brassica juncea ] yields were reduced. Black gram [Vigna mungo ] grown under M. oleifera or L. leucocephala gave similar yields to the control. Soyabeans were found to be unsuitable for growing under these trees.
    Journal article
    Bhartiya Krishi Anusandhan Patrika, 1995, Vol.10, No.3, pp.101-104, 3 ref. | College of Agriculture, JNKVV, Gwalior 474002, Madhya Pradesh, India. | 0303-3821
    Keywords : agroforestry; alley cropping; agrosilvicultural systems; crop yield
    Location : | India; Madhya Pradesh
    Database : CABI, 19960703812

  • The use of shrubs and tree fodders by nonruminants.
    Limcangco-Lopez, P. D., Devendra, C. (ed) 1989

    The use of plant leaves as a protein source for non-ruminants is reviewed. Shrub and tree leaves, leaf vines, grasses, and algae and other water plants may contain, on a dry weight basis, 20-30% crude protein, 12-18% crude fibre, and xanthophyll 500-650 mg/kg. Plant leaves are usually processed into leaf meals. If processed properly, leaf meals are good pigmenting agents because of the presence of several xanthophylls. Among leaf meals, leucaena (Leucaena leucocephala ) and cassava (Manihot esculenta ) leaf meals are most popular. Others, such as Trema orientalis, Morus indica, Moringa oleifera and Sesbania rostrata, are potentially useful, but require further study of their nutrient availability. The use of leaf meals in feeds is limited by their high fibre content and, in some cases, by toxins or metabolic inhibitors. These limitations can be overcome by extracting protein from leaves; this yields a product high in protein, low in fibre, and without residual toxins. This leaf protein concentrate has a higher feeding value than leaf meals and can be included at high levels as a substitute for soyabean oilmeal. Interest in the production of leaf proteins has been slow, mainly for economic reasons. Fresh green leaves of shrubs and trees are used in small quantities for pigs and for feeding to poultry in confinement.
    Journal article
    International Development Research Centre, 1989, No.276e, pp.61-75, 45 ref. | Institute of Animal Science, College of Agriculture, University of the Philippines at Los Ba?os, College, Laguna, Philippines. |
    Keywords : Leaf meal; livestock feeding; Leaf protein concentrate; Fodder
    Location : | Indonesia; Developing Countries
    Database : CABI, 19911434895

  • Evaluation of insecticides for the management of moringa fruit fly.
    Logiswaran, G., 1993

    Field studies carried out in Madurai, Tamil Nadu, India, during 1991 with dichlorvos and fenthion both at 0.04% showed that fenthion in particular significantly reduced incidence of Gitona sp. in Moringa fruits and resulted in greater yields compared with untreated controls.
    Journal article
    Madras Agricultural Journal, 1993, Vol.80, No.12, pp.698-699 | Agricultural College and Research Institute, Madurai, Tamil Nadu, India. | 0024-9602
    Keywords : chemical control; insecticides; yields; fatty oil plants
    Location : | Tamil Nadu; India
    Database : CABI, 19951113701

  • Utilisation of some of plantation, agro-forestry and social forestry species for the production of dissolving pulps.
    Madan, R. N.., Tandon, B 1991

    Data are presented on the proximate chemical analysis of the raw materials, pulping conditions, bleaching of unbleached pulps, and physico-chemical analysis of dissolving pulps produced from 12 species using the pre-hydrolysed sulfate process. The species were Eucalyptus globulus, E. grandis, Eucalyptus hybrid [E. tereticornis], Pinus taeda, P. montezumae, P. caribaea, Sesbania aculeata, S. aegyptiaca [S. sesban], Moringa oleifera, Prosopis juliflora, Leucaena leucocephala and Grevillea robusta. Details are also given of the manufacture of viscose rayon fibre from Grevillea robusta dissolving pulp at a pilot plant at the Birla Research Institute, Nagda, Madhya Pradesh, and the strength characteristics of the fibre produced are compared with those of commercial rayon. An outline is given of the status of the Indian rayon grade pulp industry.
    Journal article
    Indian Forester, 1991, Vol.117, No.1, pp.29-36, 16 ref. | Forest Products Division, Forest Research Institute, Dehra Dun, UP, India. | 0019-4816
    Keywords : Broadleaves; Textiles; Cellulose; utilization; Multipurpose trees
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19930665440

  • Postharvest diseases of perishables in West Bengal I: new host records and a new fungus from India.
    Mandal, N. C., Dasgupta, M. K. 1984

    The results are tabulated of a 2 yr survey of markets in West Bengal. New host records included Aspergillus aculeatus on Phyllanthus emblica, Spondias mangifera and Ziziphus jujuba ; Botryodiplodia theobromae on pear; Cylindrocladium parvum on Spondias mangifera ; Mucor circinelloides and Rhizopus rhizopodiformis on tomato; R. oryzae and Fusarium acuminatum [Gibberella acuminata ] on drumstick [Moringa ]; R. stolonifer on banana; Pestalotiopsis versicolor on guava and Ceratocystis paradoxa on potato bean tuber [Apios tuberosa ]. New host records included R. oryzae on carrot, grapevine and pea; Curvularia lunata [Cochliobolus lunatus ] on Eugenia formosa ; F. solani on carrot and potato; Alternaria alternata on bitter gourd [Momordica charantia ] and Botryodiplodia theobromae on ber [Z. mauritiana ]
    Journal article
    Indian Journal of Mycology and Plant Pathology, 1983, Vol.13, No.1, pp.73-77, 6 ref. | Pl. Path. Lab., Palli Siksha Sadan Visva-Bharati, Sriniketan-731236, India. | 0303-4097
    Keywords : postharvest decay; biodeterioration; plant pathology
    Location : | West Bengal; India
    Database : CABI, 19851308158

  • A new disease of Moringa oleifera in India.
    Mandokhot, A. M., Fugro, P. A. Gonkhalekar, S. B. 1994

    Fusarium pallidoroseum is reported for the first time as the causal agent of twig canker on M. oleifera , following its isolation and identification at Wakawali, Maharashtra India, during Jun. 1992.
    Journal article
    Indian Phytopathology, 1994, Vol.47, No.4, p.443 | Central Experiment Station, Wakawali 415711, India. | 0367-973X
    Keywords : oilseed plants; plant diseases; plant pathogens; fungi
    Location : | India; Maharashtra
    Database : CABI, 19952306660

  • High density multi species cropping system in coconut garden.
    Marimuthu, R., Athmanathan, U. Mohan, S. 2001

    field experiment was conducted in Tamil Nadu, India, during 1994-98, to develop a suitable multi-species cropping system in an old coconut garden. Four cropping systems were tested: coconut (sole crop; model I); coconut + nutmeg + banana cv. Poovan + annual moringa [Moringa oleifera ] + elephant foot yam [Amorphophallus spp.] + bitter gourd [Momordica charantia ] (model II); coconut + clove + betelvine + banana cv. Poovan + curry leaf [Murraya koenigii ] + colocasia (model III); and coconut + mango + pepper [?Capsicum ] + banana cv. Poovan + annual moringa + sirukizhangu (Coleus parviflorus [Coleus rotundifolius ]) + bhendi [Abelmoschus esculentus ] (model IV). In terms of high coconut yield, net income, profitability and benefit : cost ratio, the best cropping system was model IV.
    Journal article; Conference paper
    South Indian Horticulture, 2001, Vol.49, No.Special, pp.34-36, 2 ref. South Indian Horticultural Association, Coimbatore, India | Changing scenario in the production systems of horticultural crops. Proceedings of a National Seminar, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India, 28-30 August 2001. Coconut Research Station, Veppankulam - 614 906, Thanjavur (Dist), India. | 0038-3473
    Keywords : cost benefit analysis; crop yield; cropping systems; profitability
    Location : | India; Tamil Nadu
    Database : CABI, 20013163200

  • Techniques and plants for the tropical subsistence farm.
    Martin, F. W., Ruberte, R. M. 1980

    This publication provides advice on planning and maintaining a subsistence farm under tropical conditions, with sections on vegetables and cereals, trees for various uses and forage crops for livestock. Many crop plants of horticultural interest are discussed and include the following less common spp.: (1) foliage eaten as a vegetable: Basella alba, Celosia argentea, Cnidoscolus chayamansa, Moringa oleifera (also grown for seed oil and fruit), Lactuca indica, Morinda citrifolia and Sauropus androgynus; and (2) fruit trees: Pouteria campechiana and Tamarindus indica.
    Journal article
    Agricultural Reviews and Manuals, Science and Education Administration, United States Department of Agriculture, 1980, No.ARM-S-8, 56 pp., 34 ref. | CATIE, Turrialba, Costa Rica. |
    Keywords : vegetables; fruit crops; cultural methods; tropical crops
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19810393269

  • Evaluation of some live standards for black pepper
    Mathew, T., Kumar, B. M. Babu, K. V. S. Umamaheswaran, K. 1996

    In a field trial in 1988-91 at Thiruvazhamkunnu, Kerala, Piper nigrum cv. Karimunda vines were trained on the tree crops Moringa oleifera, Thespesia populnea, Garuga pinnata, Erythrina stricta, E. lithosperma, E. indica and Gliricidia sepium . Growth characters and yield attributes of pepper were not significantly affected by the different standards. However the highest vine height, number of leaves, number of nodes, leaf area index, number of spikes and black pepper yield were obtained when vines were trained on G. pinnata , whereas training vines on G. sepium gave the lowest yield. Among the trees, vegetative growth was greatest in G. sepium . Since G. pinnata produced high values for radial growth, bole volume, foliage and branch wood biomass without hindering pepper growth, it was considered an ideal live standard for pepper.
    Journal article
    Journal of Plantation Crops, 1996, Vol.24, No.2, pp.86-91, 11 ref. | All India Co-ordinated Research Project on Agro Forestry, Livestock Research Station, Kerala Agricultural University, Thiruvazhamkunnu, Palghat, Kerala, India. | 0304-5242
    Keywords : plant training; staking; support trees; agrosilvicultural systems
    Location : | India; Kerala
    Database : CABI, 19970308653

  • Amaranth to Zai Holes : Ideas for growing food under difficult conditions
    Meitzner, L., Price, M. 1996

    (No abstract)
    Book
    ECHO, North Fort Myers, Florida | |
    Keywords :
    Location : www.echonet.org/tropicalag/aztext/index.htm |
    Database :

  • Six new species of Aculus Keifer (1959) (Eriophyidae: Acarina) from south India.
    Mohanasundaram, M., 1984

    Six species in the genus Aculus are described from the leaves of various plants in Karnataka and Tamil Nadu, India, including A. bangalorensis sp. n. from Ficus sp., A. ficivagrans sp. n. from F. benghalensis, A. leptadeniae sp. n. from Leptadenia reticulata, A. montanae sp. n. from Diospyros montana and A. pterygospermae sp. n. from Moringa pterygosperma [M. oleifera ].
    Journal article
    Mysore Journal of Agricultural Sciences, 1984, Vol.18, No.1, pp.22-26, 7 ref. | Cashew Res. Sta., Vriddhachalam 606001, India. | 0047-8539
    Keywords : taxonomy; new species; trees; agricultural entomology
    Location : | India; Tamil Nadu; Karnataka
    Database : CABI, 19860536620

  • Correlation studies in annual drumstick (Moringa pterigosperma Goertn.).
    Mohideen, M. K., Shanmugavelu, K. G. 1983

    Correlation coefficients for fruit yield/plant and six yield-related characters are presented for 140 plants of the Tamil Nadu vegetable crop M. pterigosperma (M. oleifera ). Fruits/plant and branches/plant directly affected yield while low to medium stature and height of first branch from the base were also important.
    Journal article
    South Indian Horticulture, 1983, Vol.31, No.1, pp.43-44, 1 ref. | Fac. Hort., Tamil Nadu Agric. Univ., Coimbatore 3, India. | 0038-3473
    Keywords : yield components; yields; correlation; fatty oil plants; oilseed plants
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19841630101

  • Drip irrigation in annual moringa [Moringa oleifera ].
    Moorthy, V. R., Santhanabosu, S. Duraisamy, V. K. Rajagopal, A. 1994

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Madras Agricultural Journal, 1994, Vol.81, No.12, pp.678-679, 2 ref. | Water Technology Centre, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore 641 003, India. | 0024-9602
    Keywords : trickle irrigation; vegetables; irrigation systems
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19960307827

  • Seasonal incidence of moringa fruit fly, Gitona sp.
    Murthy, J. N. A., Regupathy, A. 1992

    The population dynamics of Gitona sp. on annual moringa [Moringa oleifera ] were investigated in Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, in 1984-85. The annual form of this popular vegetable had recently been introduced to cultivation in southern India and Gitona sp., previously regarded as a minor pest, had become more important. Gitona sp.-damaged fruits were recognised in the initial stages of infestation by the presence of gummy exudates, in association with eggs laid in the grooves between the ridges of the fruits, and by drying of the fruits in later stages. Gummy exudates were also observed following feeding by Oxycetonia versicolor and Anatona stillata . Gitona sp. were most numerous in August-September 1984, when 48-49% of fruit were damaged. Incidence decreased to 13-20% in November-December. A slight increase in January-February 1985, when 23.4% of fruits were damaged, was followed by another decrease in March-June. Incidence of Gitona sp. was negatively correlated with maximum temperature and hours of sunshine, and positively correlated with relative humidity and sunshine of the previous month.
    Journal article
    South Indian Horticulture, 1992, Vol.40, No.1, pp.43-48, 5 ref. | Centre for Plant Protection Studies, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore 641 003, Tamil Nadu, India. |
    Keywords : insect pests; population dynamics; agricultural entomology
    Location : | India; Tamil Nadu; Asia
    Database : CABI, 19951100177

  • New records and damage of flower thrips in the introduced tree species of arid and semi-arid region.
    Murugesan, S., Shivesh Kumar 1996

    A survey was carried from 1 November 1995 to 31 March 1996 in 3 areas of Jodhpur, Rajasthan, to identify flower thrips infesting 4 introduced (native) tree species (Ziziphus mauritiana, Parkinsonia aculeata, Moringa oleifera and Cassia siamea ). Five thrip species were recorded damaging the trees - Megalurothrips distalis, Thrips tabaci, Frankliniella dampti [F. schultzei] and Dendrothrips bisponosus [Scirtothrips bispinosus] . T. tabaci caused extensive damage to C. siamea , and Megalurothrips distalis was found particularly on Moringa oleifera (a new host record).
    Journal article
    Indian Forester, 1996, Vol.122, No.9, pp.854-855, 5 ref. | Division of Forest Protection, Arid Forest Research Institute, Jodhpur (Rajasthan), India. | 0019-4816
    Keywords : plant pests; new host records; introduced species; agricultural entomology
    Location : | India; Rajasthan
    Database : CABI, 19970604348

  • Role of flower colour of arid and semi-arid tree species and its effect on insect colonization.
    Murugesan, S., Sundararaj, R. Shivesh Kumar 1996

    The pigments responsible for flower colour are essentially flavonoids located in the cell vacuoles and carotenoids in the chloroplast. Flavonoids impart cyanic colours, while carotenoids provide yellow, orange and red cues, influencing host location by insects. The flavonoid pigments present in the flowers of Tecomella undulata, Parkinsonia aculeata, Cassia siamea and Moringa oleifera (arid zone species from Rajasthan) were identified using thin-layer chromatography. Details are tabulated of their spectral characteristics, and the corresponding flower colours. The flavonoids are known to act as feeding stimulants in insect groups in arid and semiarid regions, and some published data on this topic are mentioned.
    Journal article
    Indian Journal of Environment and Toxicology, 1996, Vol.6, No.2, pp.89-91, 13 ref. | Division of Forest Protection Arid Forest Research Institute New Pali Road, Jodhpur - 342 005, India. |
    Keywords : arid zones; semiarid zones; flavonoids; carotenoids; pollination; plant composition
    Location : | India; Rajasthan
    Database : CABI, 19970607106

  • Perennial vegetables for your kitchen gardens.
    Muthukrishnan, C. R., Ramadas, S. 1974

    Notes on the characteristics and culture of agathi (Sesbania grandiflora), basella (B. alba and B. rubra), breadfruit (Artocarpus hirsuta), bananas, chekurmanis (Sauropus andrognus), chow chow (Sechium edule), coccinea (Coccinea indica), Ceylon spinach (Talinum sp.) and drumstick (Moringa oleifera).
    Journal article
    Indian Horticulture, 1974, Vol.19, No.2, pp.11-12 | Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, India. | 0019-4875
    Keywords : breadfruits; bananas; cultural methods; vegetables; tropical crops
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19750331926

  • The culture of drumstick in South India
    Muthusamy, S., 1954

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    South Indian Horticulture 2: 18-21 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Status report on domestication and commercialization of non-timber forest products in agroforestry systems.
    Mwamba, C. K., 1996

    Zambia covers an area of about 750000 km2 of which about 54% is still covered by natural woodland broadly classified into 18 different forest types. These forests contain numerous tree (woody) species which have provided local communities with food, medicines and other non-timber products since time immemorial. Despite the importance of these forests for their multipurpose products, very limited scientific research has been directed at their assessment, development, and possible domestication or commercialization of the products. The Tree Improvement Research Centre of the National Council for Scientific Research (Zambia) recognized the need for the development and utilization of underutilized forest crops from the wild populations and initiated studies on forest fruit trees in 1976 (4 species were selected - Uapaca kirkiana, Ricinodendron rautanenii, Parinari curatellifolia and Anisophyllea boehmii ), on medicinal plants in 1984 (research has centred on the molluscicidal plant Phytolacca dodecandra ), and on industrial oil crops in 1990 (18 aromatic plants including Melaleuca spp., Rosmarinus officinalis and Pelargonium sp.; and 5 non-edible oilseed crops including Moringa oleifera and Jatropha curcas ). This paper reports on the current status of these studies. For the forest fruit trees, it has been shown that (1) potentially valuable tree species from wild populations can be domesticated and their variable traits improved for higher yield and better quality products, (2) these products could be commercialized, and (3) maize and beans could be cropped between respaced trees in monocultures of Uapaca kirkiana (converted from the natural forest stand), although soil fertility was a limiting factor here.
    Journal article
    Information Bulletin for Developing Countries, 1996, No.Summer, pp.17-21 | Tree Improvement Research Centre, National Council for Scientific Research, PO Box 21210, Kitwe, Zambia. |
    Keywords : medicinal plants; oil plants; intercropping; non-wood forest products; domestication; agrosilvicultu
    Location : | Zaire; Zambia
    Database : CABI, 19960610376

  • A study of two honey plants, Antigonon leptopus Hook. and Moringa pterigosperma Gaertn.
    Nair, P. K. K., Singh, K. N. 1974

    This study was planned to provide a working procedure for the screening of possible honey plants. In field studies, Apis mellifera and A. cerana indica were seen visiting the pink flowers of the climber A. leptopus, and also collecting nectar and pollen from the flowers of M. pterigosperma, a softwood tree. Flower morphology and pollen grains of both species are described. Moringa flowers contained 0.90% of reducing sugars, and 11.81% of non-reducing sugars. Moringa flowers and fruit are used as vegetables in India; as different individuals of the species flower at different times between December and February in India, it could be usefully planted for bee forage. P. Walker
    Journal article
    Indian Journal of Horticulture, 1974, Vol.31, No.4, pp.375-379, 7 ref. | Natn. Botanic Gardens, Lucknow, India. | 0019-5251
    Keywords : forage; flowers; pollen; production; ornamental plants; essential oil plants
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19770205823

  • Effects of eucalyptus and casuarina on the yield of intercrops in agroforestry systems.
    Swaminathan, C., Robin, S. Kannan, K. Malarvizhi, D. Dhanakodi, C. V. 1999

    In field trials conducted at Pudukkottai, India, during 1990-95, the yields of annual moringa (Moringa oleifera ) cv. PKM 1, bitter gourd (Momordica charantia ) cv. CO 1, cluster beans cv. Pusa, swordbeans (Canavalia gladiata ) cv. Local and cowpeas cv. CO 1 were assessed when intercropped with Eucalyptus tereticornis and Casuarina equisetifolia . Six-month-old seedlings of the tree species were planted at 4 x 1 m spacing and the intercrops were sown between them. The growing of intercrops did not influence the growth of the tree species, but vegetable yields declined from 3.92 t/ha to 0.014 t/ha in Eucalyptus tereticornis plots and from 4.96 t/ha to 0.089 t/ha in Casuarina equisetifolia . Eucalyptus tereticornis proved more inhibitory to crops than Casuarina equisetifolia . Swordbean was found most suitable for intercropping with both tree species. Bioassays revealed that germination and root and shoot length of the intercrops were suppressed by Eucalyptus tereticornis bark leachate. Leachates of Eucalyptus tereticornis proved more inhibitory to the germination of test crops than Casuarina equisetifolia .
    Journal article
    Allelopathy Journal, 1999, Vol.6, No.2, pp.251-260, 10 ref. | National Pulses Research Centre, Vamban colony - 622 303, Pudukkottai, Tamil Nadu, India. | 0971-4693
    Keywords : agroforestry; intercrops; crop yield; bioassays; seed germination; allelopathy
    Location : | India; Tamil Nadu
    Database : CABI, 19990611426

  • Planting Moringa .
    Vinod Kumar, 1993

    A brief account of the silvicultural characters and silviculture of Moringa oleifera (a multipurpose tree) in India.
    Journal article
    Vaniki Sandesh, 1993, Vol.17, No.2, pp.5-6 | Arid Forest Research Institute, Jodhpur, India. |
    Keywords : silviculture
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19950607270

  • Moringa (drumstick) - an ideal tree for social forestry: growing conditions and uses - Part I.
    Nautiyal, B. P., Venhataraman, K. G. 1987

    Notes are given on the growing conditions, flowering, fruiting and growth characteristics, silviculture, propagation, diseases, uses and chemistry of Moringa oleifera. All parts of the tree are considered medicinal and are used in the treatment of ascites, rheumatism, snake bites and as a cardiac stimulant. Roots are used as a condiment or garnish, leaves as cattle fodder and in the treatment of scurvy, catarrh, wounds and as an emetic, seed oil as an edible oil and for lighting and in cosmetics, and the stem gum exudate in calico printing and medicinally. The wood has suitable characteristics for pulp, paper and cellophane and textile production. Chemical data are given for roots, leaves, flowers, pods and seed oil. The leaves are rich in vitamins A and C.
    Journal article
    Myforest, 1987, Vol.23, No.1, pp.53-58, 8 ref. | National Bank for Agric. & Rural Devel., Express Bldg., Bangalore-1, India. |
    Keywords : Social forestry; Plant composition; Medicinal properties; silviculture
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19880621296

  • Fodder trees in Himachal Pradesh.
    Negi, S. S., 1977

    Data are tabulated on the nutritional value and palatability of 28 trees (with Latin and vernacular names). The possibility of converting tree leaves into a protein-rich meal is briefly discussed.
    Journal article
    Indian Forester, 1977, Vol.103, No.9, pp.616-622, 14 ref. | Indian Vet. Res. Inst., Patampur, Himachal Pradesh, India. | 0019-4816
    Keywords : foliage; products; fodder; minor forest products;
    Location : | Himachal Pradesh; India
    Database : CABI, 19780644539

  • Field incidence of bark-feeding caterpillar Aetherastis circulata (Meyr) on different alternative host plants and its control.
    Nehru, C. R., Jayarathnam, K. et al. 1987

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Pesticides 21(7): 39-40. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Effect of waterlogging on some forest plants.
    Nema, A. G., Khare, A. K. 1992

    Brief data are reported on the appearance of damage symptoms (drying and drooping, and days to first symptom development) and mortality following waterlogging of 13 species of young (12-20 months old) forest tree species growing in the experimental area of the Department of Forestry, JNKVV, Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh, during the rainy season of 1990. Root examination of the affected plants showed that there were no disease organisms present during the early stages of the disorder, suggesting that damage was caused by asphyxiation. Leucaena leucocephala, Melia azedarach, Moringa oleifera, Syzygium cumini and Tectona grandis were highly susceptible, while Azadirachta indica, Acacia nilotica, Eucalyptus tereticornis, Dendrocalamus strictus, Dalbergia sissoo, Acacia auriculiformis and Terminalia arjuna were highly resistant. Sesbania sesban was moderately susceptible.
    Journal article
    Journal of Tropical Forestry, 1992, Vol.8, No.2, pp.187-188, 1 ref. | Department of Forestry, Jawaharlal Nehru Krishi Vishwa Vidyalaya, Jabalpur-482 004, India. | 0970-1494
    Keywords : plant water relations; broadleaves; bamboos; waterlogging; damage
    Location : | India; Madhya Pradesh
    Database : CABI, 19940602810

  • Insect pollination of the moringa plant Moringa concanensis Nimmo Linn.
    Palanichamy, P. S., Baskaran, S. Mohandoss, A. 1995

    In a study carried out near Sivakasi, Tamil Nadu, in July-October, 1993, the moringa tree, Moringa concanensis , was found to be visited by 8 insect species. The relative abundance, pollen deposition and time spent at flowers by each species showed that the bumble bee Bombus sp., the little bee Apis florea , and the black ant Camponotus compressus , were the major pollinators of moringa. The diurnal activity of Bombus sp. and A. florea on sunny days showed a negative correlation with temperature and positive correlation with humidity. On cloudy days these 2 pollinators showed both negative and positive correlation with temperature and humidity. The pollen depletion from anthers of the moringa flowers by Bombus sp. and A. florea was more at about 1000 hours and less at about 1600 hours.
    Journal article
    Environment and Ecology, 1995, Vol.13, No.1, pp.47-51, 15 ref. | Post-Graduate Department of Zoology, Ayya Nadar Janaki Ammal College, Sivakasi 626124, India. | 0970-0420
    Keywords : beneficial insects; forest trees; pollination; honey bees; agricultural entomology
    Location : | India; Tamil Nadu
    Database : CABI, 19950617406

  • Effect of temperature on food intake, growth and conversion efficiency of Eupterote mollifera (Insecta: Lepidoptera) Pest of Moringa pterygosperma, India .
    Palanichamy, S., Ponnuchamy, R. Thangaraj, T. 1982

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Proceedings. Animal sciences - Indian Academy of Sciences.Sept 1982. v. 91 (5) p. 417-422. ill. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : | India
    Database : AGRICOLA, QL1 I48

  • Studies on seed development and maturation in annual moringa
    Palanisamy, V., Kumaresan, K. Jayabharathi, M. Karivaratharaju, T. V. 1985

    Developing fruits of M. oleifera were collected at 5-day intervals up to 110 days after anthesis. Several fruit and seed characteristics were determined, including seed moisture content, germination and seedling dry weight. The data are tabulated. The optimum date for seed harvesting was 100 days after anthesis, when the highest germination was recorded (98%). A delay in harvest date beyond the 100th day resulted in seed quality deterioration.
    Journal article
    Vegetable Science, 1985, Vol.12, No.2, pp.74-78, 8 ref. | Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore 641 003, India. |
    Keywords : cultural methods; seed production; harvesting date; germination
    Location : | India; Tamil Nadu
    Database : CABI, 19870342643

  • Influence of seed treatments and containers on the viability of annual moringa seeds.
    Palanisamy, V., Balakrishnan, K. Karivaratharaju, T. V. Arumugam, R. 1995

    Moringa oleifera seeds were dried to approx equal to 8% moisture content and treated with captan (75% wettable powder at 2 g/kg seeds, dissolved in water), activated clay (10 g/kg seeds), Bavistin [carbendazim] (2 g/kg seeds, dissolved in water) or cowdung ash (10 g/kg seeds). Controls were untreated. Seeds were then stored in fresh gada cloth bags or 700-gauge thick polyethylene bags (250 g seeds/bag) under ambient conditions. Samples were removed from storage at 2-monthly intervals for germination tests (the last samples were removed after 12 months). Viability decreased progressively as storage duration increased in all treatments but the decrease was least in seeds treated with captan and stored in polyethylene bags, which showed 40% germination after 12 months (the original germination percentage for all treatments before storage was 94%), compared with 4-14% in the other treatments.
    Journal article
    South Indian Horticulture, 1995, Vol.43, No.1/2, pp.42-43, 3 ref. | Horticultural College & Research Institute, Periyakulam 626501, India. | 0038-3473
    Keywords : polyethylene; storage; seed treatment; fungicides; manure; germination
    Location : | India; Tamil Nadu
    Database : CABI, 19960308591

  • Genetic variability in seed moringa.
    Pandian, I. R. S., Sambandamoorthy, S. Irulappan, I. 1992

    Twenty Moringa pterygosperma [M. oleifera ] genotypes were grown during 1986-87 and data recorded for pod length, pod weight, pods/tree and yield/tree in the first, second and ratoon crops. Variability parameters, broad sense heritability and genetic advance were calculated. Variability was high for pod weight and yield in all 3 crops and genotypic and phenotypic variances and coefficients of variation were highest for yield in the ratoon crop. Highest heritability was also seen for yield in the ratoon crop (76.5%). The results indicated that selection for pod weight and yield will lead to improved yielding genotypes.
    Journal article
    Madras Agricultural Journal, 1992, Vol.79, No.1, pp.58-59, 4 ref. | Horticultural Research Station, Periyakulam 625 501, India. | 0024-9602
    Keywords : yield components; genetic variance; heritability; fatty oil plants; oil plants
    Location : | India; Tamil Nadu
    Database : CABI, 19941604882

  • Utilization of some phyto-extracts for control of Sclerotium rolfsii during paddy straw mushroom (Volvariella volvacea ) cultivation - a new approach.
    Pani, B. K., Patra, A. K. 1997

    In vitro and in vivo studies were conducted to determine the effect of extracts of Azadirachta indica , Psidium guajava , Lantana camara , Sopindus trifoliat [Sapindus trifoliatus ], Rauwolfia serpentina [Rauvolfia serpentina ], Lawsonia inermis , Agle marmelos , Cynodon dactylon , Tamarindus indica , Eichhornia crassipes , Adhatoda vasica , Moringa oleifera , Pongamia glabra [P. pinnata] and Tagetes erecta on the mycelial growth of V. volvacea and Sclerotium rolfsii [Corticium rolfsii ]. The leaf extract of Tamarindus indica , followed by the seed extract of Sopindus trifoliat and the root extract of M. oleifera suppressed the growth of Sclerotium rolfsii . Paddy straw inoculated with Sclerotium rolfsii and treated with Tamarindus indica leaf extract resulted in the highest sporophore yield followed by Sopindus trifoliat seed extract and M. oleifera root extract.
    Journal article
    Mushroom Research, 1997, Vol.6, No.1, pp.37-41, 12 ref. | Centre of Tropical Mushroom Research and Training, Department of Plant Pathology, Orissa University of Agriculture & Technology, Bhubaneswar 751003, India. |
    Keywords : plant extracts; inhibition; crop yield; medicinal plants; antifungal plants
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19981008432

  • AM fungi: A biological approach towards conservation of endangered plants in Thar desert, India
    Panwar, Jitendra, Vyas, Anil 2002

    The efficiency of eight arbuscular mycorrhizal species, Acaulospora mellea Spain & Schenck, Gigaspora margarita Becker & Hall, Gigaspora gigantea (Nicol. & Gerd.) Gerd. & Trappe, Glomus deserticola Trappe, Bloss & Menge, Glomus fasciculatum (Thaxter sensu Gerd.) Gerd. & Trappe, Sclerocystis rubiformis Gerd. & Trappe, Scutellospora calospora (Nicol. & Gerd.) Walker & Sanders and Scutellospora nigra (Red head) Walker & Sanders, collected from rhizosphere soils of Moringa concanensis, was evaluated for nutrient uptake and enhancement of acid phosphatase, nitrate reductase, peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase activities in this endangered tree of the Indian Thar desert. Culturing was done under glasshouse conditions and analyses were performed 180 days after inoculation. All fungi showed beneficial effects, with G. margarita being the most efficient in promoting all biochemical parameters.
    Journal article
    Current science : (Bangalore). 2002 , vol. 82 , no 5 , pp. 576 - 5 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : INIST, 533

  • External features of the larva of Holotrichia rufoflava Brenske (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae).
    Patil, S. P., Veeresh, G. K. 1984

    In India, larvae of Holotrichia rufoflava cause serious damage to the roots of citrus and cultivated crops such as groundnut and sorghum (jowar). The authors describe the 3rd-instar larva of H. rufoflava following examination of specimens reared from eggs laid by adults collected from guava and moringa [Moringa oleifera ] at Bangalore, Karnataka.
    Journal article
    Journal of Maharashtra Agricultural Universities, 1984, Vol.9, No.1, pp.58-60, 1 ref. | Department of Entomology, Agricultural College, Dapoli 415712, India. | 0378-2395
    Keywords : distribution; food plants; morphology; agricultural entomology
    Location : | India; Karnataka
    Database : CABI, 19850523385

  • Third stage larva of Holotrichia rustica Burmeister (Melolonthinae: Scarabaeidae: Coleoptera).
    Patil, S. P., Veeresh, G. K. 1985

    A taxonomic description of the 3rd-instar larvae of Holotrichia rustica, a pest of brinjal [aubergine], groundnut and coffee, is given. The larvae were the progeny of adults collected from Moringa sp. in Karnataka, India.
    Journal article
    Journal of Soil Biology & Ecology, 1985, Vol.5, No.2, pp.116-119, 5 ref. | Dep. Entomology, Konkan Krishi Vidyapeeth, Dapoli 415712, Maharashtra, India. | 0970-1370
    Keywords : food plants; taxonomy; vegetables; stimulant plants; agricultural entomology
    Location : | India; Karnataka
    Database : CABI, 19860538111

  • Influence of leaf leachates of plant species on mineral nutrition of Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench.
    Pawar, K. B., Chavan, P. D. 1996

    Experiments were conducted to assess the effects of aqueous leaf extracts of Eucalyptus globulus, Melia azedarach, Parthenium hysterophorus, Moringa oleifera and soyabeans on the mineral uptake by sorghum. Results of analyses of seedlings exposed to extracts for 8 days indicated that uptake of Zn, Ca and Mg were more affected than K, P, Fe or Mn by extract exposure, and all five extracts reduced uptake of these minerals. P. hysterophorus led to the greatest reduction in Zn uptake, E. globulus caused the greatest reduction in Ca absorption, and both of these and M. oleifera caused marked reductions in Mg uptake.
    Journal article
    Allelopathy Journal, 1999, Vol.6, No.1, pp.87-92, 8 ref. | Department of Botany, Shivaji University, Kolhapur 416 004, Maharashtra, India. | 0971-4693
    Keywords : mineral nutrition; nutrient uptake; allelopathy; poisonous plants; mineral uptake; weeds
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19990704260

  • Respiratory rate and vital heat of some specialty vegetables at various storage temperatures.
    Peiris, K. H. S., Mallon, J. L. Kays, S. J. 1997

    Respiratory rate was measured and vital heat calculated for 18 specialty vegetables (Eruca sativa [E. vesicaria subsp. sativa ], banana flower buds, Momordica charantia , cassava, Sechium edule , Allium tuberosum , A. scorodoprasum , Eleocharis dulcis , Moringa oleifera , Cyamopsis tetragonoloba , Lablab purpureus , Jerusalem artichokes, Pachyrhizus erosus , Trigonella foenum-graecum , salsify, Coccinia grandis , Physalis ixocarpa and Curcuma longa ) at 0, 5, 10, and 20 deg C. Respiration rates increased more or less exponentially with increasing storage temperature in all the vegetables tested, CO2 varying from 28 to 302 mgkg-1h-1 at 20 deg for C. longa and M. oleifera , respectively. At 0 deg , the same vegetables had the lowest and highest respiration rates among the species (viz. CO2 at 4.5 and 28 mgkg-1h-1, respectively). Among the vegetables tested, above-ground plant parts such as leaves, fruits and flowers generally had higher respiration rates than subterranean storage organs such as roots, corms and tubers. Vital heat produced ranged from 49 Jkg-1h-1 for C. longa at 0 deg to 3272 Jkg-1h-1 for M. oleifera at 20 deg .
    Journal article
    HortTechnology, 1997, Vol.7, No.1, pp.46-49, 22 ref. | Department of Horticulture, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-7273, USA. |
    Keywords : flowers; buds; culinary herbs; storage
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19970303599

  • Agroforesterie: une technologie agricole r?g?n?ratrice plein de promesses Agroforestry: a potential sustainable agricultural technology
    Peterson, R., Badji, M. Seck, V.G. 1989

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Serie: Entre nous 1989. - n. 7, p. 1-8 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : SESAME, 11882 (ICRAF - KENYA)

  • Les sols du Moyen et Bas Logone, du Bas Chari, des r?gions riveraines du lac Tchad et du Bahr El Ghazal
    Pias, Jean, 1962

    (No abstract)
    Report
    ORSTOM, Paris (FRA), 1962, XII-439 p., ill. - (M?moires ORSTOM (FRA), No 2) | |
    Keywords : soils; pedogenesis; hydrological balance; climatology
    Location : | Extreme North Cameroon; Logone and Chari; Tchad
    Database : Horizon, F A12865/2; B CB2/2; M CM 10/1; M A12865/1; P TCH 62.14/1; C HC10-102 PIA/1; MH 60237/1

  • Helopeltis antonii Sign. as a pest of Moringa Oleifera.
    Pillai, K.S., Saradamma, K. Nair, M.R.G.K. 1980

    Helopeltis antonii Sign., which is known to infest tea, cashew, guava and grapevine, is recorded for the first time on the tree Moringa oleifera [a source of oil] in the Trivandrum and Quilon districts of Kerala State, India. Feeding, reproduction and development were all observed on M. oleifera, and caused withering and die-back of terminal shoots, fall of individual flowers and drying of the whole inflorescence, and white patches and incomplete development in fruits; sometimes after heavy infestation the whole tree appeared dead, with no leaves or flowers.
    Journal article
    Current Science, 1980, Vol.49, No.7, pp.288-289, 2 ref. | College of Agriculture, Vellayani, Kerala, India. | 0011-3891
    Keywords : damage; agricultural entomology
    Location : | India
    Database : AGRICOLA, 475 SCI23 CABI, 19800577115

  • Plasticulture in betelvine cultivation.
    Pitam Chandra, 1990

    The three methods of growing P. betel [P. betle ] in India are (1) in a mixed plantation with crops such as arecanut, jackfruit, mango and coconut, where no further shade is required, (2) together with fast-growing plants such as Sesbania grandiflora, Erythrina variegata or Moringa oleifera, or (3) under artificial shades, known as Bareja or Boroj. The climatic requirements, methods of training, and irrigation requirements of the crop are briefly described. It is suggested that it would benefit from being grown under plastic greenhouses.
    Conference paper
    Proceedings of the 11th international congress on the use of plastics in agriculture, New Delhi, India, 26th February-2nd March 1990., 1990, pp.F.99-F.106, 7 ref. A. A. Balkema, Rotterdam, Netherlands | Division of Agricultural Engineering, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi 110012, India. | 90-6191-998-3
    Keywords : Irrigation; Shade plants; cultivation; Greenhouses; Broadleaves; Intercropping;
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19920311627

  • Two species of Longidorus from Marathwada region.
    Prabha, M. J., 1973

    Longidorus indicus n.sp. is described on 3 females from soil around the roots of drum stick (Moringa pterigosperma) from Aurangabad, Maharashtra, India. They are 3.84 to 4.34 mm long and have bilobed amphids with pore-like openings, a smoothly rounded lip region, an odontostyle 91 to 98 mu long, an odontophore 46 to 51.5 mu long, the stylet guiding ring 32 to 35 mu or 3 times the lip region width from the anterior end, a dorsally convex-conoid tail 42 to 59 mu or almost one anal body-width long and the vulva at 38 to 49 percent of the body length from the anterior end. It is close to L. sylphus and L. africanus, differing in the characters of the lip region, the position of the guiding ring and the tail length. Longidorus siddiqii, found in soil around the roots of arum (Colocasia esculenta) from the same locality, is also described.the anterior end. It.
    Journal article
    Nematologica, 1973, Vol.19, No.1, pp.62-68 | Dept. of Zoology, Marathwada Univ., Aurangabad, India. | 0028-2596
    Keywords : new species; morphology; regions; nematology
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19730806069

  • Plant extracts for the management of moringa fruit fly Gitona distigma
    Raghumoorthi, K.N., Subha Rao, P.V. 1999

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Bio pesticides in insect pest management pp 101-106 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Studies on the host preference of the woolly bear, Pericallia ricini F.
    Raghunath, T. A. V. S., Reddy, A. S. Rao, B. H. K. 1981

    In laboratory studies on the suitability of 8 larval food-plants for the polyphagous pest Pericallia ricini (F.), the duration of development (in days) at an average of 27.2 deg C averaged 36.0 on castor, 45.0 on Bougainvillea sp., 39.2 on sesame, 39.0 on cotton, 46.0 on Moringa oleifera and 37.0 on Coccinia indica. No development took place on the other 2 plants. No larval mortality occurred on the 4 best food-plants, but on Bougainvillea and Moringa there was 10-15% mortality and some pupae and adults were malformed.
    Journal article
    Current Research, 1981, Vol.10, No.7, pp.124-125, 2 ref. | Division of Entomology, AP Agricultural University, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad-500 030, India. |
    Keywords : food plants; development; pests; oilseed plants; agricultural entomology
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19820598432

  • Control of moringa fruitfly Gitona sp., and leaf caterpillar Noorda blitealis with insecticides and botanicals.
    Ragumoorthi, K. N., Arumugam, R. 1991

    Five chemical insecticides and 3 plant extracts were tested against 2 pests on Moringa oleifera grown as a vegetable crop in Tamil Nadu, India, in 1988-89. All treatments against Gitona sp. (in which the pesticides were applied in sprays at 3 litres/tree during 50% fruit set) caused significant reductions in the percentage of fruits infested and the mean number of larvae per fruit, as compared with the untreated control. Treatment against Noorda blitealis took place during the early vegetative stage and flowering, and all treatments caused significant reductions in larval populations up to 21 days after treatment, as compared with the control. The best results against the 2 pests were obtained with 0.04% dichlorvos and fenthion and 1% neem cake extract and neem oil.
    Journal article
    Indian Journal of Plant Protection, 1992, Vol.20, No.1, pp.61-65, 4 ref. | College of Horticulture, Tamil Nadu G.D. Naidu Agricultural University, Periyakulam-626 501, India. | 0253-4355
    Keywords : fatty oil plants; insecticides; insect pests; neem extracts; chemical control; agricultural entomolo
    Location : | India; Tamil Nadu
    Database : CABI, 19921177107

  • Neem products and plant extracts for managing Moringa fruit fly, Gitona distigma (Meigon).
    Ragumoorthi, K. N., Rao, P. V. S. Dhaliwal, G. S. Arora, R. Randhawa, N. S. Dhawan, A. K. 1998

    Five neem [Azadirachta indica ] formulations: Nimbecidine 0.03%, Neem Azal 1%, Neem Gold 0.15%, Econeem 0.3% and Rakshak 0.15% were evaluated against G. distigma . Effectiveness of these formulations was measured in terms of ovicidal action, adult emergence, fecundity, hatchability, maggot survival and behavioural response. Among the neem formulations, Nimbecidine was effective with high antioviposition effect (15.33 eggs/female at 150 ppm concentration and 54.67 eggs/female in control), reduced longevity of adult (11 days at 150 ppm and 23.33 days in control), reduced adult emergence (71.25% treatment, 85.50% in control), reduced fecundity (50.25 eggs/female against 62.75 eggs/female in control), reduced hatchability (57.25% against 69.75% in control) and reduced maggot survival (81.25% against 89.0% in control). Even after 7 days, only 22.6% of adult flies orientated on the Nimbecidine treated fruits and there was no orientation of adult flies till the end of two days after treatment. Aqueous and methanolic plant extracts from leaves of Vitex negundo , shoot of Tribulus terrestris , shoot of Catharanthus roseus , seeds of Melia azedarach , leaves of Azadirachta indica , seed kernel of A. indica (NSKE), leaves of Tagetes erecta , and leaves of Prosopis juliflora were assessed for their reaction to G. distigma . Among them, methanolic plant extracts of V. negundo , M. azedarach and NSKE were more effective with high feeding deterrency (43.75-62.50%), low fecundity (51.90-74.26% reduction), low hatchability (46.75-51.25%), high maggot mortality (18.50-24.75%), high puparium mortality (24.75-31.25%) and high adult malformation (7.75-18.25%). Nimbecidine 0.03% at 150 ppm as foliar spray during 50% fruit set and soil application of NSKE at 2 litres per tree incorporated in the IPM programme for G. distigma has yielded higher numbers of moringa (Moringa pterygosperma ) fruits.
    Conference paper
    Ecological agriculture and sustainable development: Volume 2. Proceedings of International Conference on Ecological Agriculture: Towards Sustainable Development, Chandigarh, India, 15-17 November, 1997., 1998, pp.250-261, 27 ref. Centre for Research in R | Department of Entomology, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore-641 003, India. | 81-85835-39-X
    Keywords : plant extracts; integrated pest management; chemical control; neem extracts; agricultural entomology
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19991102024

  • Assessment of economic injury level (EIL) for moringa fruitfly Gitona distigma (Meigon) (Diptera: Drosophilidae).
    Ragumoorthy, K. N., Selvaraj, K. N. Rao, P. V. S. Reddy, P. P. (ed) Kumar, N. K. K. (ed) Verghese, A. (ed) 1998

    In a field study in Tamil Nadu, pest damage by Gitona distigma on Moringa oleifera was assessed by fitting linear, log linear and quadratic equations for eggs, maggots per fruit, per cent affected fruits and yield. Log linear equation was the most precise for eliciting the threshold for economic injury level (EIL). In untreated crops, EIL was either 11.9 eggs/fruit or 11.7 larvae/fruit or 15.1% of fruits affected. Where insecticides were used, EIL was 7.5 eggs/fruit, 7.4 larvae/fruit or 9.5% affected fruits.
    Conference paper
    Advances in IPM for horticultural crops. Proceedings of the First National Symposium on Pest Management in Horticultural Crops: environmental implications and thrusts, Bangalore, India, 15-17 October 1997., 1998, pp.137-139, 7 ref. Association for Advanc | Department of Agricultural Entomology, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore - 641 003, India. |
    Keywords : insecticides; insect pests; agricultural entomology
    Location : | Tamil Nadu; India
    Database : CABI, 19991105508

  • IPM for moringa fruitfly Gitona distigma (Meigon) (Diptera: Drosophilidae).
    Ragumoorthy, K. N., Rao, P. V. S. Reddy, P. P. (ed) Kumar, N. K. K. (ed) Verghese, A. (ed) 1998

    A field study in 1993/94 in Tamil Nadu with Moringa oleifera indicated that Gitona distigma can be managed by adopting IPM measures. This includes applications of fenthion 80 EC 0.04% during the vegetative and flowering stages, application of 150 ppm 0.03% Nimbecidine during 50% fruit set and 35 days later, soil application of neem [Azadirachta indica ] seed kernel extract 2 litres/tree at 50% fruit set and weekly removal of affected fruits.
    Conference paper
    Advances in IPM for horticultural crops. Proceedings of the First National Symposium on Pest Management in Horticultural Crops: environmental implications and thrusts, Bangalore, India, 15-17 October 1997., 1998, pp.140-144, 5 ref. Association for Advanc | Department of Agricultural Entomology, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore - 641 003, India. |
    Keywords : fruits; integrated pest management; chemical control; neem extracts; agricultural entomology
    Location : | India; Tamil Nadu
    Database : CABI, 19991105509

  • A comparative investigation on the physio-chemical properties and some selected enzymes content in the flesh of healthy and Rhizopus stolonifer infected moringa fruit
    Rahman, M. Z., Saud, Z. A. Absar, N. 2001

    The physio-chemical composition of healthy and R. stolonifer -infected moringa (Moringa oleifera cultivars Najna and Sajina) fruits were investigated at different maturity levels (immature, mature and ripe). Of the cultivars examined, Najna contained the highest amount of protein, total sugar, reducing sugar, total soluble solid (TSS), starch and ash, while Sajina contained the highest values for total titrable acidity (TTA), moisture, lipid, vitamin C [ascorbic acid]. In both the healthy and infected conditions, total sugar, reducing sugar, sucrose, TSS, moisture, protein and lipid content were increased but ash, TTA and vitamin C content decreased moderately with the changes in maturity. Starch content changed very rapidly after mature stage. All the nutrient contents under investigation except protein, reducing sugar and ash decreased after infection of moringa fruits with R. stolonifer . The activities of all the seven enzymes under investigation increased after infection of moringa fruits. The activities of catalase and protease [proteinase] increased but that of polyphenol oxidase [catechol oxidase] and ascorbic acid oxidase decreased remarkably with the advancement of maturity stages. The activities of amylase, cellulase and invertase [-fructofuranosidase] increased up to mature stage and then decreased abruptly.
    Journal article
    Indian Phytopathology, 2001, vol. 54, no. 3, pp. 293-298 Indian Phytopathological Society, New Delhi, India | Department of Biochemistry, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi 6205, Bangladesh. | 0367-973X
    Keywords : chemical composition; cultivars; enzymes; lipid absorption; postharvest decay; storage decay
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 20023011319 Ingenta, Uncover plus

  • Effect of food utilization on the larvae of Eupterote mollifera fed with cythion sprayed Moringa indica leaves.
    Raj, T. P., Selvanayagam, M. Thatheyus, A. J. Jebanesan, A. 1994

    When leaves of the food plant Moringa indica were sprayed with 5, 25 or 50 mg/litre cythion [malathion], food consumption and assimilation in 2nd-instar larvae of Eupterote mollifera increased but there was a rapid decline in older larvae.
    Journal article
    Environment and Ecology, 1994, Vol.12, No.1, pp.199-201, 7 ref. | Department of Zoology, Loyola College, Madras 600034, India. | 0970-0420
    Keywords : insect pests; pesticides; feeding; agricultural entomology
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19951102908

  • Apiculture and farm forestry in semi-arid tracts of Karnataka.
    Rajan, B. K. C., 1986

    A discussion of the need for growing trees on farms with special reference to the decline in the proportion of the total area covered by forest in 19 districts over the 5 yr until 1977-78. Multiple-use trees are recommended, particularly those which could also support honeybees during periods of the year when they are unable to depend on agricultural crops; 15 species are suggested. Selection criteria, nursery practice, planting methods and aftercare are outlined. The advantages of planting Eucalyptus hybrid [E. tereticornis], Leucaena leucocephala and Moringa oleifera are discussed. A further list is given of possible farm trees (42 species) including those mentioned above.
    Journal article
    Myforest, 1986, Vol.22, No.1, 41-49 + 1 pl., 3 ref. | Dept. Farm For., Univ. Agric. Sci., Bangalore 560 065, India. |
    Keywords : honey bees; Farm woodlands
    Location : | India; Karnataka
    Database : CABI, 19870615350

  • Energy plantations in the waste lands through social forestry programmes (a case study).
    Ramulu, C. A., Digamber Rao Trivedi, R.N.; Sarma, P.K.S.; Singh, M.P. (ed) 1991

    An outline of social forestry programmes undertaken in Andhra Pradesh by the Social Forestry Division at Warangal, with the aim of establishing fuel plantations. The programmes include: beneficiary (scheduled castes/tribes and underprivileged communities) orientated nurseries and strip plantations; social security plantations; leasing of forest lands through government schemes; cooperative plantations by village forestry associations on village common lands or waste lands; and the establishment of school nurseries. The species chosen included Acacia nilotica, Casuarina equisetifolia, Dalbergia sissoo, Dendrocalamus strictus, Prosopis juliflora, Emblica officinalis [Phyllanthus emblica], Moringa oleifera and Tectona grandis.
    Conference paper
    Environmental assessment and management. Social forestry in tribal regions (Proceedings of IIIrd Conference, Mendelian Society of India) held at Birsa Agriculture University, Ranchi, 4-7 April, 1989., 1991, pp.441-444 Today & Tomorrow's Printers & Publis | Department of Botany, Kakatiya University, Warangal 506 009, India. | 81-7019-380-X
    Keywords : Broadleaves; Social forestry; Fuel plantations; sociology
    Location : | India; Andhra Pradesh
    Database : CABI, 19920657610

  • Some post-harvest diseases of fruits and vegetables from Maharashtra.
    Rao, V. G., 1987

    Among the diseases recorded from 13 host plants, those new to Maharashtra include Aspergillus niger causing dry rot of arecanut, A. fumigatus and A. terreus (dry rot of coconut), Colletotrichum dematium (blossom end rot) and Phoma cucurbitacearum (soft rot) on cucumber, P. cucurbitacearum and Botryodiplodia theobromae on bitter gourd (Momordica charantia ) fruits, B. theobromae on pods of Moringa oleifera, Memnoniella echinata causing skin spot of banana, Geotrichum candidum waxy rot of Phyllanthus emblica fruits, and A. niger on aubergine.
    Journal article
    Biovigyanam, 1986, Vol.12, No.1, pp.14-16, 6 ref. | Dep. Mycol. Plant Path., M.A.C.S. Res. Inst., Pune 411 004, India. | 0250-507X
    Keywords : postharvest decay; biodeterioration; oilseed plants; fruit crops; plant pathology
    Location : | India; Maharashtra
    Database : CABI, 19871335526

  • A comparative efficacy of fungicides and plant extracts on radial growth and biomass production of Alternaria alternata .
    Rashmi, Yadav, B. P. 1999

    Six fungicides (Indofil M-45 [mancozeb], Captaf 75% WP [captan], Blitox-50 [copper oxychloride], Bavistin 50 WP [carbendazim], Ridomil MZ-72 WP [metalaxyl + mancozeb] and Kavach 75% WP [chlorothalonil]) and four plant extracts (Ocimum basilicum , Moringa pterigosperma [M. oleifera ], Achyranthes aspera and Allium sativum ) were assayed for fungitoxicity against Alternaria alternata , causal agent of leaf spot and blight disease in brinjal [aubergine] (Solanum melongena ), in vitro . Bavistin at 0.15% was the most effective fungicide in reducing the radial growth and biomass of the fungus. Bulb extract of Allium sativum and leaf extract of Ocimum basilicum at 2.0% were the most effective plant products in suppressing radial growth and biomass production. Leaf extract of Achyranthus aspera and Moringa pterigosperma were almost ineffective.
    Journal article
    Journal of Applied Biology, 1999, Vol.9, No.1, pp.73-76, 6 ref. | Department of Plant Pathology, Rajendra Agricultural University, Pusa, Samastipur-848 125, Bihar, India. |
    Keywords : plant pathogens; fungi; fungicides; control
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 20001007044

  • Immunocytochemical evidence that secretion of pectin occurs during gel (gum) and tylosis formation in trees
    Rioux, D., Nicole, Michel Simard, M. Ouellette, G.B. 1998

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Phytopathology (USA), 1998, Vol. 88, No 6, p. 494-505, bibl., ill., phot. | |
    Keywords : pectine; vegetal physiology; histology; cytology; microscopy
    Location : |
    Database : Horizon, F B010015247/2; M PM 360/1; M B010056026/1

  • Chemical Composition of Fruits and Leaves Eaten by Short-Nosed Fruit Bat, Cynopterus sphinx
    Ruby J., Nathan P.T. Balasingh J. Kunz T.H. 2000

    We evaluated organic and macromineral composition of selected fruits and leaves consumed by the short-nosed fruit bat, Cynopterus sphinx in South India. Results of principal components analysis (PCA) comparing soluble carbohydrates, crude protein, and crude fats indicate a higher percentage of protein in leaves and a higher percentage of carbohydrates and lipids in fruits. However, results of a paired t test comparing these organic components indicated no differences between fruits and leaves. Among the fruits analyzed, Musa x paradisiaca had the highest percentage of carbohydrates, and Psidium guajava had the highest percentage of lipids. Leaves of Cassia fistula, Moringa oleifera, coccinia cordifolia, and F. religiosa had the highest percentage of protein. PCA of selected macrominerals (Ca, Na, K, and P) indicate higher levels of Ca in leaves than in fruits. Results of t tests comparing these macrominerals revealed a difference between fruits and leaves for Ca, but not for the other macrominerals. Among the leaves analyzed, Ca was highest in mature leaves of C. fistula and lowest in leaves of F. religiosa. Leaves of M. oleifera and fruits of Achras sapota were highest in sodium. Among fruits analyzed for macrominerals, Ca was highest in F. bengalensis and lowest in Prosopis juliflora, A. sapota, and M. x paradisiaca. Potassium levels were highest in leaves of C. cordifolia and fruit pods of Prosopis juliflora. Phosphorus content was highest in leaves of M. oleifera and fruits of M. x paradisiaca. The relatively high concentrations of protein and calcium in leaves eaten by C. sphinx supports the hypothesis that leaves are important dietary sources for this plant-visiting bat.
    Journal article
    Journal of Chemical Ecology, December 2000, vol. 26, no. 12, pp. 2825-2841(17) Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, New York, U.S.A. | [1]Department of Zoology, St. John's College, Palayamkottai, 627 002, South India [2]Department of Biology, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 kunz@bu.edu | 0098-0331
    Keywords : Bats; calcium; folivory; frugivory; nutrition; protein;
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 20013021432 Ingenta, Online articles, SICI (online): 0098-0331261228252841 INIST, 17087

  • Determination of thermal process schedules for canned drumstick, okra, elephant yam and potato.
    Saikia, L., Ranganna, S. 1992

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Journal of Food Science and Technology 29(4): 203-209. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Variability studies in annual moringa
    Sathashakthi, A., 1999

    (No abstract)
    Thesis
    Ph.D. Thesis, TNAU, India | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Lutte contre les nuisibles : la m?thode naturelle. Une introduction ? la protection des v?g?taux excluant les pecticides de synth?se
    Schwab, A., 1988

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Nature et Progr?s, 1988. - 83 p. - inter.: T | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : SESAME, FT915065 (CIRAD - FRANCE)

  • A study of practices and problems in the cultivation of some perenial vegetables in Madras State
    Seemanthani, B., 1964

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    South Indian Horticulture, Vol 12.1-7 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Comparative biology of cashew stem and root borer, Plocaederus ferrugineus L. on natural host and semi-synthetic diet.
    Senguttuvan, T., Mahadevan, N. R. 1998

    Biological studies on P. ferrugineus revealed that adults mated a day after emergence, and mating occurred 3 to 6 times a day mostly during night. The mean pre-oviposition and oviposition periods were 3.6 and 7.2 days, respectively. A female beetle laid an average of 62 eggs and the incubation period was 6.9 days. In cashew root logs, the grub period, pupal period and total life cycle were 163.9, 60.3 and 249.6 days for male and 168, 70 and 261 days for female, respectively. On a semi-synthetic diet, the grub period, pupal period and total life cycle were 219.7, 53.3 and 284.3 days for male and 212.3, 63.3 and 291.5 days for female, respectively. About 6 to 7 instars were noticed in both male and female. There was an increase in total life cycle by one month when reared on a semi-synthetic diet. The grubs did not form calcareous cocoons on a semi-synthetic diet. The adult beetles developed from moringa and cashew logs were larger in size, lived longer and laid more eggs than those on a semi-synthetic diet.
    Journal article
    Journal of Plantation Crops, 1998, Vol.26, No.2, pp.133-138, 14 ref. | National Pulses Research Centre (TNAU), Vamban-622 303, Pudukkottai, Tamil Nadu, India. | 0304-5242
    Keywords : insect pests; agricultural entomology
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19991108083

  • Behavioural control of the cashew stem and root borer, Plocaederus ferrugineus L.
    Senguttuvan, T., Mahadevan, N. R. 1999

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Pest Management in Horticultural Ecosystems, 1999, Vol.5, No.1, pp.72-73, 6 ref. | National Pulses Research Centre, Vamban 622 303, Pudukkotai, Tamil Nadu, India. |
    Keywords : insect pests; plant pests; insect control; agricultural entomology
    Location : | Tamil Nadu; India
    Database : CABI, 19991108688

  • Plant feeding by Eocanthecona furcellata (Wolff.) (Heteroptera: Asopinae): effect on development, survival and reproduction.
    Senrayan, R., 1991

    Individuals of Eocanthecona furcellata [Cantheconidea furcellata ] were collected from Mangifera indica [mangoes] and Moringa oleifera in Madras, India, in 1986-89. The adults and larvae were provided with some combination of diet (larvae of L. lepida [lepidopteran genus is not specified, possibly Latoia, preferred name is Parasa lepida ], water and leaves of M. indica ) in the laboratory. Larvae provided with only leaves and water died in their 2nd or 3rd instar. Larvae reared with prey and leaves survived in 92% of cases. Larvae reared with prey and water survived in 88% of cases. Larvae reared with prey alone survived in 82% of cases. The length of time taken for development from the 3rd to the 5th instar was reduced if a diet of prey was supplemented with leaves, and the larvae and adult females were larger in these cases. The implications of the polyphagous nature of C. furcellata on its use as a biological control agent are mentioned. The predator population may be sustained in periods of low prey density by feeding on vegetation, but there is the possibility that it may be a vector of plant disease.
    Journal article
    Phytophaga (Madras), 1991, Vol.3, No.2, pp.103-108, 15 ref. | Entomology Research Institute, Loyola College, Madras 600034, India. |
    Keywords : Insect pests; Fatty oil plants; Biological control; Transmission; agricultural entomology
    Location : | Tamil Nadu; India
    Database : CABI, 19931168481

  • Insect pest problems in social forestry plantations and their management.
    Sen-Sarma, P. K., 1988

    An account of the various pests that damage social forestry tree species in stored seeds, nurseries and forest plantations in India. The term 'social' forestry is taken to include community forestry and agroforestry, and the species covered are multipurpose, the most common genera being Acacia, Albizia, Artocarpus, Azadirachta, Casuarina, Celtis, Emblica (E. officinalis [Phyllanthus emblica ]), Eucalyptus, Madhuca, Mangifera, Moringa, Pongamia, Prosopis, Sesbania, Syzygium, Tamarindus and Zizyphus [Ziziphus ], although others are also included in the account. The plantation pests section includes defoliators, sap suckers and wood borers and is written mainly with reference to the monocultures used in 'pure' social forestry plantations. The various management techniques (cultural methods, chemical and biological control agents) used to prevent and control insect infestation are discussed.
    Journal article
    Indian Journal of Forestry, 1987, Vol.10, No.4, pp.239-244, 24 ref. | Director Biol. Res., For. Res. Inst., Dehra Dun, UP 248006, India. | 0250-524X
    Keywords : Agroforestry; insect pests; ecology; community forestry; Biological control; agricultural entomology
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19880625113

  • Effect of feeding tender and senescent leaf by Eupterote mollifera and tender leaf and flower by Spodoptera exigua on food utilization.
    Senthamizhselvan, M., Muthukrishnan, J. 1989

    Food utilization of by larvae of Spodoptera litura and Eupterote mollifera was studied on tender leaves and flowers of Brassica oleracea and tender and senescent leaves of Moringa oleifera, resp. The food consumption and utilization efficiencies of E. mollifera were higher on tender than on senescent leaves, while larvae of S. litura feeding on flowers had higher values than those on tender leaves. It is concluded that the food utilization parameters of these insects depend on the nutritional quality of the food.
    Journal article
    Proceedings : Animal sciences - Indian Academy of Sciences. Mar 1989. v. 98 (2) p. 77-84. | School of Biological Sciences, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021, India. | 0370-0097
    Keywords : lepidoptera; larvae; nutritional value; insect pests
    Location : |
    Database : AGRICOLA, QL1 I48 CABI, 19911154278

  • Root CEC of tree species used in agroforestry.
    Shadangi, D. K., Totey, N. G. 1997

    Measurements were made of root CEC (cation exchange capacity) in 6-12 month old seedlings of 7 multipurpose tree species. Ranking was in the order Sesbania grandiflora, S. sesban, Acacia nilotica, Dalbergia sissoo, Moringa oleifera, Eucalyptus hybrid [E. tereticornis ], Populus deltoides .
    Journal article
    Vaniki Sandesh, 1997, Vol.21, No.1, pp.4-6, 12 ref. | Tropical Forest Research Institute P.O. - R.F.R.C., Mandla Road, Jabalpur - 482 021, MP, India. |
    Keywords : roots; cation exchange capacity; seedlings; agroforestry; forest trees
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19980613088

  • Pathogenic fungus of Noorda blitealis Walker. (Lepidoptera-Pyralidae) a major pest of Moringa oleifera Tanss.
    Shamila Kalia, Harsh, N. S. K. Joshi, K. C. 1996

    Two fungi viz. Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus niger , were isolated and identified from the larvae of Noorda blitealis , a major pest of saplings of Moringa oleifera in forest nurseries in Madhya Pradesh. In laboratory tests Noorda blitealis larvae were highly susceptible to spraying with a spore suspension of Aspergillus flavus (70-80% larval mortality resulted) while the larvae proved to be highly resistant to treatment with A. niger spores (no mortality). The A. flavus mortality is thought to be caused by invasion of the host through respiratory orifices, wounds and by ingestion, which results in damage through mycotoxin production, histolysis, physical damage and blockage of the alimentary canal from mycelial growth.
    Journal article
    Indian Journal of Forestry, 1996, Vol.19, No.1, pp.94-96, 14 ref. | Forest Entomology Division, T.F.R.I., Jabalpur [M.P.] - 482 021, India. | 0250-524X
    Keywords : forest trees; plant pests; pest control; forest nurseries; fungi; agricultural entomology
    Location : | India; Madhya Pradesh
    Database : CABI, 19970602248

  • Efficacy of foliar spraying of three varietal strains of Bacillus thuringiensis against the Moringa defoliator Noorda blitealis Tanss. (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).
    Shamila Kalia, Joshi, K. C. 1997

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Indian Journal of Plant Protection, 1997, Vol.25, No.1, pp.65-66, 12 ref. | Forest Entomology Division, T.F.R.I., P.O.R.F.R.C., Jabalpur (M.P.) - 482021, India. | 0253-4355
    Keywords : insect pests; plant pests; microbial pesticides; entomopathogenic bacteria; biological control
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19981110928

  • Propagation techniques of Moringa oleifera Lam.. Enriched title: Propagation techniques of Moringa oleifera Lam. [fodder trees, India]
    Sharma, G.K., Raina, V. 1980

    (No abstract)
    Conference paper
    Improvement of forest biomass : symposium proceedings / edited by P.K. Khosla. (ABBREV TITLE = Improv For Biomass) p. 175-181. Proceedings of a symposium; November, 1980 20-21; Solan, India. Solan, India: Indian Society of Tree Scientists: 175-81 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : | India
    Database : AGRICOLA, SD536.6 I4N38 1980

  • Social forestry and rural economy.
    Sharma, S. C., 1989

    A discussion of land resource allocation to social forestry programmes, with reference to the situation in Uttar Pradesh. Topics covered include the socioeconomic structure of the local community, the need for zero-cost fuelwood (cow dung is presently meeting the fuel requirement) and increased fodder resources, and the development of cottage and small-scale industries (such as oil production from plantations of oilseed bearing species including Pongamia pinnata, Azadirachta indica, Moringa oleifera and Madhuca latifolia [M. longifolia] ). The 2 main limitations to social forestry programmes are their encroachment on pasture and grazing lands (leading to fodder shortages) and their economic success, which can lead to the practice of forestry at the expense of food production from agriculture. The main requirements for the success of social forestry programmes are local participation, gearing to local needs, and soil conservation and afforestation in village ponds ('nallas').
    Journal article
    Journal of Tropical Forestry, 1989, Vol.5, No.1, pp.12-16, 8 ref. | K.A. Postgraduate College, Kasganj, UP, India. | 0970-1494
    Keywords : Social forestry; rural economy
    Location : | India; Uttar Pradesh
    Database : CABI, 19930664156

  • House sparrow as predator of white grub adults.
    Sharma, S. K., Bhagirath Singh 1976

    In July 1976 during a survey of the trees on which white-grub (melolonthid) adults feed, elytra of these beetles were found under the oil-producing trees Azadirachta indica (neem) and Moringa oleifera (sanjna) near Jaipur in the Indian State of Rajasthan, and subsequently house sparrows (Passer domesticus) were seen preying on the adults. This predation of hard-bodied insects was confirmed by bringing some of these sparrows into the laboratory and offering them adults of Holotrichia consanguinea (Blanch.) (Lachnosterna consanguinea), which they rapidly consumed except for the elytra.
    Journal article
    Entomologists' Newsletter, 1976, Vol.6, No.6/7, p.42, 1 ref. | State Entomological Laboratory, Durgapura Farm, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India. |
    Keywords : predators; natural enemies; oil plants; agricultural entomology; prey
    Location : | Rajasthan; India
    Database : CABI, 19770543419

  • Fungicidal properties of some plants against Pythium aphanidermatum (Edson) Fitzp.
    Shekhar, R., Dwivedi, A. K. Sharma, S. C. 1996

    Aqueous extracts of leaves of different plants were tested against P . aphanidermatum . The fungus was isolated from seedlings of Amaranthus tricolor cv. Amarchitra displaying damping-off symptoms. Out of 50 plants tested, extracts from Adenocalymna alliaceum , garlic, Bougainvillea glabra , Carum capticum , Citrus medica , Lantana indica and Moringa oleifera completely inhibited the growth of the pathogen.
    Journal article
    Archives of Phytopathology and Plant Protection, 1996, Vol.30, No.4, pp.313-316, 7 ref. | National Botanical Research Institute, Lucknow 226 001, India. | 0323-5408
    Keywords : plant pathogens; fungi; chemical control; plant extracts
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19971001691

  • Homboy Agroforestry Project. A community-based integrated fodder production project for Homboy, Jilib District, Middle Jubba Region, Somalia.
    Somalia, World Concern, Somalia Project Office, 1987

    The proposal and workplan for 1988-91 are presented for this World Concern project to be carried out in agreement with the Somali National Range Agency. The general characteristics, ecology and land use systems of the Homboy area are briefly described. The proposed agroforestry techniques for fodder production for supplementary feeding of herds in the critical dry season months are planting of tree legumes (as farm shelterbelts or in alley cropping systems) and increasing crop diversity by introducing pigeon pea and Moringa spp. (which have edible leaves).
    Report
    Homboy Agroforestry Project. A community-based integrated fodder production project for Homboy, Jilib District, Middle Jubba Region, Somalia., 1987, ii + 5 + 2 + ii pp. World Concern, Somalia Project Office, Mogadishu, Somalia | c/o Box 2925-UNHCR, Mogadishu, Somalia. |
    Keywords : Agroforestry; development projects; Shelterbelts; pigeon peas
    Location : | Somalia
    Database : CABI, 19900639529

  • Effect of leaf extracts on the mortality of Meloidogyne incognita .
    Sosamma, V. K., Jayasree, D. Koshy, P. K. Mehta, U. K. (ed) 1998

    Studies were conducted to evaluate the nematicidal properties of water extracts obtained from some commonly available plant leaves against 2nd stage juveniles of Meloidogyne incognita . Of the sixteen plants tested, 100% mortality was observed with Moringa pterygosperma [Moringa oleifera ] and Momordica charantia at 1:5 dilution after 24 hours whereas with Leucas aspera 100% mortality was observed only after 48 hours. Hundred per cent mortality of juveniles was observed with M. oleifera after 72 hours at the 1:10 dilution.
    Conference paper
    Nematology: challenges and opportunities in 21st Century. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium of Afro-Asian Society of Nematologists (TISAASN), Sugarcane Breeding Institute (ICAR), Coimbatore, India, April 16-19, 1998., 1998, pp.222-225, 8 re | Nematology Laboratory, Central Plantation Crops Research Institute, Regional Station, Kayangulum, Krishnapuram P.O. 690 533, Kerala, India. |
    Keywords : plant extracts; nematicidal properties; chemical control
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 20001701184

  • Impact of fluoride accumulation in plants in an industrial area.
    Stanley, V. A., Shaleesha, A. Pillai, K. S. 1998

    A study was conducted to analyse the impact of environmental fluoride deposition on plants (Terminalia catapa [Terminalia catappa ], Pongamia glabra [P. pinnata ], Thespesia populnea , Moringa oleifera , Cassia alata and Panicum sativum ) in a contaminated industrial area near Madras, India. Deposition of particulate fluoride in all the plants studied during 1994-96 was more than post-monsoon plant samples. Similarly, except in Terminalia catap a, tissue fluoride levels were found to be more in all plants in summer than in post-monsoon samples. It is suggested that an increase in accumulation of fluoride in T. catappa may be due to its larger leaf area compared with conifers.
    Journal article
    Journal of Ecotoxicology & Environmental Monitoring, 1998, Vol.8, No.3/4, pp.275-278, 21 ref. | M S Swaminathan Research Foundation, III Cross Street, Taramani, Chennai 600 113, Tamil Nadu, India. |
    Keywords : contamination; plant tissues; air pollution; forest trees; foliage
    Location : | India; Tamil Nadu
    Database : CABI, 19990606945

  • Drumstick: a MPTS, responses to chemicals in nursery.
    Sudhir Kumar, Singh, R. C. Sunil Kumar 2000

    Drumstick (Moringa oleifera ) is a fast-growing multipurpose tree species (MPTS) which is widely distributed in tropical and subtropical India. This note reports the effect of various chemical seed treatments on seed germination under nursery conditions at the IGFRI Central Research Farm at Jhansi in Uttar Pradesh, in July 1997. Seeds were collected from the Jhansi region, and were of 2 types - white or black. They were tested either with the seedcoat, or with the seedcoat removed. Seeds were given 5 treatments: control, GA3 at 2000 ppm, 0.1% KNO3, 0.1% thiourea, and prechilling (moistened seeds kept at 5-6 deg for 7 days before sowing). [No information is given on sowing/growing conditions]. Germination, height growth and number of branches and leaflets per plant were recorded weekly over a month. Germination started after 4 days and lasted to 9 days, with maximum germination on day 5. It was most in the control seeds (97.5%), and ranged from 80 to 92.5 in the other treatments and seed conditions/types, except that the prechilled seed did not germinate at all. Maximum height and branch growth was in the KNO3 treatment, with significantly lower growth in the thiourea treatment. Plants from black seeds and seeds with coats grew taller than those from white seeds and seeds without coats, while branch production was better in white seeded plants; the presence/absence of the seedcoat did not affect branch production. There were various significant interactions between treatments/conditions/seed type as regards height and branch growth. No treatments/condition/seed types had effects on leaflet production.
    Journal article
    Annals of Agricultural Research, 2000, Vol.21, No.1, pp.148-151 | Indian Grassland and Fodder Research Institute (IGFRI), Jhansi-284 003, India. | 0970-3179
    Keywords : seed germination; forest nurseries; plant growth regulators
    Location : | Uttar Pradesh; India
    Database : CABI, 20000612619

  • A new green revolution, of desert and steppe [sic] zone, by Moringa trees and new irrigation work ; 10th January, 1975 / Tatsumaru Sugiyama. -
    Sugiyama Tatsumaru, International Culture and Welfare Association. 1919

    (No abstract)
    Book
    Fukuoka, Japan : International Culture & Welfare Association, [1975] | |
    Keywords : Afforestation; Deserts; Steppes; Irrigation
    Location : | India
    Database : AGRICOLA, SD409 S9, DNAL SD409.S75

  • Four new species of the genus Basiroides Thorne & Malek, 1968 (Nematoda: Psilenchinae) from Andhra Pradesh.
    Sultana, S., 1980

    Basiroides brevius n.sp. from soil around roots of Abelmoschus esculentus, B. binarius n.sp. and B. siddiqii n.sp. from around tomato and B. macrostriatus n.sp. from around Dolichus lablab, Rumex vesicarius, Moringa oleifera, Cucurbita maxima and Coccinia indica, all from India are described and figured. B. brevius differs from the closely related B. elegans in being smaller and more slender (L = 0.39-0.42 mm), in having a shorter stylet and tail and in the posterior position of vulva (V = 65). B. binarius is closely related to B. beryllus but differs from it in being shorter (L = 0.37-0.42 mm), having a shorter spear, long oesophagus, pyriform basal oesophageal bulb, more posterior position of vulva (V = 67.25) and a bilobed spermathecae. B. siddiqii comes closest to B. conurus but differs from it in being shorter (L = 0.45 mm), with a short spear having minute basal knobs, a pyriform basal oesophageal bulb, a discoid cardia and longer oesophagus. B. macrostriatus is closely related to B. elegans but differs from it in having 4 prominent crenate lateral lines, in being smaller in size (L = 0.70 mm), having a shorter stylet and a smaller tail which is filiform with a finely pointed terminus.
    Journal article
    Geobios, 1980, Vol.7, No.3, pp.134-139, 4 ref. | Zool. Dep., Osmania Univ., Hyderabad-500007, India. |
    Keywords : Vegetables; new species; pests; nematology; oilseed plants
    Location : | India; Asia
    Database : CABI, 19840811864

  • Variations in seedling population of annual moringa
    Suthanthisrapandian, I.R., Sambandamurthy, S. Irulappan, I. 1989

    Of 9 traits studied in a population of 184 seedlings derived by open pollination in M. pterygosperma [M. oleifera ], an important vegetable crop in Tamil Nadu, India, number of flowers/inflorescence, fruit weight and number of fruits/plant showed wide variation, providing ample scope for improvement by selection in the population.
    Journal article
    South Indian Horticulture 37;5, 301-302 | Horticultural Research Station, Periyakulam, India. | 0038-3473
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19911699400

  • Performance of seed moringa genotypes of Periyakulam.
    Suthathirapadian, I. R., Sambandamurthy, S. Irulappan, I. 1992

    Moringa (Moringa pterygosperma [M. oleifera ]) is an important vegetable crop in Tamil Nadu. Some 20 seed types were evaluated for 7 yield-related characters during 1986 and 1987 at Periyakulam. Significant differences in yield among the genotypes were observed in the first, second and ratoon crops. Pod yield/tree ranged from 18.2 to 76.3 in the first crop, from 36.4 to 96.8 in the second crop and from 92.6 to 284.3 in the ratoon crop. The coefficients of variation indicated relatively uniform variation in the productivity of plants in each crop. Pod length ranged from 42.8 to 63.9 cm, pod weight from 73.8 to 15.4 g and number of seeds per pod from 12.8 to 21.3. There were no significant differences for pod girth. MT16, MT11 and MT19 were ranked first, second and third, respectively, based on their yield performance during the three crops.
    Journal article
    Madras Agricultural Journal, 1992, Vol.79, No.5, pp.300-302, 2 ref. | Horticultural Research Station, Periyakulam, Tamil Nadu 625501, India. | 0024-9602
    Keywords : yields; genetics; genetic variation; vegetables
    Location : | India; Tamil Nadu
    Database : CABI, 19941608069

  • The effect of temperature on the germination of Moringa stenopetala , a multipurpose tree.
    Teketay, D., 1995

    Moringa stenopetala is a multipurpose tree used in traditional agroforestry practices in southern Ethiopia. Its leaves and fruits are eaten as vegetables and are also used as fodder; the wood is used for fuel and construction; many parts of the plant have different traditional medical applications. One of the most promising potential applications of the species, however, is to purify turbid water, since its seeds have flocculating and antimicrobial properties. Powder from seeds is being used as a natural coagulant for low-cost water purification. Despite its promising potential, the species has attracted little attention compared with M. oleifera , which is widely cultivated throughout the tropics. The most common method of propagation of M. stenopetala in southern Ethiopia is direct sowing, without pretreatment of seeds. However, very little is known about the temperature requirements of the seeds for germination. To assess the effect of temperature on germination and to find out the optimum germination temperature, seeds were placed in a thermogradient ranging from 10 to 30 deg C. Germination values were 0% (10 deg C), 6% (15 deg C), 85% (20 deg C), 94% (25 deg C), and 76% (30 deg C), suggesting an optimum temperature for the germination of about 25 deg C. Speed of germination was higher at 25 and 30 deg C. It is concluded that areas with appropriate temperature ranges (20-30 deg C) be selected in future agroforestry designs involving the species.
    Journal article
    Tropical Ecology, 1995, Vol.36, No.1, pp.49-57, 21 ref. | Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Faculty of Forestry, Department of Forest Vegetation Ecology, S-901 83 Umea, Sweden. | 0564-3295
    Keywords : seed treatment; temperature; seed germination;
    Location : | Ethiopia
    Database : CABI, 19960608662

  • Destruction of the plant Moringa sp. by a wood eating termite in West Bengal with a note on its symbionts. Enriched title: Destruction of the plant Moringa sp. by a wood eating termite [Coptotermes heimi] in West Bengal with a note on its symbionts [Holo
    Tiwari, D.N., 1977

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Newsl Zool Surv India, June 1977, 3 (3) p. 123. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : | India
    Database : AGRICOLA, QL309 Z6

  • Effect of different levels of soil:sand:compost ratios on emergence rate index, relative root and shoot length on some fruit and forest species.
    Tiwari, R. J., Barholia, A. K. 1994

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Crop Research Hisar 8(1): 77-79. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Comparative growth of agroforestry trees (indigenous vs. exotic) in subtropical western Himalaya.
    Toky, O. P., Khosla, P. K. 1984

    Data are presented on the ht., diam. and estimated bole volume of 6-yr-old trees of 41 indigenous and 5 exotic species raised in the Agroforestry Arboretum at Dhaulakuan [Himachal Pradesh] in the Himalayan foothills. Best ht. growth was shown by Grevillea robusta (9.2 m), Eucalyptus globulus, Populus x euramericana '65/27' [P. '65/27'], Albizzia [Albizia] lebbek and Melia azedarach. Best diam. growth followed a different sequence, with the max. diam. (21.9 cm) in Ailanthus excelsa, followed by Moringa pterygosperma, Albizia lebbek, G. robusta, Melia azedarach, Morus alba and Bauhinia purpurea ; these indigenous species had a 2-4 fold greater bole volume than 3 of the rapidly (ht.) growing exotics (E. globulus, Leucaena leucocephala and P. '65/27'). The most promising leguminous tree was A. lebbek.
    Journal article
    Journal of Tree Sciences, 1984, Vol.3, No.1/2, pp.93-98 | Dep. For., Himachal Pradesh Agric. Univ., Nauni 173 230, Solan, HP, India. |
    Keywords : agroforestry; species trials; mulberries
    Location : | Himachal Pradesh; India
    Database : CABI, 19850605146

  • Compositional study on common top-feeds of Malwa region of Madhya Pradesh.
    Tomar, G. S., 0

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Journal of Maharashtra Agricultural Universities 19(3): 486-487. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Papaver rhoeas and Moringa oleifera, two new hosts of papaya powdery mildew
    Ullasa, B. A., Rawal, R. D. 1984

    These plants were shown to be collateral hosts of Leveillula taurica ; they were infected when growing close to mildewed pawpaw nursery beds in the Bangalore area and symptoms developed on all 3 hosts in cross-inoculation experiments.
    Journal article
    Current Science, India. 53(14): 754-755 | Indian Inst. Hort. Res., Bangalore 560 080, India. |
    Keywords : Pawpaws; hosts; fruit crops; plant pathology; fungi
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19851305616

  • Comparative development of glyceride classes in ripening seeds from 13 plant species producing GS3-nil C16-C18.
    Upadhya, G. S., Narayanaswamy, G. Kartha, A. R. S. 1974

    Determined in 13 species including Pongamia glabra, Moringa pterygosperma, Nerium indicum, Tabernaemontana crispa, Abelmoschus esculentus, Jatropha curcas, J. glandulifera, Terminalia catappa, Mangifera indica and Melia azedarach.
    Journal article
    Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences, 1974, Vol.44, No.12, pp.884-887, 23 ref. | Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi, India. | 0019-5022
    Keywords : fatty acids; metabolism; seeds; horticultural crops; plant composition; acyglycerols
    Location : | Delhi; India
    Database : CABI, 19770353669

  • Effect of soil ESP on the growth and chemical composition of drumstick (Moringa oleifera, Lamk).
    Valia, R. Z., Patil, V. K. Patel, Z. N. 1993

    M. oleifera (a medicinal plant also widely grown for its edible pods) seedlings were grown in naturally sodic (exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP) 41.0) or artificially sodic (ESP 12-60) soils in pots for 12 months. Significant decreases in plant height, number of leaves, stem diameter, plant spread, total leaf area and root length occurred at ESP more than or equal to 41. Root diameter and total root number were approx equal to 3 and 5 times higher, respectively, in control soil (ESP 3.82) than in the sodic soils. At ESP 60, injury symptoms (leaf burns, defoliation, etc.) were visible 120 days after planting and plants died after 240 days. At higher ESPs, leaf, stem and root N, P, K, Ca, Mg and S contents were significantly reduced, while Na contents increased.
    Journal article
    South Indian Horticulture, 1993, Vol.41, No.2, pp.84-90, 6 ref. | Marathwada Agricultural University, Parbhani 431402, Maharashtra, India. | 0038-3473
    Keywords : medicinal plants; plant development; plant composition; metabolism
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19950301108

  • Effects of soil sodicity on dry matter yield and physiological parameters of drumstick.
    Valia, R. Z., Patil, V. K. Patel, Z. N. Kapadia, P. K. 1995

    In a pot experiment Moringa oleifera plants were grown in an Inceptisol with exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP) of 3.82 (control), 12, 24, 36, 41, 48 or 60% obtained through application of NaHCO3. Fresh and dry weight, chlorophyll a and b contents, number of stomata and transpiration rate decreased with increase in soil sodicity. It was concluded that M. oleifera plants can survive up to ESP values of 41%.
    Journal article
    Journal of Maharashtra Agricultural Universities, 1995, Vol.20, No.2, pp.280-281, 3 ref. | Marathwada Agricultural University, Parbhani 431402, Maharashtra, India. | 0378-2395
    Keywords : plant composition; stomata; transpiration; soil salinity
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19970308643

  • Physiological responses of Drumstick (Moringa oleifera Lam.) to varying levels of ESP
    Valia, R. Z., Patil, V. K. Patel, Z. N. Kapadia, P. K. 1993

    Four-month-old rooted cuttings of M. oleifera , a vegetable widely cultivated for its edible pods, were subjected to different concentrations of exchangeable sodium by adding NaHCO3 at 0-176.40 g/10 kg soil in pots. Increasing salinity resulted in decreasing values for plant DW, chlorophyll content, number of stomata and transpiration rate.
    Journal article
    Indian Journal of Plant Physiology, 1993, Vol.36, No.4, pp.261-262, 4 ref. | Marathwada Agricultural University, Parbhani, India. | 0019-5502
    Keywords : salinity; metabolism; stomata; transpiration
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19950307755

  • Effects of soil salinity on physiological parameters of drumstick.
    Valia, R. Z.., Patil, V. K. Kapadia, P. K 1993

    The drumstick (Moringa oleifera ) is widely cultivated in India for its edible pods. Plants were grown in pots at soil electrical conductivities of 4, 8, 12, 16 or 20 dS/m obtained by using a mixture of NaCl, NaHCO3, Na2SO4, CaCl2 and MgSO4. Significant reductions in chlorophyll a and b and the number of stomata were obtained above 4 dS/m. The rate of transpiration increased significantly with salinity, even at 4 dS/m.
    Journal article
    Journal of Maharashtra Agricultural Universities, 1993, Vol.18, No.3, p.455, 5 ref. | Marathwada Agricultural University, Parbhani 431402, India. | 0378-2395
    Keywords : soil salinity; chlorophyll; transpiration; stomata
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19950306411

  • In vitro micropropagation of Moringa pterygosperma .
    Vandina Mohan, Madumati Purohit Srivastava, P. S. 1995

    Micropropagation of M. pterygosperma [M. oleifera ], a medicinal and forestry species, from hypocotyl and cotyledonary explants was achieved. Initially, multiple shoot regeneration was induced on MS medium containing 3% sucrose, and 100 mg L-asparagine, 100 mg L-glutamine and 150 mg m -inositol/litre supplemented with 0.2 mg NAA + 2.0 mg kinetin (M-1) or 0.1 mg NAA and 5.0 mg BA (M-2). Regenerated shoots when transferred to M-2 supplemented with GA3 at 0.2 mg/litre grew further and developed roots. The regenerated shoot tips grown on MS containing only 0.2 mg IBA/litre also produced well-developed roots.
    Journal article
    Phytomorphology, 1995, Vol.45, No.3/4, pp.253-261, 26 ref. | Plant Tissue Culture Laboratory, Department of Environmental Botany, Hamdard University, Hamdard Nagar, New Delhi 110 062, India. | 0031-9449
    Keywords : in vitro culture; propagation; plant growth regulators; plant genetic resources
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19960306070

  • Further new host records of Indarbela sp. (Lepidoptera: Metarbelidae).
    Verma, A. N., Khurana, A. D. 1974

    In surveys in Haryana, India, since 1971, bark-boring larvae of Indarbela sp. were found for the first time on plum, pear, Ficus glomerata, Madhuca longifolia, Moringa oleifera, Eleanthus excellsa, Cassia fistula, Dalbergia sissoo, Acacia arabica (nilotica), Pithecolobium dulce and Prosopis juliflora.
    Journal article
    Haryana Agricultural University Journal of Research, 1974, Vol.4, No.3, pp.253-254, 12 ref. | Department of Entomology, Haryana Agricultural University, Hissar, India. | 0379-4008
    Keywords : food plants; fruit crops; agricultural entomology
    Location : | Haryana; India
    Database : CABI, 19750529413

  • Studies on the factors affecting seed germination of Moringa
    Verma, S. C., 1973

    Studies were made of the seed germination of 6 different tree biotypes of M. oleifera (= M. pterygosperma) and M. concanensis as affected by continuous light v. darkness, watering treatment and sowing depth. The effects of illumination varied between the different clones, and no distinct pattern was evident. Watering twice a day gave better results than watering once a day, and sowing at a depth of 1-3 cm resulted in the highest germination percentage. Storing seeds for 2 months or more was detrimental.
    Journal article
    Plant Science, 1973, Vol.5, pp.64-70, 1 ref. | National Botanic Gardens, Lucknow, India. |
    Keywords : seeds; germination; fatty oil plants
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19750333661

  • Incidence of Poekilocerus pictus (Pyrgomorphidae: Orthoptera) on some new hosts in arid western Rajasthan.
    Verma, S. K., 1998

    Several new hosts of Poekilocerus pictus are reported from western Rajasthan, India. Plumeria alba, Tabernaemontana and Chrysanthemum maximum [Leucanthemum maximum ] were preferred for feeding and Moringa oleifera for adult congregation.
    Journal article
    Entomon, 1998, Vol.23, No.3, pp.233-234, 2 ref. | Central Arid Zone Research Institute, Jodhpur 342 003, India. | 0377-9335
    Keywords : insect pests; plant pests; feeding; forest trees; agricultural entomology
    Location : | India; Rajasthan
    Database : CABI, 19991101254

  • Energy flow in a young plantation of two species of Moringa.
    Verma, S.C., Sahai, R. 1981

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Indian journal of ecology.July 1981. v. 8 (2) p. 147-155. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : | India
    Database : AGRICOLA, QH540 I56

  • Influence of ageing on the seed quality of annual moringa.
    Vijayakumar, R. M., Srimathi, P. Vijayakumar, M. Chezian, N. 1999

    One-year-old seeds of Moringa were stored under ambient conditions and sown in Tamil Nadu, India at 15-day intervals (365 (A1), 380 (A2), 395 (A3), 410 (A4), 425 (A5) and 440 (A6) days) after harvest. Percentage germination, germination rate, plant height and number of branches 60 days after sowing decreased as seed age increased. The decrease in percentage germination was initially slow (96.25% germination in A1 and 78.15% in A3) but accelerated thereafter (51.00% in A6).
    Journal article
    South Indian Horticulture, 1999, Vol.47, No.1/6, pp.275-277, 5 ref. South Indian Horticultural Association, Coimbatore, India | Tamilnadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, India. | 0038-3473
    Keywords : growth; seed aging; seed germination; seed quality
    Location : | India; Tamil Nadu
    Database : CABI, 20013016890

  • Studies on influence of months of sowing and growth regulation on annual moringa (Moringa ptergosperma Gaertn)
    Vijayakumar, R. M., 2000

    (No abstract)
    Thesis
    Ph.D Thesis, TNAU, India | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Attraction of the beetle, Holotrichia consanguinea Blanchard (Scarabaeidae: Coleoptera) to light and host plant.
    Vora, V. J., Ramakrishnan, N. 1991

    The attractive effects of light and various food plants to Holotrichia consanguinea were investigated in laboratory and cage experiments. The food plants tested were Acacia arabica [A. nilotica ], Azadirachta indica, Zyzyphus jujuba [Ziziphus sativa ], Moringa oleifera and Eugenia jambolana [Syzygium cumini ]. H. consanguinea was most attracted to the dimmest intensity of light tested. Blue and green lights were less attractive than violet, red and fluorescent lights. Acacia nilotica and Azadirachta indica were the most attractive food plants.
    Journal article
    Indian Journal of Entomology, 1991, Vol.53, No.1, pp.45-49, 12 ref. | Division of Entomology, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi 110012, India. | 0367-8288
    Keywords : Insect pests; Fatty oil plants; Botanical insecticides; agricultural entomology
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19931168759

  • The potential for the in vitro propagation of a number of economically important plants for arid areas.
    Woods, A., Wickens, G.E.; Goodin, J.R.; Field, D.V. (ed) 1985

    Including Geoffroea decorticans, Prosopis alba, Argania spinosa and Moringa oleifera.
    Conference paper
    Plants for arid lands. Proceedings of the Kew international conference on economic plants for arid lands held in the Jodrell Laboratory, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, England, 23-27 July, 1984, 1985, pp.333-342, 6 ref. George Allen & Unwin, London, UK | Royal Bot. Gdns., Kew, Surrey TW9 3AB, UK. | 0-045-81019-2
    Keywords : Vegetative propagation; embryo culture; tissue culture; arid zones
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19860608889

  • Leaf caterpillar menace on drumstick
    X, 2002

    (No abstract)
    Journal article Web publication
    Indian agricultural ressource centre | information about caterpillar attacks on Moringa leaves and how to get rid of them |
    Keywords :
    Location : http://www.indiaagronet.com/indiaagronet/Technology_Upd/hybrid_onions.htm |
    Database :

  • Management of leaf spot and blight of brinjal using fungicides and plant extracts.
    Yadav, B. P., Rashmi Ojha, K. L. 1998

    Three sprays of Captaf [captan] (0.25%), Blitox-50 [copper oxychloride] (0.35%) and Indofil M-45 [mancozeb] (0.25%) at 20 days interval were significantly superior to other treatments in reducing disease severity caused by Alternaria spp., and increasing the yield of aubergine in microplot trials. Three sprays of carbendazim (0.05%) and Allium sativum extract (2%) were found statistically at par in terms of control efficacy. However, seedling dip in carbendazim (0.05%) for 30 minutes followed by sprays of Moringa pterygosperma [Moringa oleifera ] or Achyranthes aspera leaf extract (3%) had no effect in reducing disease intensity and increasing yield of aubergine.
    Journal article
    Journal of Applied Biology, 1998, Vol.8, No.2, pp.57-60, 9 ref. | Department of Plant Pathology, Rajendra Agricultural University, Pusa Samastipur-848 125, India. |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19991007383

  • A comparative investigation on the physio-chemical properties and some selected enzymes content in the flesh of healthy and Rhizopus stolonifer infected moringa fruit
    Zoadur Rahman, M., Zahangir Alam Saud Absar, Nurul 2001

    The physio-chemical composition of healthy and diseased moringa fruits were investigated at different maturity levels. Of varieties examined, Najna contained highest amount of protein, total sugar, reducing sugar, total soluble solid (TSS), starch and ash while Sajina contained highest amount of total titrable acidity (TTA), moisture, lipid, vitamin C. In both the healthy and diseased conditions, total sugar, reducing sugar, sucrose, TSS, moisture, protein and lipid content were increased but ash, total titrable acidity (TTA) and vitamin C content decreased moderately with the changes of maturity. Starch content changes very rapidly after mature stage. All the nutrient contents under investigation except protein, reducing sugar and ash were decreased after infection of moringa fruits with disease. The activities of all the seven enzymes under investigation were increased after infection of moringa fruits. The activities of catalase and protease increased but that of polyphenol oxidase and ascorbic acid oxidase decreased remarkably with the advancement of maturity stages and the activities of amylase, cellulase and invertase increased upto mature stage and then decreased abruptly.
    Journal article
    Indian Phytopathology. 2001 , vol. 54 , no 3 , pp. 293 - 298 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : INIST, 20377

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  • Utilization of Malunggay (Moringa oleifera Lam.) Leaves in Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Flat Noodle Production
    Abilgos, Risa G., Barba, Corazon V. C. 1999

    The possibility of incorporating Malunggay leaves as source of micronutrients for supplementing rice flat noodle was studied. Five, ten, and fifteen percent of rice flour was substituted with cooked Malunggay leaves slurry. Sensory evaluation revealed that flat noodle with 5 level of supplementation had comparable quality to the control in terms of odor, texture, flavor, and general acceptability. Addition of sauce, sauteeing, and cooking in soup of flat noodles generally improved the sensory quality and acceptability of all treatments. Acceptable flat noodle was perceived to be (1) light green, (2) odorless, (3) with a characteristic bland or flat flavor and (4) chewy and firm in texture. Iron and ? Carotene content increased with level of substitution from 5 to 15 . Nutritional contribution for protein, iron and vitamin A of one serving each of 5 and 10 substituted flat noodles computed as percent recommended dietary allowance (RDA) were found to be significant. A 75 g of 5 malunggay noodle will meet 143 and 134 of the RDA of 4-6 and 7-9 years old children for vitamin A, respectively. Similarly, 328 and 307 of the RDA for Vitamin A will be provided by a serving of 10 malunggay supplemented noodle to 4-6 and 7-9 years old children, respectively.
    Journal article
    Philippine Journal of Science. 1999 , vol. 128 , no 2 , pp. 79 - 84 Science and Technology Information Institute, Manila, Philippines | Rice Chemistry and Food Science Division, Philippine Rice Research Institute, Maligaya, Mu?oz, Nueva Ecija, Philippines. | 0031-7683
    Keywords : leaves; noodles; nutritive value; recommended dietary allowances; retinol; sensory evaluation
    Location : http://www.stii.dost.gov.ph/PJS%20WEB/data/2nd1999.html#961 |
    Database : CABI, 20013089099 INIST, 251

  • Irradiation inactivation of some antinutritional factors in plant seeds.
    Abu-Tarboush, H.M., 1998

    Effects of gamma-irradiation (1.0-10 kGy) on trypsin, chymotrypsin, and alpha-amylase inhibitors of soybean and Moringa peregrina seeds on tannin of sorghum, gossypol of cottonseed, and in vitro digestibility of soybean were investigated. A dose of 10.0 kGy caused decreases in trypsin (by 34.9%) and chymotrypsin (by 71.4%) inhibitor activities in soybean defatted flour, whereas its in vitro digestibility increased from 79.8 to 84.2%. The alpha-amylase inhibitor activity of Al-Yassar (M. peregrina) was decreased by 43.6 and 47.8% upon treatment of 7.0 and 10.0 kGy, respectively. Doses of 10.0 and 7.0 kGy significantly reduced the tannin content in Shahlla sorghum but not in Hemaira sorghum. Total and free gossypol contents were slightly reduced by irradiation.
    Journal article
    Journal of agricultural and food chemistry.July 1998. v. 46 (7) p. 2698-2702. | Department of Food Science and Nutrition, College of Agriculture, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2460, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia. | ISSN 0021-8561.
    Keywords : seeds; flours; food irradiation; antinutritional factors; in vitro digestibility
    Location : NAL, USDA, Beltsville, Md. 20705 - USA. E-mail: gmccone@nal.usda.gov (DNAL 381 J8223). |
    Database : AGRICOLA, 381 J8223 AGRIS, 1999-056453 CABI, 19981415049 INIST, 7332

  • Chemical investigation of the leaves of Moringa stenopetala
    Alemayehu Mekonen, Tarekegn Gebreyesus 2000

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Bull. Chem. Soc. Ethiop. 2000, 14(1), 51-55. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Some antinutritional factors in Moringa peregrina (Al-Yassar or Al-Ban) and soybean products.
    Al-Kahtani, H.A., 1995

    Moringa peregrina and soybean defatted flours, protein concentrates, and isolates were assayed for trypsin (TIA) and alpha-amylase (AIA) inhibitor activities, phytic acid, tannin and chlorogenic acid contents, and in vitro protein digestibility (IVPD). TIA in M. peregrina defatted flour (MDF) was lower (P < 0.05) but more heat resistant than in soybean. AIA in MDF was lower than in soybean and inhibited pancreatic amylase more than bacterial amylase. Some M. peregrina products were higher in phytic acid but lower in chlorogenic acid than soybean. Tannin was low in all samples, IVPD was slightly lower for M. peregrina than for soybean.
    Journal article
    Journal of food science.Mar/Apr 1995. v. 60 (2) p. 395-398. | KING SAUD UNIV., FOOD SCI. DEP. | 0022-1147
    Keywords : soybean products; soybean flour; protein concentrates; trypsin; antinutritional factors
    Location : |
    Database : AGRICOLA, 389.8 F7322 CABI, 19951414891 INIST, 713

  • The wonder oil from the village workshop
    Almeida, S.T., et al. 1988

    (No abstract)
    Newspaper article
    Oman Daily Observer. Muscat. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Moringa: hortali?a arb?rea rica em beta-carotene. Moringa: arboreal vegetable crop rich in beta-carotene.
    Amaya, D. R., Kerr, W. E. Godoi, H. T. de Oliveira, A. L. Salva, F. R. da 1992

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Horticultura Brasileira, 1992, Vol.10, No.2, p.126 | Fac. Eng. Alimentos/UNICAMP, 13084-970 Campinas-SP, Brazil. | 0102-0536
    Keywords : plant composition; beta-carotene
    Location : | Brazil
    Database : CABI, 19941611671

  • Chemical investigation of some
    Anjaneyulu, B., Babu Rao, V. Ganguly, A.K. Govindachari, T.R. Joshi, B.S. Kamat, V.N. Manmade, A.H. Mohamed, P.A. Rahimtula, A.D. Saksena, A.K. Vadre, D.S. Viswanathan, N. 1965

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Indian J Chem 3,237. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Biochemical composition of some unconventional Indian leafy vegetables.
    Awasthi, C. P., Tandon, P. K. 1988

    The nutritional attributes of 15 unconventional leafy vegetables (both cultivated and wild) consumed in different parts of rural India, were determined. Among different vegetables under investigation, the leaves of Moringa oleifera, Glyine max and Solanum nigrum had a high protein value as well as low fibre content which could make them suitable for the extraction of leaf proteins for use as a low-cost source of proteins. Some of these leafy vegetables, particularly the leaves of Trichosanthes dioica, Vicia faba and Carthamus tinctorius, have a high fibre content and would be useful in supplementing the dietary constituents needed for preventing obesity and coronary diseases.
    Journal article
    Narendra Deva Journal of Agricultural Research, 1988, Vol.3, No.2, pp.161-164, 10 ref. | Department of Crop Physiology and Biochemistry, C.S. Azad University of Agriculture and Technology, Kanpur, India. | 0970-230X
    Keywords : Leafy vegetables; nutritive value
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19910306186

  • The nutritive value of Indian foods and the planning of satsfactory diets
    Aykroyd, W.R., 1966

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Indian council of medicinal research. New Delhi pp 55, 61, 91, 97. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Rural nutrition interventions with indigenous plant foods - a case study of vitamin A deficiency in Malawi.
    Babu, S. C., 2000

    Identification, propagation, and introduction of a nutritionally rich, indigenous plant species in the existing cropping system are presented in this paper as a method of rural nutrition intervention. A case study of Moringa (Moringa oleifera Lam.; Moringaceae), which is a common tree in Malawi and one of the richest sources of vitamin A and vitamin C compared to the commonly consumed vegetables is presented to address the problem of vitamin A deficiency. After a brief review of the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency and the efforts to reduce its incidence in Malawi, Moringa is suggested as a potential solution to the problem. A framework for designing nutrition intervention with Moringa is described for actual implementation. It is argued that attempts to identify, document, and encourage the utilization of nutrient-rich indigenous plants could be cost-effective, and a sustainable method of improving the nutritional status of local populations.
    Journal article
    Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Societe et Environnement, 2000, Vol.4, No.3, pp.169-179, Many ref. Facult? des Sciences Agronomiques de Gembloux, Gembloux, Belgium | International Food Policy Research Institute, 2033 K Street, NW. Washington, DC 20006, USA. | 1370-6233
    Keywords : food plants; nutrition; rural areas; retinol; vitamin A deficiency
    Location : http://www.bib.fsagx.ac.be/base/pdf/v4n3/bab-sum.pdf | Malawi
    Database : CABI, 20003000898

  • Analysis of Vitamin A, selenium and zinc content of Moringa
    Bactohem Laboratories, 2000

    (No abstract)
    Analysis
    Bactohem Laboratories in Ness-Ziona, Nov 2000, Israel, in Fuglie L. (ed), 2001, The Miracle Tree: The multiple attributes of Moringa. CTA, Wageningen / CWS, Dakar. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Mineral composition of non-conventional leafy vegetables.
    Barminas, J.T., Charles, M. Emmanuel, D. 1999

    Six non-conventional leafy vegetables consumed largely by the rural populace of Nigeria were analyzed for mineral composition. Mineral contents appeared to be dependent on the type of vegetables. Amaranthus spinosus and Adansonia digitata leaves contained the highest level of iron (38.4 mg/100 g and 30.6 mg/100 g dw, respectively). These values are low compared to those for common Nigerian vegetables but higher than those for other food sources. All the vegetables contained high levels of calcium compared to common vegetables, thus they could be a rich source of this mineral. Microelement content of the leaves varied appreciably. Zinc content was highest in Moringa oleifera, Adansonia digitata and Cassia tora leaves (25.5 mg/100 g, 22.4 mg/100 g and 20.9 mg/100 g dw, respectively) while the manganese content was comparatively higher in Colocasia esculenta. The concentrations of the mineral elements in the vegetables per serving portion are presented and these values indicate that the local vegetables could be valuable and important contributors in the diets of the rural and urban people of Nigeria. The mean daily intake of P, Mg, Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn were lower than their recommended dietary allowances (RDAs). However, the manganese daily intake was found not to differ significantly ( p = 0.05) from the RDA value.
    Journal article
    Plant Foods for Human Nutrition, 1998, vol. 53, no. 1, pp. 29-36(8) Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands | Barminas J.T.[1]; Charles M.[1]; Emmanuel D.[2] [1]Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Technology P.M.B. 2076, Yola Nigeria [2]Department of Chemistry College of Education, Waka, Biu Nigeria | 0921-9668
    Keywords : leafy vegetables; dietary minerals; traditional foods; Mineral composition
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10890755&dopt=Abstract | Nigeria
    Database : AGRICOLA, TX341 P53 CABI, 19991413119 Ingenta, Online articles, SICI (online): 0921-96685312936 INIST, 7104 Pubmed, 10890755 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Carence saisonni?re en vitamine C chez les habitants du Nord-Cameroun
    Bascoulergue, Pierre, Le Berre, Simone 1963

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Nutritio et Dieta (CHE), 1963, No 5, p. 62-68, bibl., tabl. | |
    Keywords : ascorbic acid; vitamin C; therapeutic test; nutritional state; deficiency
    Location : | Extreme North Cameroon; Diamare; Kosewa
    Database : Horizon, F B19989/1

  • Traditional vegetables of ASEAN.
    Bautista, O. K., Kosiyachinda, S. Abd Shukor, A. R. Soenoeadji 1988

    Forty-five species of plants used as vegetables in 4 countries (Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia and Philippines) of the ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations) are classified into 3 groups: (1) Plants used mainly as vegetables, (2) Conventional vegetables with other edible parts, and (3) Plants commonly grown for other purposes with some parts used as vegetables. All species are listed according to family, with their scientific names, common names in English, and names used in Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia and Indonesia. The species used mainly as vegetables are discussed in greater detail. These include Ipomoea aquatica, Psophocarpus tetragonolobus, Amaranthus, Basella alba, Talinum triangulare, Sesbania grandiflora, Coccinia grandis, Centella asiatica, Gnetum gnemon, Moringa oleifera, Parkia speciosa, Sauropus androgynus and Athyrium esculentum.
    Journal article
    ASEAN Food Journal, 1988, Vol.4, No.2, pp.47-58, 10 ref. | Postharvest Research & Training Center, Department of Horticulture, College of Agriculture, University of Philippines at Los Ba?os, Laguna, Philippines. | 1505-5337
    Keywords : Vegetables
    Location : | Thailand; Indonesia; Malaysia; Philippines; South
    Database : CABI, 19910305810

  • Studies on protein and fiber degradabilities and antinutritional factors in Moringa oleifera leaves.
    Becker, 1996

    (No abstract)
    Report
    | Institute for Animal Production in the tropics and Subtropics. University of Hohehheim. Germany. |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • L'arbre nourricier en pays sahelien
    Bergeret, A., 1990

    (No abstract)
    Book
    Ministere de la Cooperation et du Developpement et la Fondation de la Maison des Sciences de l'Homme. Paris. 237p. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Food and nutritional impact of one home garden project in Senegal
    Brun, T., Reynaud, J. Chevassus-Agn?s, Simon 1989

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Ecology of Food and Nutrition (GBR), 1989, Vol. 23, p. 91-108, bibl., tabl. | |
    Keywords : food study; nutritional study; family agriculture; horticulture; women economical role
    Location : | Senegal; Kumbija
    Database : Horizon, F B43385/2; M PM 143/1

  • Les farines infantiles : dossier
    Bruyeron, O. (ed.), Monvois, J. (ed.) Tr?che, Serge (ed.) Ayessaki, B. (collab.) Broutin, C. (collab.) Dard?, C. (collab.) Grongnet, J.F. (collab.) Legros, O. (collab.) Mouquet, Claire (collab.) Salvignol, B. (collab.) Seck, P. (collab.) 1998

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Bulletin du R?seau Technologie et Partenariat en Agroalimentaire (FRA), 1998, No 15, 39 p., ill., tabl., phot. | |
    Keywords : food industry; industrial production; commercialisation; nutritional needs; food composition; condit
    Location : |
    Database : Horizon, F B010014675/2; M B010055606/1

  • Plantes alimentaires de l'Ouest Africain
    Busson, F., 1965

    (No abstract)
    Book
    Leconte, Marseille, France | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Senegal. Preparation of Leafy Vegetable
    Diouf, Me?ssa, 1999

    (No abstract)
    web publication
    Institut senegalais de la recherche agricole - CORAF Action (11) 1999 | cdhisra@sonatel.senet.net a brief summury of a study about leafy vegetables and related practices in Senegal |
    Keywords : agriculture; nutrition; medicine
    Location : http://www.coraf.org/action/ca11en.html |
    Database :

  • Soluble and insoluble oxalates in selected foods.
    Meena, B. A., Umapathy, K. P. Pankaja, N. Prakash, J. 1987

    Oxalates which are known to influence calcium absorption from foods were estimated as total, soluble and insoluble oxalates along with the Ca content in 7 foods. Soluble oxalate content (as percentage of total oxalates) in amaranth (Amaranthus gangeticus [Amaranthus tricolor ]), kilkeerai (Amaranthus tricolor ), drumstick leaves (Moringa oleifera ), horse gram (Dolichos biflorus ), sesame (Sesamum indicum ), cashewnut (Anacardium occidentale ) and almond (Prunus amygdalus ) was 52, 37, 28, 40, 19, 27 and 18; Ca:oxalate ratio was 0.6, 0.6, 3.6, 1.2, 0.9, 0.2 and 0.7, respectively.
    Journal article
    Journal of Food Science and Technology, India, 1987, Vol.24, No.1, pp.43-44, 13 ref. | Dep. Post-Graduate Studies and Research in Home Science, Manasagangotri, Mysore-570006, India. |
    Keywords : Oxalates; foods; leaves; composition
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19871497743

  • Bioavailability trials of beta-carotene from fresh and dehydrated drumstick leaves (Moringa oleifera) in a rat model.
    Nambiar, V.S., Seshadri, S. 2001

    Male albino rats (Charles Foster, n = 40) were fed a synthetic diet deficient in vitamin A for 4 weeks. Six rats died during the depletion period. Of the 34 surviving, 5 rats were continued on the vitamin A deficient diet for 4 more weeks and 24 were repleted with vitamin A (4000 IU/kg diet) in the form of vitamin A acetate (group A, n = 8), fresh drumstick leaves (group B, n = 8) or dehydrated drumstick leaves (group C, n = 8) for 4 weeks. The remaining 10 rats were continued on the vitamin A adequate diet for 4 (n = 5) and 8 weeks, respectively (n = 5). A marked reduction in food intake, body weight, accompanied by clinical signs of vitamin A deficiency and a decline in serum vitamin A (29.2 to 19.1 g/dL) and liver vitamin A (3.7 to 2.0 g/dL) were seen at the end of 4 weeks of feeding a vitamin A deficient diet. On repletion significant improvements in clinical signs, food intake and body weights were noted in the three groups compared to the baseline (n = 5) and at the end of 4 weeks of depletion. The gain in body weight was highest for the group repleted with dehydrated drumstick leaves. Among the repleted groups, the serum vitamin A was highest for group A (34.7 g/dL) given synthetic vitamin A, compared to group B (25.8 g/dL) and group C (28.2 g/dL) given drumstick leaves. All these were significantly higher than the serum vitamin A values seen at the end of 4 weeks of depletion (19.1 g/dL). A significant improvement was also observed in the liver retinol levels on repletion for 4 weeks in the three groups, compared to the vitamin A depleted rats. These results imply that -carotene from drumstick leaves was effective in overcoming vitamin A deficiency although serum vitamin A levels remained somewhat lower compared to the group repleted with vitamin A acetate. In terms of growth parameters, the fresh and dehydrated drumstick leaves were better than the synthetic vitamin A. It is therefore concluded that in the developing countries like India, sources of vitamin A such as drumstick leaves are valuable in overcoming the problem of vitamin A deficiency.
    Journal article
    Plant Foods for Human Nutrition, 2001, vol. 56, no. 1, pp. 83-95 KLUWER ACADEMIC PUBLISHERS GROUP | [1]Department of Foods and Nutrition, Faculty of Home Science, MS University of Baroda, Vadodara 390002, Gujarat, India | 0921-9668
    Keywords : leaves; beta-carotene; bioavailability; liver; blood plasma; rats; Dehydrated drumstick leaves
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11213172&dopt=Abstract |
    Database : AGRICOLA, TX341 P53 Ingenta, Uncover plus, Online articles, SICI (online): 0921-96685618395 INIST, 7104 Pubmed, PMID: 11213172 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Analysis of leaf powder for nutritional composition
    CAMPDEN CHORLEYWOOD Food Research Association, 1998

    (No abstract)
    Analysis
    Report on findings, in Fuglie L. (ed), 2001, The Miracle Tree: The multiple attributes of Moringa. CTA, Wageningen / CWS, Dakar. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • In-vitro availability of iron in various green leafy vegetables.
    Chawla, S., Saxena, A. Seshadri, S. 1988

    Iron availability in vitro was in amaranth (Amaranthus spinosus ), colocasia (Colocasia antiquorum ), drumstick (Moringa oleifera ), fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum ), shepu (Peucedanum graveolens ) and spinach (Spinacia oleracea ) 2.8, 3.6, 3.4, 4.6, 3.7 and 2.8% total Fe, respectively. The green leafy vegetables contained total Fe 99, 160, 125, 51, 109 and 66 mg/kg, ionizable Fe 4.9, 6.6, 6.2, 8.8, 7.0 and 5.0% total Fe, ascorbic acid 992, 641, 1525, 571, 265 and 290 mg/kg, and oxalic acid 7.83, 0.94, 1.01, 0.16, 2.08 and 6.62 g/kg, correspondingly. The results indicated that the availability of Fe in vitro from different green leafy vegetables was neither a function of their total Fe content nor related to their ascorbic acid content, but slightly affected by their oxalate content.
    Journal article
    Journal Of The Science Of Food And Agriculture 46(1): 125-128. | S. Seshadri, Dep. Foods and Nutrition, MS Univ., Baroda, India. | 0022-5142
    Keywords : Vegetables; iron
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19891410646

  • Alpha-tocopherol content in 62 edible tropical plants.
    Ching, L.S., Mohamed, S. 2001

    Vitamin E was determined by the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. All the plants tested showed differences in their alpha-tocopherol content and the differences were significant (p < 0.05). The highest alpha-tocopherol content was in Sauropus androgynus leaves (426.8 mg/kg edible portion), followed by Citrus hystrix leaves (398.3 mg/kg), Calamus scipronum (193.8 mg/kg), starfruit leaves Averrhoa belimbi (168.3 mg/kg), red pepper Capsicum annum (155.4 mg/kg), local celery Apium graveolens (136.4 mg/kg), sweet potato shoots Ipomoea batatas (130.1 mg/kg), Pandanus odorus (131.5 mg/kg), Oenanthe javanica (146.8 mg/kg), black tea Camelia chinensis (183.3 mg/kg), papaya Carica papaya shoots (111.3 mg/kg), wolfberry leaves Lycium chinense (94.4 mg/kg), bird chili Capsicum frutescens leaves (95.4 mg/kg), drumstick Moringa oleifera leaves (90.0 mg/kg), green chili Capsicum annum (87 mg/kg), Allium fistulosum leaves (74.6 mg/kg), and bell pepper Capsicum annum (71.0 mg/kg). alpha-Tocopherol was not detected in Brassica oleracea, Phaeomeria speciosa, Pachyrrhizus speciosa, Pleurotus sajor-caju, and Solanum melongena.
    Journal article
    Journal of agricultural and food chemistry.June 2001. v. 49 (6) p. 3101-3105. American Chemical Society, Washington, USA | Faculty of Food Science and Biotechnology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang Selangor, Malaysia. | 0021-8561
    Keywords : edible species; tropics; fruit; vegetables; vitamin content; alpha-tocopherol
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11410015&dopt=Abstract | Malaysia
    Database : AGRICOLA, 381 J8223 CABI, 20013092176 INIST, 7332 Pubmed, PMID: 11410015 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Vitamin contents of the flowers and seeds of Moringa oleifera.
    Dahot, M. U., 1988

    Flowers of Moringa oleifera were collected during November/December and seeds in the dry state from mature fruit in June to August. Contents were estimated according to standard methods. A significant amount of thiamin, riboflavin, nicotinic acid, folic acid, pyridoxine, ascorbic acid, -carotene and -tocopherol were detected in seeds and flowers. Flowers were particularly rich in riboflavin, ascorbic acid, nicotinic acid and folic acid. Seeds contained significantly more thiamin, -carotene and -tocopherol. A comparison is tabulated with 7 popular vegetables considered to be good sources of those vitamins. Results indicate that flowers and seeds of Moringa oleifera contain more of the vitamins.
    Journal article
    Pakistan Journal of Biochemistry, 1988, Vol.21, No.1-2, pp.21-24, 20 ref. | Department of Biochemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Sind, Jamshoro, Sind, Pakistan. | 0300-8185
    Keywords : flowers; vitamins; seeds
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19901453044

  • Foliar nutrient and nutritive content of Central American multipurpose tree species growing at Comayagua, Honduras.
    Hunter, I. R., Steward, J. L. 1993

    Seedlings from a collection of 20 Central American dryland tree and shrub species were planted in the Comayagua valley on alluvial soil, within their native range. The species comprised Moringa oleifera, Leucaena salvadorensis, Mimosa tenuiflora, Gliricidia sepium, Guazuma ulmifolia, Parkinsonia aculeata, Albizia niopoides, Acacia deamii [Acacia deanei ], Acacia farnesiana, Caesalpinia coriaria, Caesalpinia eriostachys, Albizia saman, Senna atomaria, Simarouba glauca [Quassia simarouba ], Prosopis juliflora, Crescentia alata, Cordia alliodora, Swietenia humilis, Enterolobium cyclocarpum and Hymenaea coubaril [Hymenaea courbaril ]. Their performance and nutritional health in their native range is of interest to foresters growing them as exotics. Foliage samples were collected from the trees in a replicated, designed trial at the end of their second growing season. There were very large variations in foliar nutrient content between species (threefold for nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium; sevenfold for calcium and magnesium; and sixfold for boron), which were not related simply to the relative size differences of the plants. It is suggested that there could be an opportunity to use particular species to increase specific soil nutrient levels by mulching, or to use fodder to redress animal health problems caused by poor mineral nutrition. Four of the species tested might be poor sources of animal fodder - Quassia simarouba and Crescentia alata because of low N content and high fibre content, and Caesalpinia coriaria and Caesalpinia eriostachys because of high lignin content.
    Journal article
    Commonwealth Forestry Review, 1993, Vol.72, No.3, pp.193-197, 19 ref. | Natural Resources Institute, Chatham Maritime, Kent, UK. | 0010-3381
    Keywords : broadleaves; plant composition; plant nutrition; foliage; chemistry; forest plantations
    Location : | Honduras
    Database : CABI, 19930671981

  • Unconventional roughages.
    ICAR, 1987

    The nutritive values (digestible crude protein and total digestible nutrients) in ruminants of some unconventional roughages used in different regions of India are given. Roughages include (1) tree leaves: pipal (Ficus religiosa ), male bamboo (Dendrocalamus strictus ), neem (Azadirachta indica ), mulberry (Morus australis syn. M. indica ), ber (Ziziphus mauritiana syn. Z. jujuba ), cassava (Manihot esculenta ), ardu (Ailanthus excelsa ), bhimal (Grewia oppositifolia ), bakli (Anogeissus latifolia ), drumstick (Moringa oleifera ) and pilkhan (Ficus lacor syn. F. infectoria ); (2) grass and weeds: kans (Saccharum spontaneum ), munj (Saccharum munja ), lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus ), gokhru (Tribulus terrestris ), kasni (Cichorium intybus ); (3) straws: cereal, groundnut and rape; and (4) husks: rice, coffee, groundnut and maize.
    Journal article
    VET, 1987, Vol.1, No.3, pp.131-135 | |
    Keywords : leaves; nutritive value; Weeds; Straw; Husks
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19901424040

  • Free amino acids and carotenes in the leaves of Moringa oleifera Lam. Syn Moringa pterygosperma Gaertn.
    Das, J.M., 1965

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Curr Sci 34, 374. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Teneur en provitamine A de feuilles vertes traditionnelles du Niger. Provitamin A content of traditional green leaves from Niger.
    Delisle, H., Bakari, S. Gevry, G. Picard, C. Ferland, G. 1997

    168 samples of 15 plant species (Adansonia digitata , Amaranthus hybridus , Cassia tora , Corchorus tridens , Gynandropis gynandra , Hibiscus sabdariffa , Moringa oleifera , Vigna unguiculata , Allium cepa , Cassia occidentalis , Tribulis terrestris , Ceratotheca sesamoides , Hibiscus esculentus , Leptadenia hastata and Maerua crassifolia ) were collected during the rainy season from 3 different villages in western Niger. In each village, 3 different women provided a sample of every leaf species available for every processing method used. The mean provitamin A level for the 57 samples of dried leaves was 2273 plus or minus 1152 retinol equivalents (RE)/100 g, ranging from a low of 861 in A. digitata to a high of 3681 in C. sesamoides . The variance was very high and significant differences were observed among plant species and collection sites. Fresh boiled leaves had 1333 plus or minus 596 RE/100 g and steamed leaves 928 plus or minus 526 RE/100 g. For fresh leaves, in addition to species and site, the cooking method was significantly associated with the provitamin A level. For 4 species cooked either way boiled leaves had a higher provitamin A content than steamed leaves, on a fresh and dry weight basis; this difference could not be ascribed to cooking time. Per dry weight unit, leaves collected in the dried state had roughly half the provitamin A content of samples cooked fresh and steamed leaves had half as much provitamin A as boiled samples of the same species. After adjustment for the processing method, species with the highest level of provitamin A, on a dry weight basis, were A. cepa , C. sesamoides and H. sabdarifa . It is suggested that fresh boiled greens should be distinguished from other green leaf dishes, in view of their provitamin A content. Based on children's food intake data, the estimated contribution of green leaves was on average two-thirds of the safe retinol intake level, but with a wide range.
    Journal article
    Cahiers Agricultures, 1997, Vol.6, No.8, pp.553-560, 20 ref. | D?partement de nutrition, Facult? de m?decine, Universit? de Montr?al, CP 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montr?al (Qc), Canada. | 1166-7699
    Keywords : leafy vegetables; vitamins; processing; boiling; drying
    Location : http://aupelf-uref.org/revues/agri/6.97/etu1.htm |
    Database : CABI, 19981410687

  • Consumption pattern of carotene rich foods and development of a year calendar.
    Devadas Rajammal, P., Chandrasekhar, U. Premakumari, S. Saishree, R. 1996

    The consumption pattern of -carotene rich foods in 500 households in Coimbatore, India, was studied. Green leafy vegetables, particularly agathi (Sesbania grandiflora ), drumstick leaves (Moringa oleifera ) and amaranthus (Amaranthus gangeticus ) [Amaranthus tricolor ], were inexpensive sources of -carotene. From data on availability, season and cost, a year calendar of -carotene-rich foods for the district was developed. The amount and cost of these foods to meet the pre-school child and adult requirements of vitamin A was calculated. The effects of cooking (boiling, steaming, shallow fat frying) on the -carotene content of 5 commonly consumed foods, drumstick leaves, mullakeerai (A. spinosus ), thandukeerai (A. gangeticus ), carrot (Daucus carota ) and pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima ) were studied. Cooking losses were maximum in boiling and minimum in frying. The year calendar could be used to select high-carotene foods for increasing the beta-carotene intake in the community.
    Journal article
    Biomedical and Environmental Sciences, 1996, Vol.9, No.2/3, pp.213-222, 3 ref. | Avinashilingam Institute for Home Science and Higher Education for Women, Deemed University, Coimbatore 641 043, India. | 0895-3988
    Keywords : retinol; cooking; vitamins; vegetables
    Location : | India; Tamil Nadu
    Database : CABI, 19971408472

  • Vitamin content in Moringa pod vegetable.
    Dogra, P.D., Singh, B.P. Tandon, S. 1975

    Four clones of Moringa oleifera were selected for the sweetness of their pod-like fruits, which are used as a vegetable throughout India. The ascorbic acid content ranged from 91.51 to 126.41 mg/100 g pulp.
    Journal article
    Current Science, 1974, Vol.44, No.1, p.31, 4 ref. | National Botanic Gardens, Lucknow, India. | 0011-3891
    Keywords : ascorbic acid; composition; fruits; plant composition; tropical crops; spice plants
    Location : | India
    Database : AGRICOLA, 475 SCI23 CABI, 19750330863

  • Wild-food Plants in Southern Ethiopia: Reflections on the role of ?famine-foods? at a time of drought
    Guinand Y, Lechassa D 2002

    (No abstract)
    web publication
    University of Pennsylvania | a survey of wild-food plants in Southern Ethiopia |
    Keywords :
    Location : http://www.sas.upenn.edu/African_Studies/Hornet/famp0300.html | Ethiopia
    Database :

  • Nutrient contents and antinutritional factors in conventional and non-conventional leafy vegetables.
    Gupta, K., Barat, G. K. Wagle, D. S. Chawla, H. K. L. 1989

    Tender green leaves of conventional and non-conventional vegetables were evaluated for nutritional and antinutritional factors, which depict their quality. Crude protein, ether extract and ash varied from 15.7 to 28.5, 1.0 to 6.5 and 9.2 to 20.4%, respectively. Amaranthus flavus (amaranth), Colocasia esculenta (colocasia), Moringa oleifera (drumstick), Trigonella foenum-graecum (fenugreek), Azadirachta indica (neem) and Telfairia occidentalis (pumpkin) are good sources of neutral-detergent fibre (NDF) and acid-detergent fibre (ADF). Those vegetables are rich sources of major and trace elements. Calcium, phosphorus and zinc varied from 0.9 to 2.9, 0.4 to 1.2% and 17.5 to 46.2 mg/kg, respectively. Drumstick contained most flatus factors (sucrose + raffinose + stachyose) (5.6%) followed by neem (3.2%) and colocasia (2.2%). Amaranth had most nitrate, oxalate, trypsin inhibitor and phytate. Amounts of amino acids were variable in those vegetables. Protein was positively correlated with NDF, copper, iron, Zn and manganese, and negatively correlated with ADF, phytate, phenol and saponin contents. Saponin was positively correlated with sugar, Fe and Zn contents. Phytate was negatively correlated with saponin, Cu, Zn, NDF and ADF but positively correlated with phenol.
    Journal article
    Food Chemistry 31(2): 105-116. | Dep. Chemistry and Biochemistry, Haryana Agricultural Univ., Hisar 125004, India. | 0308-8146
    Keywords : Leafy vegetables; nutritive value
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19891412850

  • The nutritional quality and acceptability of weaning foods incorporating amaranth.
    Rathod, P., Udipi, S. A. 1991

    Weaning foods (24 mixtures) were prepared in India with 3 main ingredients: the cereal (malted wheat, raw milled rice, puffed rice or rice flakes); grain amaranth (roasted, malted or puffed); dried green leafy vegetable (spinach or drumstick leaves (Moringa oleifera )). Mixtures based on malted wheat provided most energy, protein and retinol. The rice-based mixtures provided less protein, although addition of powdered milk improved protein content. Mixtures with spinach provided more iron and retinol than did those with drumstick leaves. Intake and acceptability trials were made with 25 children 6 to 18 months old of the mixtures from each of the 4 cereal groups which were found to be most acceptable in sensory evaluation trials. Of the mothers 76 to 85% reported that the mixtures were accepted by their children. There were significant increases (P <0.01) in all nutrient intakes during the trial with the increase in energy, Fe and retinol greater than that for protein and calcium. Mean intake of mixtures was from 58 to 78 g daily.
    Journal article
    Food and Nutrition Bulletin, 1991, Vol.13, No.1, pp.58-64, 8 ref. | Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Department of Postgraduate Studies and Research in Home Science, SNDT Women's University, Bombay, India. | 0379-5721
    Keywords : Infant feeding; weaning; Food products; infant foods
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19921448501

  • Nutritional study on drumstick seed (Moringa oleifera) oil.
    Raval, D. A., Toliwal, S. D. 1996

    The drumstick seed (Moringa oleifera ) oil was refined and analysed to determine its chemical characteristics and fatty acid composition. The major fatty acid in the oil was oleic comprising 76.8% of the total fatty acids in the oil along with palmitic, stearic, linoleic, linolenic and arachidic acids. The oil was fed, for 28 days, to weanling albino rats to study its nutritional effects. At 10% in the diet, the oil promoted a growth rate comparable to that of diet containing groundnut oil. No adverse effect of the drumstick seed oil was observed.
    Journal article
    Journal of the Oil Technologists' Association of India, 1996, Vol.28, No.1, pp.3-5, 11 ref. | R.P.T.P. Science College, Vallabh Vidyanagar-388120, India. | 0970-4094
    Keywords : growth; toxicity; seed oils; composition; nutritive value; fatty acids
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19961407628

  • Kesan merebus ke atas kandungan zat sayuran kekacang. (Effect of boiling on the nutrient contents of vegetable legumes.)
    Hashim, N., Mohsan, L. 1985

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Pertanika. Aug 1985. v. 8 (2) p. 289-295. | |
    Keywords : vegetables; boiling; nutrient contents
    Location : |
    Database : AGRICOLA, S19 P4

  • Nutrient content of the edible leaves of seven wild plants from Niger.
    Freiberger C.E., Vanderjagt D.J. Pastuszyn A. Glew R.S. Mounkaila G. Millson M. Glew R.H 1998

    Wild plants play an important role in the diet of the inhabitants of Niger. These plants tend to be drought-resistant and are gathered both in times of plenty as well as times of need. Used in everyday cooking, famine foods may be an important source of nutrients. The goal of this study was to investigate the nutritional role of wild plants in the nig?rien diet. To this end, leaves of seven plants species were analyzed for their mineral, amino acid and fatty acid contents: Ximenia americana, Amaranthus viridus, Corchorus tridens, Hibiscus sabdarifa, Maerua crassifolia, Moringa oleifera, and Leptadenia hastata. Ximenia americana} contained large amounts of calcium. Large quantities of iron were present in Amaranthus viridus. All seven plants contained significant amounts of selenium and phosphorus. Corchorus tridens contained the most protein (19?25% dry weight), and its composition compared favorably to the World Health Organization's standard for essential amino acids. Moringa oleifera contained 17% protein and compared favorably with the WHO standard. Corchorus tridens contained the largest amounts of the two essential fatty acids linoleic and -linolenic acids. These results reinforce the growing awareness that wild edible plants of the Western Sahel can contribute useful amounts of essential nutrients, including amino acids, fatty acids and trace minerals, to human diets.
    Journal article
    Plant Foods for Human Nutrition, 1998, vol. 53, no. 1, pp. 57-69(13) Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands | Freiberger C.E.[1]; Vanderjagt D.J.[1]; Pastuszyn A.[1]; Glew R.S.[2]; Mounkaila G.[3]; Millson M.[4]; Glew R.H.[1] [1]The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA [2]Departm | 0921-9668
    Keywords : Famine foods; Trace minerals; nutritive value; leaves; foliage
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10890758&dopt=Abstract | Niger
    Database : CABI, 19991413120 Ingenta, Online articles, SICI (online): 0921-96685315769 INIST, 7104 Pubmed, 10890758 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • The Miracle Tree/Moringa oleifera : Natural Nutrition for the Tropics
    Fuglie, L., 1999

    (No abstract)
    Book
    Church World Service - 12, Rue Felix Faure BP 3822 - Dakar, SENEGAL Tel : (221) 822 34 40 - Fax : | |
    Keywords :
    Location : www.moringatrees.org |
    Database :

  • Combating malnutrition with moringa
    Fuglie, L., 2001

    (No abstract)
    Article in Book
    in Fuglie L. (ed), The Miracle Tree: The multiple attributes of Moringa. CTA, Wageningen / CWS, Dakar. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Moringa preparations
    Fuglie, L., 2001

    (No abstract)
    Article in Book
    in Fuglie L. (ed), The Miracle Tree: The multiple attributes of Moringa. CTA, Wageningen / CWS, Dakar. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Natural nutrition for the tropics
    Fuglie, L., 2001

    (No abstract)
    Article in Book
    in Fuglie L. (ed), The Miracle Tree: The multiple attributes of Moringa. CTA, Wageningen / CWS, Dakar. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Influence of protein and fat on the utilisation of carotene from drumstick (Moringa oleifera) leaves. Enriched title: Influence of protein and fat on the utilisation of carotene from drumstick (Moringa oleifera) leaves [Food and nutrition]
    Geervani, P., Devi, A. 1981

    The effect of protein and fat on the utilization of carotene derived from drumstick (Moringa oleifera) leaves was studied with weanling rats. Rats given a diet with 5% protein had less vitamin A and more carotene in serum and liver; rats given a diet with 10% protein had more vitamin A and less carotene in serum and liver. Rats given a diet with animal protein stored more vitamin A in the liver. When fat in the diet was decreased from 10 to 5%, vitamin A in liver decreased but did not change in plasma. Rats given drumstick leaves stored less vitamin A than did rats given pure beta -carotene or vitamin A acetate.
    Journal article
    Indian Journal of Medical Research, 1981, Vol.74, No.October, pp.548-553, 19 ref. | Dep. Foods and Nutrition, College of Home Science, AP Agricultural Univ., Hyderabad 500004, India. |
    Keywords : protein intake; fat consumption; carotenes
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=7338379&dopt=Abstract | India
    Database : AGRICOLA, 448.8 IN22 CABI, 19821439437 Pubmed, 7338379 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Nutritive value of indian foods
    Gopalan, et al. 1971

    (No abstract)
    Book
    1971 (revised 1989) Hyderabad, Indian: National Institute of Nutrition, Indian Council of Medical Research | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Use of legumes and green leafy vegetables for infant and young child feeding: summary of results of studies in three different parts of India.
    Gopaldas, T., Ramakrishnan, I. Grewal, T. Rajalakshmi, R. Devadas, R. P. 1973

    A survey in rural areas of Madhya Pradesh in April and May 1972 included 360 families in 17 villages in a tribal and a non-tribal district, Dhar and Sehore. Diet of children aged 6 to 36 months studied by oral questionnaire for 216 families, and attitudes to food, child care and health were noted for 261 families. Proportion of children eating dhal (split dried legume seed) rose markedly with age and the daily intake, among those who ate dhal, was about 25 g on average. It varied widely even in age groups. The most frequently eaten, in descending order, were Cajanus cajan dhal, Cicer arietinum flour, Phaseolus aureus dhal, Cicer arietinum dhal and fresh in the pod. The last is eaten in season as a vegetable but is thought indigestible for very young children. Dry legumes are classed as "hot" and conducive to flatulence, constipation and phlegm. Phaseolus mungo is "heavy" as well as hot. Only P. aureus is "light" and easily digested. Children under 2 years of age are given Cajanus cajan and P. aureus well mashed as a soup. Flatulence is the reason given for withholding dried legume from young children, but legumes are recognised as "strength-giving".In Gujarat at a rural play centre, children aged 8 months to 5 years in feeding trials lasting several months were given wheat:Bengal gram [Cicer arietinum] 4:1 and leafy vegetables, cooked by traditional methods. There was no ill effect and nutritional status improved. Children to 2 years of age could take 30 to 40 g of the mixture and 15 to 30 g green vegetable; older children took 100 to 120 g mixture and 20 to 30 g green vegetable. In one study, children aged 2 to 5 years got wheat:gram:groundnut 1:1:2. Children tolerated grain better than beans.In Coimbatore, locally available legumes and cereals were prepared by simple recipes to suit the convenience of rural mothers and the taste of the children. Infants aged 6 months to a year got them cooked, mashed and strained to a soup; children aged 1 to 3 years got traditional recipes. Mixtures provided cereal 25, legume 10 g, a feed for infants, and cereal 40, legume 20 g for children. Other recipes had legume 10, green vegetable 15 g for infants and 30 g each for children; some recipes included more than one legume. Legumes studied were Cajanus cajan, Cicer arietinum, Dolichos biflorus, Phaseolus aureus and P. mungo. Of green leafy vegetables, Amaranthus spinosus and A. tristis were preferred to Sesbania grandiflora or Moringa oleifera, that were more coarse and bitter. Vegetables had to be mixed with the other foods because the infants would not eat them alone. Mixtures were well accepted in long-term feeding and there was no digestive disturbance.
    Journal article
    PAG Bulletin, 1973, Vol.3, No.2, pp.51-53 | |
    Keywords : children; infants; feeding; leafy vegetables
    Location : | India; Madhya Pradesh
    Database : CABI, 19731412294

  • A survey of the nutritional and haemagglutination properties of several tropical seeds.
    Grant, G, More, L. J. McKenzie, N H Dorward, P M Stewart, J C Telek, L. Pusztai, A. 1991

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Livestock Research for Rural Development, Volume 3, Number 3, December 1991 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : http://www.cipav.org.co/lrrd/lrrd3/3/tropap.htm |
    Database :

  • Nutritional and haemagglutination properties of several tropical seeds.
    Grant, G., More, L. J. Mckenzie, N. H. Dorward, P. M. Buchan, W. C. Telek, L. Pusztai, A. 1995

    The nutritional potential of a number of raw tropical seeds was assessed in a series of feeding trials with rats. Seed lectin reactivity was also monitored. -amylase and trypsin inhibitory activities were determined in some of the seeds. Abelmoschus esculentus, Chenopodium quinoa, Delonix regia, Macroptilium lathyroides, Papaver somniferum, Parkia biglandulosa, Sesbania arabica, Terminalia catappa, Vigna subterranea, Vigna umbellata and Vigna unguiculata seeds supported moderate rat growth. The seeds contained only low levels of essentially non-toxic lectin, moderate amounts of trypsin inhibitors and negligible quantities of -amylase inhibitors and they have great potential as dietary protein sources for man and animals. Artocarpus altilis, Canavalia ensiformis, Canavalia maritima, Dioclea grandiflora, Phaseolus acutifolius, Phaseolus coccineus and Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Processor, cv. Rosinha G2 and cv. Carioca 80 seeds were toxic. These seeds contained high levels of potentially toxic lectins. Other antinutritional factors may also have contributed to the high oral toxicity of some of these seeds. Albizia adinocephala, Albizia lebbeck, Bauhinia violacea, Cassia nodosa, Cassia tora, Dioclea sclerocarpa, Entada phaseoloides, Enterolobium cyclocarpum, Leucaena leucocephala and Moringa oleifera seeds were also highly toxic but had only low levels of essentially non-toxic lectins suggesting that the toxicity was due to other anti-nutritional factors. Bauhinia reticulata, Macrotyloma uniflorum and Tamarindus indica proteins were poorly digest and utilized. The seeds contained low levels of lectins which agglutinated only rat and cattle erythrocytes which had been pre-treated with suitable proteases. Brownea macrophylla had a similar lectin reactivity
    Journal article
    Journal of Agricultural Science. 1995 , vol. 124 , pp. 437 - 445 | Rowett Research Institute, Greenburn Road, Bucksburn, Aberdeen AB2 9SB, UK. | 0021-8596
    Keywords : haemagglutination; antinutritional factors; toxicity; nutritive value; seeds
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19951410585 INIST, 673

  • (Aminoacids, amides, organic acids found)
    Joshi, G.V., Majumdar, I.M. 1959

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    J. Univ. Bombay. 28(46):11 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Effect of wilting on the ascorbate content of selected fresh green leafy vegetables consumed in Sri Lanka.
    Kailasapathy, K., Koneshan, T. 1986

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Journal of agricultural and food chemistry. Mar/Apr 1986. v. 34 (2) p. 259-261. | |
    Keywords : vegetables; ascorbic acid; wilting
    Location : | Sri Lanka
    Database : AGRICOLA, 381 J8223

  • The effect of boiling, steaming, pressure cooking and panning on the mineral and vitamin content of three vegetables.
    Kamalanathan, G., Giri, J. Jaya, T. V. Priyadarsani, P. 1974

    The retention of Fe, Ca, P, vitamin C, thiamin and riboflavin by drumsticks (Moringa), cluster beans and French beans after boiling, steaming or cooking under pressure was studied. It was difficulty to judge which was the best method of cooking because the same method caused loss of different nutrients to different degrees, in the same vegetable. Pressure cooking was considered best as it gave the maximum retention of minerals and vitamins.
    Journal article
    Indian Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics, 1974, Vol.11, No.1, pp.10-19 | Sri Avinashilingam Home Science College for Women, Coimbatore-641011, India. | 0022-3174
    Keywords : minerals; vitamins; cooking; vegetables
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19741421012

  • Table des aliments du Nord-Cameroun
    Le Berre, Simone, 0

    (No abstract)
    Report
    ORSTOM, Yaound? (CMR), 0000, 22 p., tabl. | |
    Keywords : composition table; analysis method; taxonomy; vernacular name; nutritional value
    Location : | Extreme North Cameroon; Mayo Tsanaga; Mayo Sava; D
    Database : Horizon, F B00279/1; M B00279/1

  • Suppl?mentation pr?natale en fer/folates et retard de croissance staturale chez le jeune enfant : enqu?te r?trospective en milieu urbain s?n?galais
    Lioret, Sandrine, 1997

    (No abstract)
    Book
    ORSTOM, Dakar (SEN), 1997, 82 p. multigr., bibl., cart. : 1, ill., tabl., graph. - M?m. DESS : Nutrition et Alimentation dans les Pays en D?veloppement, Universit? de Montpellier 2 : Montpellier, 1997 | |
    Keywords : nutritional epidemiology; food fortification; nutritional state; anaemia; malnutrition
    Location : | Senegal
    Database : Horizon, F A010016441/1; D MEM 429 LIO/1

  • Energy and micronutrient composition of dietary and medicinal wild plants consumed during drought. Study of rural Fulani, northeastern Nigeria.
    Lockett CT, Calvert, C.C. Grivetti, L.E. 2000

    Two rural settled Fulani villages, northeastern Nigeria, were surveyed for dietary practices and use of edible wild plants (n = 100 households). Commonly consumed species of edible wild barks, fruits, leaves, nuts, seeds, and tubers were analyzed for protein, fat, and carbohydrate and for minerals. Kuka bark (Adansonia digitata) given to infants to increase weight gain was high in fat, calcium, copper, iron, and zinc. Cediya (Ficus thonningii), dorowa (Parkia biglobosa) and zogale (Moringa oleifera) were good sources of protein and fat and excellent sources of calcium and iron or copper and zinc. Fruits, leaves, and nuts of aduwa (Balanites aegyptiaca) were widely used during the dry season and during drought. Edible wild species available during the wet season generally were inferior in energy and micronutrient mineral content compared to dry season plants. Fruits commonly eaten by children were poor sources of protein and minerals but rich in carbohydrate and fiber. Tsamiya seeds (Tamarindus indica) were good sources of zinc and used to make dawwa (porridge) commonly consumed during pregnancy. Kirya seeds (Prosopos africana) contained the highest zinc concentrations. Shiwaka leaves (Veronia colorate) consumed by pregnant women to increase breastmilk production and to expel intestinal worms, were high in fiber, phosphorus, magnesium, manganese, and were adequate sources of calcium.
    Journal article
    International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, 1 May 2000, vol. 51, no. 3, pp. 195-208(14) Taylor and Francis Ltd | [1] Department of Nutrition, University of California, 1 Peter J. Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA [2] Department of Animal Sciences, University of California, 1 Peter J. Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA | 0963-7486
    Keywords : wild plants; leaves; mineral content; protein sources; weight gain; energy content
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10945116&dopt=Abstract | Nigeria
    Database : CABI, 20001418828 Ingenta, Online articles, SICI (online): 0963-7486(20000501)51:3L.195;1- INIST, 18249F Pubmed, PMID: 10945116 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Nutritional evaluation of tropical leaves for pigs: pepsin/pancreatin digestibility of thirteen plant species.
    Ly, J., Samkol, P. Preston, T. R. 2001

    Thirteen types of tropical trees and shrubs available in the ecological farm of UTA, at Chamcar Daung, Cambodia, were selected for a screening test to evaluate in vitro pepsin/pancreatin digestibility of N and to explore the possible interdependence with other non-conventional tests for assessing nutritive value of foliages for pigs. Leaves and petioles were from Acacia auriculiformis , Artocarpus heterophyllus , Borassus flabellifer , Cocos nucifera , Desmanthus virgatus , Eucalyptus spp, Flemingia macrophylla , Gliricidia sepium , Hibiscus rosasinensis , Leucaena leucocephala , Moringa oleifera , Morus alba and Trichanthera gigantea . DM, N and NDF range of values were 21.0 to 60.9%, 1.27 to 4.13% and 24.1 to 73.0% in dry basis, respectively. It was found that an increase in pepsin/pancreatin, in vitro N digestibility was associated with less NDF-linked N (R2 0.50; P <0.007) and lower dry matter content (R2 0.58; P <0.002) in leaves, and higher values of DM solubility (R2 0.67; P <0.001), in vitro DM digestibility (R2 0.76; P <0.001) and N water solubility (R2 0.82; P <0.001). Highest in vitro N digestibility coefficients were obtained for Moringa oleifera (79.2%), Hibiscus rosasinensis (74.2%), Gliricidia sepium (69.4%) and Morus alba (47.9%). The lowest in vitro N digestibility was observed for palmaceae (Cocos nucifera , 9.4% and Borassus flabellifer , 5.1%). It is suggested that simple, cheap and easy methods can be used for the nutritional evaluation for pigs of leaves of trees and shrubs in the tropical world.
    Journal article
    Livestock Research for Rural Development, 2001, Vol.13, No.5, pp.1-6, 14 ref. CIPAV Foundation, Cali, Colombia | University of Tropical Agriculture Foundation, Royal University of Agriculture, Chamcar Daung near Phnom Penh, Cambodia. | 0121-3784
    Keywords : digestibility; dry matter; fibre; in vitro; nutritive value
    Location : | Cambodia
    Database : CABI, 20013148047

  • Nutritional potential of sajna leaves in goats.
    Mahatab, S. N., Ali, A. Asaduzzaman, A. H. M. 1987

    In a digestibility trial, 4 castrated mature Black Bengal goats of similar age and body weight were given fresh sajna (Moringa oleifera ) leaves and soft twigs ad libitum with free access to water for 7 days. The chemical composition and nutritive value of sajna leaves are given in tables. The mean digestibility coefficients were DM 67.5, crude protein 77.2, crude fibre 50.3, nitrogen free extract 75.9 and organic matter 70.8%. Digestible crude protein content (dry basis) was 14.8 and total digestible nutrients 68.0%. Metabolizable energy was 10.7 MJ/kg DM which did not meet maintenance requirements. Nitrogen retention was 1.67 plus or minus 0.16 g daily.
    Journal article
    Livestock Adviser, 1987, Vol.12, No.12, pp.9-12, 14 ref. | Livestock Research Inst., Mokakhali, Dhaka, Bangladesh. | 0970-3004
    Keywords : nutritive value; Digestibility
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19891418831

  • Nutritive value and antinutritional components of whole and ethanol extracted Moringa oleifera leaves
    Makkar H.P.S, Becker K. 1996

    Chemical constituents, organic matter digestibility, gross and metabolizable energy, rumen degradable and undegradable nitrogen, amino acid composition, digestion kinetics (leaves, their neutral-detergent fiber and cell solubles), and antinutritional factors were determined in extracted (80% aqueous ethanol; the extract is used as a source of growth promoting factors) and unextracted Moringa oleifera leaves. The metabolizable energy and organic matter digestibility predicted from the extent of fermentation in in vitro incubation were 9.2 MJ kg-1 and 75.7% for the extracted leaves and 9.5 MJ kg-1 and 74.1% for the unextracted leaves. The crude protein contents of the extracted and unextracted leaves were 43.5 and 25.1% respectively. The true protein contents of these leaves were 93.8% and 81.3% of the total crude protein (non protein nitrogen contents of 2.7 and 4.7% were observed in the extracted and unextracted leaves). In vitro rumen crude protein degradability at 24 h of incubation was 44.8 and 48.6% for the extracted and unextracted leaves. One of the factors responsible for the low rumen protein degradability could be the low solubility of the proteins (about 7 and 24% of the crude protein was soluble in phosphate buffer (pH 7, 0.05 M) for the extracted and unextracted leaves). The protein insoluble in acid-detergent fiber (ADIP; protein unavailable to animals) was 13.2 and 9.8% in ADF of the extracted and unextracted leaves respectively (absolute values of 22 g and 11 g ADIP kg-1 leaves). The protein potentially digestible in the intestine (PDI) was 50 and 47% of the total crude protein for the extracted and unextracted leaves respectively. The rate (h-1) and potential extent (ml g-1) of gas production calculated using the exponential model for the extracted and unextracted leaves were 0.0424 and 274.3, and 0.0824 and 248.5 respectively. These values for their NDF were 0.0542 and 265.8, and 0.0645 and 271.7 and for their cell solubles were 0.0338 and 286.3, and 0.089 and 242.2 respectively.M. oleifera leaves had negligible tannins; saponins content (5.0% as diosgenin equivalent) was similar to that present in soyabean meal, and trypsin inhibitors and lectins were not detected. The phytate content was 3.1%. The ethanol extracted leaves were virtually free of tannins, lectins, trypsin inhibitors and saponins, and phytate content was 2.5%.All essential amino acids including sulfur-containing amino acids were higher than adequate concentration when compared with recommended amino acid pattern of FAO/WHO/UNO reference protein for a 2 to 5-year-old child.
    Journal article
    Animal Feed Science and Technology, 1 December 1996, vol. 63, no. 1, pp. 211-228(18) Elsevier Science | Institute for Animal Production in the Tropics and Subtropics (480), University of Hohenheim, D-70593 Stuttgart, Germany | 0377-8401
    Keywords : Leaves; Nutrients; In vitro rumen protein degradability; Amino acid composition; Digestion kinetics;
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19971401160 Ingenta, Online articles, DOI (article): 10.1016/S0377-8401(96)01023-1, SICI (online): 0377-8401631211228 INIST, 17215

  • Plant toxins and detoxification methods to improve feed quality of tropical seeds.
    Makkar, H. P. S., Becker, K. Nitis, I.M (ed) Shin, M.T. (ed) 1999

    Many antinutritional and toxic factors abound in tropical seeds, which are also generally rich in nutrients and therefore more prone to attack from herbivores. Antinutritional and toxic factors are considered to defend seeds against environmental vagaries and thus help to protect them. These factors though good for the plant, cause deleterious effects or are even toxic to animals and man. The conventional seeds cultivated for oil or non-oil purposes, and general aspects of antinutritional factors are not presented here as these have already been discussed widely by many workers. Deficits in conventional protein and energy sources in the tropics have stimulated a quest for alternative feeds both for animals and humans. This article attempts to highlight two new oilseed crops, Jatropha curcas and Moringa oleifera , and also deals with some under-utilized seeds with potential as animal feed. Most of these seed plants are adapted to various marginal growing conditions in the tropics and can help to mitigate the prevailing deficit in protein and energy sources. Antinutritional and toxic factors in seed or seed meal, various approaches to detoxify seed meal, and future research and development priorities for their exploitation as animal feeds are presented.
    Conference paper; Journal article
    Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences, 1999, Vol.12, No.3, pp.467-480, 86 ref. | 8th World Conference on Animal Production, Management of feed resources and animal waste for sustainable animal production in Asia-Pacific region beyond 2000, 28 June, 1998, Seoul, Korea Republic. Institute for Animal Production in the Tropics and Subtro | 1011-2367
    Keywords : antinutritional factors; seeds; toxicity; nutritive value; composition; oilseed plants
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19991406217

  • Nutrients and antiquality factors in different morphological parts of the Moringa oleifera tree.
    Makkar, H.P.S., Becker, K. 1997

    Moringa oleifera grows throughout most of the tropics and has several industrial and medicinal uses. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of different morphological parts of this tree as animal feed. The crude protein (CP) content of leaves, soft twigs and stems was 260, 70 and 60 g kg respectively. About 64, 79 and 67 % of the total CP present in the leaves, twigs and stems respectively was found to be degradable after 24 h in the rumen. The protein insoluble in acid detergent fibre (ADIP), considered unavailable to animals, in these samples was 30, 150 and 170 g kg respectively. About 87 % of the total CP was in the form of true protein in the leaves (60 and 53 % in twigs and stems respectively). The leaves had negligible amounts of tannins (12 g kg), and trypsin and amylase inhibitors, lectins, cyanogenic glucosides and glucosinolates were not detected. The saponin content of the leaves was 80 g kg as diosgenin equivalent, which did not show any haemolytic activity. The phytate content of the leaves was 21 g kg. Tannins, saponins, cyanogenic glucosides and glucosinolates were detected in twigs and stems but the concentrations were negligible. Trypsin and amylase inhibitors were not detected in twigs and stems. Phytate contents of both twigs and stems were c. 30 g k. In leaves, amounts of all the essential amino acids were higher than the amino acid pattern of the FAO reference protein and comparable to those in soyabeans. The CP and lipid contents of the kernel were 370 and 420 g kg respectively, and the CP of the meal (fat-free) was 610 g kg. The kernels and meal are extracted with water and the extract is used for the purification of water in some developing countries. The residues left after water extraction of kernels and meal (designated as extracted-kernel and extracted-meal) had a CP content of 350 and 700 g kg respectively and all of this CP was in the form of true protein. After taking into account the ADIP contents in these samples, c. 38 and 69 % of the total protein was calculated to be available in the post-rumen in extracted-kernel and extracted-meal respectively. The pepsin digestibility of these samples was 91 and 84 % respectively. The sulphur-containing amino acids in kernel proteins were present at higher concentrations than those specified in the amino acid pattern of the FAO reference protein but other essential amino acids were deficient. Amongst the antinutritional factors mentioned above, glucosinolates and phytate were present in appreciable amounts (65.5 mol g and 41 g kg respectively) in meal. Haemagglutination activity was also detected in the meal. The extracted-meal was virtually free of all the antinutritional factors examined except for phytate (67 g kg). The leaves of Moringa oleifera and the residue obtained after the recovery of oil and coagulants can be good sources of proteins for animal feeds.
    Journal article
    Journal of Agricultural Science. 1997 , vol. 128 , pp. 311 - 322 | Institute for Animal Production in the Tropics and Subtropics (480), University of Hohenheim, D-70593 Stuttgart, Germany. | 0021-8596
    Keywords : leaves; stems; seeds; nutritive value; digestibility; enzyme inhibitors
    Location : http://www.uni-hohenheim.de/i3ve/00068900/20330041.htm |
    Database : AGRICOLA, 10 J822 CABI, 19970605353 INIST, 673

  • Free glutamic acid in some Philippine fruits and vegetables.
    Mallorca, R., Leon, S. Y. de Lim-Sylianco, C. Y. 1992

    Amino acid extraction and HPLC amino acid analysis were performed on homogenates of the edible parts of 4 fruits (avocado, pineapple, Anona [Annona ] squamosa and watermelon) and 7 vegetables (celery, Pandanus odoratissimus [P. tectorius ], Zingiber officinale, Moringa oleifera, Vigna sinensis [V. unguiculata subsp. sesquipedalis ], Basella rubra [B. alba ] and Psophocarpus tetragonolobos [P. tetragonolobus ]). Moisture, ash and crude soluble protein contents in the fruits ranged from 75.31 (A. squamosa ) to 91.46% (watermelon), 0.13 (watermelon) to 1.75% (pineapple), and 0.84 (watermelon) to 1.48% (A. squamosa ), respectively. The corresponding ranges for the vegetables were 76.97 (P. odoratissimus ) to 96.31% (B. rubra ), 0.47 (P. tetragonolobos ) to 1.79% (Z. officinale ) and 1.97 (Z. officinale ) to 3.22% (P. odoratissimus ). The highest and lowest glutamic acid contents in the fruits were 70 (A. squamosa ) and 8 mg/100 g sample (avocado), respectively, and in the vegetables 200 (M. oleifera ) and 20 mg/100 g sample (Z. officinale ), respectively.
    Journal article
    ASEAN Food Journal, 1992, Vol.7, No.2, pp.108-110, 125, 15 ref. | Institute of Chemistry, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City, Philippines. | 1505-5337
    Keywords : fruits; shoots; leaves; rhizomes; pods; chemical composition
    Location : | Philippines
    Database : CABI, 19930323167

  • Nutritious leaves
    Mann BD, 2002

    (No abstract)
    web publication
    Footsteps | |
    Keywords :
    Location : http://footsteps.tearfund.net/english/pdf/26e.pdf | Zambia
    Database :

  • Preliminary studies on protein extraction from tree leaves.
    Nag, A., Matai, S 1992

    Thirty-one tree species were screened from Ranaghat, West Bengal, and an adjoining area. On the basis of protein extractability (20%) 8 were selected for more detailed analysis: Ailanthus excelsa, Albizia procera, Dalbergia latifolia, Gliricidia sepium, Moringa oleifera, Sesbania grandiflora, Samanea saman [Albizia saman] and Toona ciliata . Albizia saman gave the best nitrogen content (9.95%), and G. sepium the best in vitro digestibility (50.25%). A. procera gave the lowest free polyphenol content (2.17%).
    Journal article
    Indian Journal of Agricultural Biochemistry, 1992, Vol.5, No.1/2, pp.77-81, 6 ref. | Leaf Protein Research Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, 203 b.t. Road, Calcutta 70035, India. | 0970-6399
    Keywords : foliage; leaves; digestibility; nutritive value; chemical composition; forest trees
    Location : | India; Uttar Pradesh
    Database : CABI, 19950611598

  • Cytokinins in developing fruits of Moringa pterigosperma Gaertn.
    Nagar, P.K., Iyer, R.I. Sircar, P.K. 1982

    Zeatin and zeatin riboside were identified in a butanol soluble fraction and a zeatin nucleotide was identified in a butanol insoluble fraction from immature 30-40 cm long M. pterigosperma [oleifera] fruits. Cytokinin activity was measured at 10 stages of maturity (in fruits up to 50 cm long). On a concentration basis the cytokinin level rose until fruits were 15-20 cm long (up to 1.O mu g kinetin equivalents/g fresh weight) and then reached a plateau. On a per fruit basis the cytokinin content peaked at stage 8 when fruits were 35-40 cm long (6.6 mu g kinetin equivalents/fruit). Cytokinin activity was also observed from t-RNA of fruit tissue.
    Journal article
    Physiologia Plantarum, 1982, Vol.55, No.1, pp.45-50, 25 ref. | Calcutta University, Calcutta 700 019, India. | 0031-9317
    Keywords : Zeatin; fruit; development; biochemistry; fatty oil plants; plant growth regulators
    Location : |
    Database : AGRICOLA, 450 P564 CABI, 19820306846

  • Food and fruit trees of The Gambia.
    Szolnoki, T. W., 1985

    After introductory sections on the utilization of food and fruit trees, detailed treatments are given for 40 species, with information on: scientific and common names; characteristics of trees and parts used; cultivation and propagation; food uses, with details on processing and cooking methods given for some species; other uses (including of timber etc.); and overall evaluation. The more intensively utilized species include: Adansonia digitata; Balanites aegyptiaca; Borassus aethiopum; Citrus spp.; Elaeis guineensis; Ficus gnaphalocarpa [F. sycomorus] ; and Parkia biglobosa. A general discussion is presented on developing well-known and underutilized trees and shrubs for food use. Lists are included of common names (with botanical equivalents) in English, French, Fula, Jola, Mandinka, and Wolof; the lists of tribal names include some species not treated in the text.
    Book
    Food and fruit trees of The Gambia., 1985, 132pp., 48 ref. Stiftung Walderhaltung in Afrika, Hamburg, German Federal Republic | Published in conjunction with the Bundesforschungsanstalt f?r Forst- und Holzwirtschaft BFH, Hamburg, German Federal Republic. |
    Keywords : edible species; fruit; woody plants; cultural methods; Oil palms; oilseed plants
    Location : | Gambia
    Database : CABI, 19860610648

  • Rapport de l'evaluation du projet test de lutte contre la malnutrition a base des produits du Moringa oleifera dans la region de Zinguinchor
    Ndiaye, B.S., Sene, A. 1998

    (No abstract)
    Report
    (Unpublished document) | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • An approach to functional food: cancer preventive potential of vegetables and fruits and their active constituents.
    Ohigashi, H., Murakami, A. Koshimizu, K. 1996

    The paper reviews the findings of in vitro studies on the anti-tumour promoting properties of dietary plants and food flavourings and spices in Thailand.
    Conference paper; Journal article
    Nutrition Reviews, 1996, Vol.54, No.11, Part2, pp.S24-S28, 26 ref. | First international conference on East-West perspectives on functional foods. Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-01, Japan. | 0029-6643
    Keywords : vegetables; fruits; flavourings; culinary herbs; medicinal plants; functional foods; neoplasms
    Location : | South east Asia; Thailand
    Database : CABI, 19971404964

  • Compositional and nutritional attributes of seeds from the multiple purpose tree Moringa oleifera Lamarck.
    Oliveira, J.T.A., Silveira, S.B. Vasconcelos, I.M. Cavada, B.S. Moreira, R.A. 1999

    Moringa oleifera Lam is a multipurpose tree cultivated to use as a vegetable, for spice, for cooking and cosmetic oil and as a medicinal plant. Owing to the use of its seeds as food and as a clarifying agent of turbid water some nutritional and antinutritional characteristics were studied. The mature seeds contained 332.5 g crude protein, 412.0 g crude fat, 211.2 g carbohydrate and 44.3 g ash per kg dry matter. The essential amino acid profile compared with the FAO/WHO/UNU scoring pattern requirements for different age groups showed deficiency of lysine, threonine and valine. The content of methionine + cysteine (43.6 g kg (-1) protein), however, was exceptionally higher and close to that of human milk, chicken egg and cow's milk. The seed extract agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes but did not show trypsin inhibitor and urease activities. Feeding rats with a diet containing the seed meal showed loss of appetite, impaired growth, lower NPU and enlargement of stomach, small intestine, caecum+ colon, liver, pancreas, kidneys, heart and lungs and atrophy of thymus and spleen in comparison with rats fed on an egg-white diet. The results indicated that consumption of M. oleifera raw mature seeds should be viewed with some caution until suitable processing methods are developed to abolish the yet unknown adverse factors.
    Journal article
    Journal of the science of food and agriculture.May 1, 1999. v. 79 (6) p. 815-820. | Departamento de Bioquimica e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Ceara, PO Box 6020, Campus do Pici | 0022-5142
    Keywords : seeds; meal; histopathology; nutritive value; antinutritional factors
    Location : | Brazil
    Database : AGRICOLA, 382 So12 CABI, 19991407795 INIST, 2634

  • Energy and major nutrients in some of Guyana's less known edible plants.
    Omawale, 1979

    The samples of 12 plants collected in the field contained, in 100 g edible portion, protein 0.2 to 9.7, fat up to 45.0, ash up to 3.3, carbohydrate up to 20.3 g and metabolizable energy (ME) 64 to 2044 kJ. Sijan (Moringa oleifera) leaves, kuru (Astrocaryum tucuma) skin and fruit had 9.7, 5.8 and 5.8% protein, respectively. Kuru skin, fruit and kernel had most fat 24.0, 45.0 and 25.2% and ME 1785, 2044 and 1620 kJ/100 g. The ME of the others was 64 to 450.
    Journal article
    Cajanus, 1979, Vol.12, No.3, pp.150-154, 2 ref. | Inst. Social and Economic Research, Univ. West Indies, Jamaica. |
    Keywords : energy; nutrients
    Location : | Guyana
    Database : CABI, 19801404984

  • Availability of calcium from kilkeerai (Amaranthus tricolor) and drumstick (Moringa oleifera) greens in weanling rats
    Pankaja, N., Prakash, J. 1994

    The present study was undertaken to determine the extent of calcium absorption in weanling rats from two types of greens rich in oxalates. The edible portions of greens namely kilkeerai (Amaranthus tricolor) and drumstick (Moringa oleifera) were analysed for moisture, calcium and total and soluble oxalates. Three groups of 6 male weanling albino rats were fed ad libitum on milk diet and two experimental diets containing greens. Urine and faecal samples were collected for a period of 7 days after 5 days of acclimatization period and were analysed for calcium. From the values obtained percent absorption and retention of calcium were calculated. Results revealed that calcium absorption and retention from milk diet (92 and 78%, respectively) were significantly higher than greens
    Journal article
    NAHRUNG. 1994 , vol. 38 , no 2 , pp. 199 - 203 | Department of Studies in Home Science, University of Mysore, Manasa Gangotri, Mysore 570 006, India | 0027-769X
    Keywords : minerals; calcium absorption; oilseed plants; leafy vegetables
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=8196748&dopt=Abstract |
    Database : CABI, 19941411927 INIST, 9262 Pubmed, 8196748 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Nutrition gardens.
    Patil, J. S., 1987

    To overcome the problem of malnutrition among the tribal families of Thane District of Maharashtra, India, a self-help programme of setting up nutrition gardens was initiated. The populations were encouraged to grow drumstick (Moringa aptera ) and agasta (Sesbania grandiflora ) as vegetable trees, and mango (Mangifera indica ), seetaphal (Annona squamosa ), jack fruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus ) and bor (Ziziphus mauritiana ). Training was given on common ailments caused by malnutrition, importance of vegetables and fruits in the diet, growing drought-resistant vegetable trees and fruit trees, techniques of plant propagation, simple recipes using fruits and vegetables, and low-cost methods of fruit and vegetable preservation. As a result of the growing of the garden trees, the diet of the tribal families, which hitherto was of cereals, now contains vegetables and fruits.
    Journal article
    Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of India, 1987, No.33, pp.108-110 | Inst. Rural Reconstruction, Bordi-401701, Dist. Thane (M.S.), India. | 0253-7567
    Keywords : Nutrition programmes; Home gardens; fruit trees; Malnutrition; prevention
    Location : | India; Maharashtra
    Database : CABI, 19881408734

  • Les aliments d'origine v?g?tale au Cameroun
    Pel?, Joseph, Le Berre, Simone 1967

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Le Cameroun Agricole, Pastoral et Forestier (CMR), 1967, No 110, p. 49-66, ill. | |
    Keywords : leafy vegetable; tropical food plant; composition table; vernacular name; nutritional value; taxonom
    Location : | Cameroon
    Database : Horizon, F B14525/1

  • Les aliments d'origine v?g?tale au Cameroun
    Pel?, Joseph, Le Berre, Simone 1967

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Le Cameroun Agricole, Pastoral et Forestier (CMR), 1967, No 111, p. 14-34, ill. | |
    Keywords : tropical food plant; vernacular name; nutritional value; taxonomy; mushroom
    Location : | Cameroon
    Database : Horizon, F B14526/1

  • Learn to eat malunggay.
    Philippines, Food and Nutrition Research Institute, 1978

    The leaflet notes that malunggay (Moringa oleifera) is easy to grow, nutritious, cheap and available all the year in the Philippines and advises choosing fresh leaves and young pods [capsules]. Half a cupful of cooked leaves provides the daily requirement of vitamin A and two-thirds of that of ascorbic acid; half a cupful of raw food has the daily requirement of ascorbic acid. Six recipes for dishes with malunggay are given.
    Report
    FNRI Publication, 1978, No.47 | National Science Development Board, Taft-Pedro Gil, Manila, Philippines. |
    Keywords : retinol; ascorbic acid
    Location : | Philippines
    Database :

  • Study of mineral nutrient value of greens.
    Rajkumar, X. R., Durairaj, K. Gnanadickam, C. 1973

    Data are tabulated on the Ca, Fe and Zn contents of fresh leaves of Amaranthus gangeticus, Basella rubra, Alternanthera triandra, Sesbania grandiflora and Moringa sp.
    Journal article
    Current Science, 1973, Vol.42, No.9, p.317, 8 ref. | St. Joseph's College, Tiruchirapalli, Tamil Nadu, India. | 0011-3891
    Keywords : composition; leaves; iron; zinc; calcium; vegetables
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19730312908

  • Moringa a highly nutritious vegetable tree
    Ram, J., 1994

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Tropical Rural and Island/Atoll Development Experimental Station (TRIADES), Technical Bulletin No.2. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Nutritional evaluation of some green leafy vegetables.
    Rao, P. G., Mallikarjuna, K. Rao, G. G. 1980

    Values are tabulated for B vitamins, reducing and nonreducing sugars, starch, protein, and soluble, protein and total nitrogen in cockscomb (Celosia argentea), Amaranthus polygamous, A. tristis, A. viridis, spinach dock (Rumex obtusifolius), cockscomb (Digera arvensis), spearmint (Mentha spicata), Coriandrum sativum, drumstick (Moringa oleifera) and Trianthema portulacastrum. The last, C. argentea, drumstick and A. viridis are rich in nutrients and are vegetables particularly recommended as regular dietary sources.
    Journal article
    Indian Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics, 1980, Vol.17, No.1, pp.9-12, 10 ref. | Dep. Botany, Sri Venkateswara Univ., Tirupati, A.P., India. | 0022-3174
    Keywords : leaves; vegetables
    Location : |
    Database : AGRICOLA, QP141 A1J6 CABI, 19811419832

  • Carotenoids and food preparation: the retention of pro-vitamin A caroteinoids in prepared, processed and stored food
    Rodrigez-Amaya DB, 2002

    (No abstract)
    web publication
    Universidade Estadual de Campinas (PhD) | a link to a PhD investigating preservation of vitamin A in food during processing |
    Keywords : vitamin A; food transformation
    Location : http://www.mostproject.org/carrots2.pdf |
    Database :

  • Analysis of nutritional components of eight famine foods of the Republic of Niger.
    Sena, L.P., Vanderjagt, D.J. Rivera, C. Tsin, A.T.C. Muhamadu, I. Mahamadou, O. Millson, M. Pastuszyn, A. Glew, R.H. 1998

    In the western Sahel, indigenous plants become important staples when cereal harvests are inadequate to support populations inhabiting that region of Africa. The purpose of this study was to assess the nutrient content of several of these edible wild plants. The leaves of the following seven plant foods were analyzed: Ziziphus mauritiana, Cerathotheca sesamoides, Moringa oleifera, Leptadenia hastata, Hibiscus sabdarifa, Amaranthus viridi, and Adansonia digitata. The fatty acid, vitamin E, carotenoid, selected mineral and amino acid contents of these plant foods were determined. These same analyses were performed on the fruit of the Adansonia digitata. In quantitative and qualitative terms, Amaranthus viridis was found to be an excellent source of protein. Its amino acid composition compared favorably to that of a World Health Organization (WHO) protein standard. It also contained considerable amounts of the two fatty acids that are essential in humans (linoleic and -linolenic) and a number of minerals including iron, magnesium, calcium and zinc. The leaves of Hibiscus sabdarifa contained an appreciable quantity of protein the composition of which was comparable to the WHO standard. The mineral content of the leaves of this plant was also exceptionally high; noteworthy was its high zinc content. H. sabdarifa also contained significant quantities of the two essential fatty acids. Ziziphus mauritiana was an excellent source of the essential fatty acid linoleic acid and several of the metals including iron, calcium, magnesium and zinc. Its content of other essential nutrients, however, was rather low. In general, Adansonia digitata leaves were nutritionally superior to the fruit of the tree; however, the fruit did contain useful quantities of potassium, phosphorus, zinc and -linolenic acid. The Leptadenia hastata leaves were an especially good source of lutein and -carotene. These data should be useful to the people who inhabit the western Sahel in helping them devise healthy diets during times when cereal staples are in short supply.
    Journal article
    Plant Foods for Human Nutrition, 1998, vol. 52, no. 1, pp. 17-30(14) Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands | Sena L.P.[1]; VanderJagt D.J.[1]; Rivera C.[2]; Tsin A.T.C.[2]; Muhamadu I.[3]; Mahamadou O.[4]; Millson M.[5]; Pastuszyn A.[1]; Glew R.H.[1] [1]Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, NM | 0921-9668
    Keywords : wild foods; leaves; fruits; nutrient content; Famine foods; Carotenoids
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=9839831&dopt=Abstract | Niger
    Database : AGRICOLA, TX341 P53 CABI, 19991400893 Ingenta, Online articles, SICI (online): 0921-96685211730 INIST, 7104 Pubmed, 9839831 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Unconventional leafy vegetables as a source of minerals.
    Shingade, M. Y., Chavan, K. N. 1996

    Studies were undertaken to assess the mineral composition of the leaves and edible stems of 10 species of unconventional leafy vegetables (3 of them woody species) growing naturally in degraded forest areas or on agricultural waste land nearby at Dapoli [in Maharashtra], and compare them with 2 conventional sources (math, Amaranthus tricolor ; and spinach, Spinacia oleracea ). Math, drumstick (Moringa oleifera ), takala (Cassia tora ) and bharangi (Clerodendrum serratum ) contained comparatively high amounts of phosphorus, potassium, calcium and magnesium, and drumstick was rich in sulfur (179.35 mg/100 g). The quantity of micronutrients such as iron and boron was high in math, drumstick and ghol (Portulaca oleracea ). Boron was maximum in drumstick (41.63 ppm). There was not much variation in copper and manganese contents of the species tested, but the zinc content was maximum in unconventional leafy vegetables, namely drumstick, takala, phodsi (Chlorophytum tuberosum ) and dhandgi (Tricholepis amplexicaulus ). The other unconventional species for which data are reported are katemath (Amaranthus spinosus ), cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata ), kawala (Smithia sensitiva ) and kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica ).
    Journal article
    Van Vigyan, 1996, Vol.34, No.1/2, pp.1-6, 10 ref. | Konkan Krishi Vidyapeeth, Dapoli-415 712, India. | 0970-3071
    Keywords : leafy vegetables; non-wood forest products; degraded forests; waste land; nutritive value
    Location : | India; Maharashtra
    Database : CABI, 19970601303

  • Chemical composition of some green leafy vegetables grown in Tanzania.
    Sreeramulu, N., 1982

    Analyses of moisture, ash, protein, fibre, ether extractives and carbohydrate are tabulated for foliage of 22 cultivated and wild vegetable species. Cassia tora, Gynandropsis gynandra, Solanum nigrum and Moringa oleifera contained the highest protein, followed by Basella alba [rubra ], Amaranthus gangeticus [tricolor ] and Celosia argentea. These 7 species had low fibre values; extraction of leaf proteins would be aided by this high protein:fibre ratio. Fibre was highest in Amaranthus viridis (21.3 g/100 g) and lowest in M. oleifera (5.7 g). Most species were good sources of both carbohydrate and protein.
    Journal article
    Journal of Plant Foods, 1982, Vol.4, No.3, pp.139-141, 13 ref. | Dar es Salaam University, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. |
    Keywords : plant composition; Fibre; Carbohydrates; vegetables
    Location : | Tanzania
    Database : CABI, 19840318497

  • Effect of cooking on the nutritive value of common food plants of Tanzania. 1. Vitamin C in some of the wild green leafy vegetables.
    Sreeramulu, N., Ndossi, G. D. Mtotomwema, K. 1983

    1. Wild leafy green vegetables, 16 species, contained vitamin C 2-204 mg/100 g, with Moringa oleifera the richest source. After boiling with excess or little water 0 to 99, mean 71 and 0 to 97, mean 55%, respectively, of vitamin was lost.
    Journal article
    Food Chemistry, 1983, Vol.10, No.3, pp.205-210, 13 ref. | Dep. Botany, Univ. Dar es Salaam, PO Box 35060, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. | 0308-8146
    Keywords : ascorbic acid; vegetables; cooking; wild plants; plant composition
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19831446616

  • Retention and storage stability of beta-carotene in deshydrated drumstick leaves (Moringa oleifera)
    Subadra, S., Monica, J. Dhabhai, D. 1997

    Drumstick leaves (Moringa oleifera) procured from home gardens were shade dried after steam blanching or after steam blanching followed by sulphiting in 0.2% potassium metabisulphite solution and were stored in polythene containers having double lids for three months. The samples were analyzed for total carotene, beta-carotene and ascorbic acid in the fresh form, immediately after drying and on 30, 60 and 90 days of storage. Analysis of fresh leaves revealed that they contained 27.1 mg of total carotene, 17.4 mg of beta-carotene, and 143.6 mg of ascorbic acid per 100 g. Sulphiting in addition to blanching was more effective in the retention of beta-carotene immediately after dehydration (72% vs. 59%) and at the end of one month of storage (64% vs. 51%) but not at the end of 90 days of storage (53% vs. 47%). The shade-dried drumstick leaves when rehydrated and incorporated into recipes suffered further losses of beta-carotene, which were smaller in recipes that involved steaming and shallow frying (27% and 31%) but greater in recipes that involved repeated boiling and stirring (65%). All recipes were rated as highly acceptable and two of them per one serving provided the full RDA for pre-school children. Thus dehydrated drumstick leaves have the potential to serve as a valuable source of beta-carotene in the diets of the population in India and other developing countries.
    Journal article
    International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition 48(6): 373-379. | Department of Foods and Nutrition, MS University of Baroda, Baroda 390 002, India. | 0963-7486
    Keywords : cooking; storage; leaves; processing; blanching; dehydration
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, 19981402077 INIST, 18249F

  • Analysis of carotenoids in vegetables by HPLC.
    Tee, E. S., Lim, C. L. 1992

    A combination of HPLC, open-column chromatography and UV-VIS spectrophotometry was used to analyse saponified and non-saponified extracts of the edible parts of 4 green leafy vegetables (drumstick leaves [Moringa oleifera ], Sauropus androgynus, spinach and wolfberry leaves [Lycium sp.]), 2 vegetable legumes (French bean [Phaseolus vulgaris ] and long bean [Vigna unguiculata subsp. sesquipedalis ]), tomatoes and carrots. Carotenoid peaks were identified using 7 reference standards. In tomato and carrot, the HPLC profile was similar for the saponified and non-saponified extracts, but for all the other vegetables, the non-saponified extract profiles had extra peaks probably corresponding to non-carotenoid pigments. A peak with a retention period of 10.5 min, corresponding to that of the -carotene standard was found in all the vegetables. A peak at 10.0 min (-carotene) was found in carrot only and a peak at 7.4 min (lycopene) was found in tomato only. A peak at 3.7 min (probably lutein) was found in the leafy vegetables, the legumes and tomato. Saponification caused some loss of lutein (the maximum loss was 43% in M. oleifera ) but had little effect on -carotene and -carotene concentrations. The total carotenoid content could be calculated from the absorbance reading of the saponified extracts at 450 nm, except for tomato, which had a maximum absorption at 470 nm.
    Journal article
    ASEAN Food Journal, 1992, Vol.7, No.2, pp.91-99, 16 ref. | Division of Human Nutrition, Institute for Medical Research, 50588 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. | 1505-5337
    Keywords : Nutritive value; leaves; pods; fruits; roots; Carotenoids
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19930323166

  • Aliments de l'Ouest Africain : Tables de composition
    Toury, J., Giorgi, R. Favier, Jean-Claude Savina, J.F. 1967

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Annales de la Nutrition et de l'Alimentation (FRA), 1967, Vol. 21, No 2, p. 73-127, bibl., tabl. | |
    Keywords : tropical food plant; composition table; vernacular name; inventory; taxonomy; nutritional value
    Location : | Camerron; Occidental Africa
    Database : Horizon, F B20453/2; B PB 117/1; M B20453/1

  • A test of Social Marketing to Increase the dietary use of Vitamin A-Rich Drumstick leaves by rural people in Orissa, India
    Trees for Life, 1997

    (No abstract)
    Report
    Trees for Life report 3006 W.St. Louis, Wichita, KS 67203-5129, USA Tel : (1) 316 945 69 29 info@treesforlife.org | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • One year Post-Campaign Survey Report for A test of Social Marketing to Increase the dietary use of Vitamin A-Rich Drumstick leaves by rural people in Orissa, India
    Trees for Life, 1997

    (No abstract)
    Report
    Trees for Life report 3006 W.St. Louis, Wichita, KS 67203-5129, USA Tel : (1) 316 945 69 29 info@treesforlife.org | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Nutritional value of Moringa.
    Verma, S.C., Banerji, R. Misra, G. Nigam, S.K. 1976

    Moringa or drumstick, Moringa concanensis, contained in seed more protein and fat, rich in oleic acid, than M. oleifera. Seed fat was 33 and 27%, and protein in detoxified seed meal 72.6 and 50%, respectively. Leaves contained 55 to 59, 79 to 134, tender pods 76 to 107, 76 to 132 and mature pods 103 to 130, 93 to 144 mg vitamin C/100 g, respectively, for 2 and 11 clones.
    Journal article
    Current Science, 1976, Vol.45, No.21, pp.769-770, 3 ref. | National Botanic Gardens, (CSIR), Lucknow 226 001, India. | 0011-3891
    Keywords : ascorbic acid; plant; composition; seeds; fatty oil plants; vegetables
    Location : | India
    Database : AGRICOLA, 475 SCI23 CABI, 19771455458

  • Home gardening for combating vitamin A deficiency in rural India.
    Vijayaraghavan, K., Nayak, M. U. Bamji, M. S. Ramana, G. N. V. Vinodini Reddy 1997

    A three-year study [date not given] was carried out in 20 villages, affecting 3585 households, across 2 agroclimatic regions Andhra Pradesh, India, to assess the possibility that home gardening could increase the availability of -carotene-rich foods, increase consumption of these foods by pre-school children and therefore decrease the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency. After a baseline survey, seeds and seedlings of carotene-rich foods were distributed by trained village assistants to households with pre-school children. Multimedia nutrition education was provided by village assistants and district-level supervisors. An evaluation at the end of 3 years revealed that there was a more than 6-fold increase in the percentage of households with home gardens. 85% of these households were growing seasonal greens such as amaranth and spinach, in addition to perennials such as drumstick (Moringa oleifera ), papaya and bachali (Basella alba ). The frequency of consumption of carotene-rich foods (more than once a week) increased by about 50% over that observed at baseline. About 50% of the households with surviving drumstick plants were consuming their leaves, compared with none at baseline. The prevalence of Bitot's spots [foamy deposits on the conjunctiva associated with vitamin A deficiency] showed a declining trend, with increasing duration of participation. It is concluded that the home gardening approach is feasible and may be a recommended long-term strategy to combat vitamin A deficiency in rural India.
    Journal article
    Food and Nutrition Bulletin, 1997, Vol.18, No.4, pp.337-343, 21 ref. | Division of Field Studies in the National Institute of Nutrition in Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India. | 0379-5721
    Keywords : vitamin A deficiency; retinol; home gardens; nutrition education; disease prevention
    Location : | India; Andhra Pradesh
    Database : CABI, 19981414150

  • Engineering solutions to Malnutrition
    X, 2002

    (No abstract)
    web publication
    GRAIN | an interesting overview of malnutrition, viamin A deficiency and solutions |
    Keywords :
    Location : http://216.15.202.3/publications/mar002-en.cfm |
    Database :

oil

  • Physio-chemical analysis of seven seed oils.
    Ahmad, M. B., Rauf, A. Osman, S. M. 1989

    Seeds (obtained from a local market and a nursery in Dehra Dun) of Butea frondosa [B. monosperma ], Cassia absus, Moringa pterygosperma [M. oleifera ], Vitex negundo, Cannabis sativa, Punica granatum and Lawsonia alba [L. inermis ] contained on av. 18.6, 4.5, 18.9, 4.7, 17.2, 4.9 and 5.8% oil, respectively. Data on the fatty acid composition of oils are given.
    Journal article
    Journal of the Oil Technologists' Association of India, 1989, Vol.21, No.3, pp.46-47, 5 ref. | Department of Chemistry, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202001, Uttar Pradesh, India. | 0970-4094
    Keywords : seeds; Pomegranates; biochemistry; Plant composition; fatty oil plants
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19900739081

  • Comparison of physical, chemical, and functional properties of Moringa peregrina (Al-Yassar or Al-Ban) and soybean proteins.
    Al-Kahtani, H.A., Abou-Arab, A.A. 1993

    The young seeds of M. peregrina are eaten like peas and the mature seeds are fried or roasted like groundnuts. Flours of M. peregrina and soyabeans were individually defatted and fractionated into protein concentrate and protein isolate. M. peregrina flour contained more oil than soyabean flour but was lower in proteins, carbohydrates and ash. M. peregrina protein concentrate also contained less protein and more carbohydrate. The protein isolate of M. peregrina had higher protein and lower carbohydrate levels than the protein isolate of soyabeans. Potassium and sodium were the predominant minerals in both M. peregrina and soyabean flour. X-ray diffraction patterns (d spacings and 2 angle of crystallinity) could easily discriminate M. peregrina products from soyabean products. M. peregrina flour and concentrate were significantly lower in bulk density than the soyabean fractions. PAGE indicated 9 and 5 subunits (defatted flour), 13 and 9 subunits (protein concentrate), and 12 and 5 subunits (protein isolate) for soyabeans and M. peregrina proteins, respectively. M. peregrina proteins were somewhat less soluble than soyabean proteins, even at higher pH values. Emulsion capacity of M. peregrina products was generally higher than that of soyabean products at all pH values, while emulsion stability of soyabean products was generally higher, particularly at pH 2 and 10. Maximum increase in foam volume was observed at pH 2. At pH 4-6, the foam stability of M. peregrina protein isolate was greater, but the foam stability of its protein concentrate was lower than that of soyabean proteins. Soyabean protein concentrate absorbed significantly more water, while M. peregrina products absorbed more oil.
    Journal article
    Cereal chemistry.Nov/Dec 1993. v. 70 (6) p. 619-626. | Food Science Department, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. | 0009-0352
    Keywords : flowers; protein concentrates; mineral content
    Location : |
    Database : AGRICOLA, 59.8 C33 CABI, 19940704883 INIST, 708

  • Plasma lipid profiles of rats fed seed oils of moringa peregrina and salicornia
    Al-Othman, A. A., Al-Kahtani, H. A. Hewedy, F. M. Al-Khalifa, A. S. 1998

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Journal of applied nutrition. 1998 , vol. 50 , no 1-2 , pp. 3 - 11 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : INIST, 16557

  • The nature and commercial uses of Ben oil
    Anon, 1904

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Supplement to the Board of trade Journal Bulletin of the Imperial Institute pp.117-120 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Food security in the village: the case of oilseed processing
    Dietz, M., Metzler, R. Zarate, C. 1994

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Appropriate Technology, 20 (4) pp.9-11 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Nutritive significance of oil extracted from Moringa oleifera seeds
    Dahot, M.U., Memon, A.R. 1985

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Journal Of Pharmacy University Of Karachi 3(2): 75-80. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Benseeds: a potential oil source.
    Ibrahim, S. S., Ismail, M. Samuel, G. Kamel, E. Azhari, T., El 1974

    Details are given of the properties of ben oil, obtained from the seeds of Moringa oleifera and M. aptera, which have an oil content of about 47%.
    Journal article
    Agricultural Research Review, 1974, Vol.52, No.9, pp.47-50, 7 ref. | Horticultural Research Institute, Agricultural Research Centre, Egypt. | 0374-5252
    Keywords : seeds; oils; fatty oil plants
    Location : | Egypt
    Database : CABI, 19760339221

  • Beauty secrets of Ancieent Egypt
    ILLES, Judith, 2002

    (No abstract)
    web publication
    Tour Egypt Monthly | an interesting story about the use of Moringa oil in Ancient Egypt |
    Keywords : cosmetic; oil; beauty; history
    Location : http://www.egyptmonth.com/mag08012000/mag4.htm |
    Database :

  • Curiosidades: cosmeticos
    Sierra Valent?, Xavier, 2002

    (No abstract)
    web publication
    Seshat | an article about cosmetics in ancient Egypt (in Spanish) |
    Keywords : cosmetic; oil; beauty
    Location : http://www.egiptologia.net/seshat/cur-12.html |
    Database :

  • Huiles a interet pharmacologique, cosmetologique et dietetique. IV. Huiles de Moringa oleifera Lamk. et de M. drouhardii Jumelle. Oils with a pharmacological, cosmetic and dietetic importance. IV. Oils of Moringa oleifera Lamk. and Moringa drouhardii Jum
    Delaveau, P., Boiteau, P. 1980

    Both oils were stable and resistant to oxidation. Oil of M. oleifera appears suitable for pharmaceutical and cosmetological uses but yields are low owing to the small size of the seeds and the limited number of fruits produced per tree. M. drouhardii grows in arid regions of Madagascar and has larger fruits and seeds than M. oleifera. Its oil production could be increased and its high oil protein content (25% by weight of kernel) should make the residue satisfactory as an oil-cake. Data on the composition of the oils are tabulated.
    Journal article
    Plantes Medicinales et Phytotherapie, 1980, Vol.14, No.1, pp.29-33, 28 ref. | Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, 4, avenue de l'Observatoire, 75006, Paris, France. | 0032-0994
    Keywords : proteins; oils; seeds; composition; fatty oil plants; ornamental woody plants
    Location : | West Africa; Madagascar
    Database : AGRICOLA, QK99 A1P5 CABI, 19800388386

  • Acidos gordos em oleo de moringuerio (Moringa oleifera Lam.)
    Ferrao, A.M.B., Ferrao, J.E.M. 1970

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Agronomia Angolana (Luanda) 8, pp.3-16 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Moringa oil
    Folkard GF, Sutherland JS 1996

    (No abstract)
    web publication
    Footsteps 28 (sept 1996) | |
    Keywords :
    Location : http://www.lboro.ac.uk/well/resources/technical-briefs/60-water-clarification-using-moringa-oleifera-seeds.pdf |
    Database :

  • Design for a moringa seed oil press
    Fuglie, L., 2001

    (No abstract)
    Article in Book
    in Fuglie L. (ed), The Miracle Tree: The multiple attributes of Moringa. CTA, Wageningen / CWS, Dakar. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Moringa seed oil: Quality and yields
    Fuglie, L., 2001

    (No abstract)
    Article in Book
    in Fuglie L. (ed), The Miracle Tree: The multiple attributes of Moringa. CTA, Wageningen / CWS, Dakar. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Etude des problemes des oleagineux
    Gillier, P., Mahdavi, G. 1977

    (No abstract)
    Report
    Paris (France) : Ministere de la Cooperation, 1977/07. - 100 p. : r?f., cart.: *, tabl. | Ministere de la Cooperation. Paris. France; IRHO. Institut de Recherche pour les Huiles et Oleagineux. Paris. France |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : SESAME, 39242-BDPA (IBISCUS - FRANCE)

  • Organic Residues in Egyptian Amphorae
    Heron C, 2002

    (No abstract)
    web publication
    University of Bradford | an investigation about organic residues in ancient Egyptian Amphorae |
    Keywords : cosmetic; oil
    Location : http://www.brad.ac.uk/acad/archsci/depart/resgrp/molarch/egypt.html | Egypt
    Database :

  • Ben (Moringa) seed oil
    Jamieson, G.S., 1939

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Oil and Soap, 16 pp.173-174 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Variability of degree of high order compositeness in fats from the same biological species: fats from geographic varieties of Pongamia glabra, Nerium thevetifolium and Moringa pterygosperma.
    Kartha, A.R.S., Upadhyay, G.S. 1969

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Oils Oilseeds, July 1969, 22 (1) p. 7-12. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : AGRICOLA, 307.8 OI54

  • Chemical composition of oil from Moringa oleifera
    Khan, F. W., Gul, P. Malik, M. N. 1975

    The yield of oil from seeds of M. oleifera was 21%; the physico-chemical characteristics of the oil compared well with those of oils from other Moringa spp.
    Journal article
    Pakistan Journal of Forestry, 1975, Vol.25, No.2, pp.100-102, 9 ref. | | 0030-9818
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19760631782

  • Characterization of Moringa oleifera Seed Oil Variety "Periyakulam 1"
    Lalas, S., Tsaknis, J. 2002

    The oil from Moringa oleifera seeds variety Periyakulam 1 (PKM 1) from India was extracted using three different procedures including cold press (CP), extraction with n-hexane (H) and extraction with a mixture of chloroform:methanol (1:1) (CM). The oils were compared with those of a commercial virgin olive oil and Moringa oleiferavar. Mbololo seed oil. The oil concentration ranged from 25.1% (CP) to 41.4% (CM). The density, refractive index, colour, smoke point, viscosity, acidity, saponification value, iodine value, fatty acid methyl esters, sterols, tocopherols (by HPLC), peroxide value, E1%1 cm at 232 nm and the susceptibility to oxidation measured by the Rancimat method were determined. The oil was found to contain high levels of unsaturated fatty acids, especially oleic (up to 71.60%). The dominant saturated acids were palmitic and behenic (both up to 6.4%). The oil was also found to contain high levels of -sitosterol (up to 45.58%), stigmasterol (up to 23.10%) and campesterol (up to 15.81%). -, - and -tocopherols were detected up to levels of 15.38, 25.40 and 15.51 mg/kg of oil, respectively. Moringa oleifera seed oil showed a long induction period (at 120?C), which however was reduced from 42.56 to 72.56% after degumming. The Moringa oleifera seed oil showed high stability to oxidative rancidity. Among the methods used for extraction, the mixture of chloroform:methanol (1:1) (CM) showed the higher resistance to oxidation.
    Journal article
    Journal of Food Composition and Analysis, 2002, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 65-78 ACADEMIC PRESS | Department of Food Technology, Technological Educational Institute (T.E.I.) of Athens, Ag. Spyridonos str., Egaleo, Athens, 12210, Greece | 0889-1575
    Keywords : behenic acid; gamma-tocopherol
    Location : | India
    Database : CABI, BA: 20023046459 Ingenta, Uncover plus, Online articles

  • Behen oil : A classic oil for modern cosmetic
    LE POOLE H.A.C., 1996

    L'huile de Behen est d?riv?e des graines de l'arbre 'moringa'. Elle poss?de une stabilit? excellente et des propri?t?s parfum-fixateur. De nouvelles sources signifient un avenir favorable pour cet ingr?dient
    Journal article
    Cosmetics and Toiletries 1996 , vol. 111 , no 1 , pp. 77 - 80 | JAN DEKKER INTERNATIONAL |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : INIST, 6219

  • Isolation and spectroscopic studies of mono-palmitic di-oleic triglyceride from seeds of Moringa oleifera Lam.
    Memon, G. M., Khatri, L. M. 1987

    Mono-palmitic di-oleic triglyceride was isolated from the benzene extract of semi-dried seeds. Its tentative structure was elucidated from spectral data.
    Journal article
    Pakistan Journal of Scientific and Industrial Research, 1987, Vol.30, No.5, pp.393-395, 7 ref. | PCSIR Lab., Karachi 39, Pakistan. | 0030-9885
    Keywords : seeds; composition; acyglycerols; characterization; lipids; oilseed plants
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19880352558

  • Effects of Oil Extraction from Moringa oleifera Seeds on Coagulation of Turbid Water.
    Muyibi, S. A., Noor, M. J. M. M. Leong, T. K. Loon, L. H. 2002

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    International Journal of Environmental Studies, 2002, vol. 59, no. 2, pp. 243-254 GORDON & BREACH / HARWOOD ACADEMIC PUBLISHING | |
    Keywords : hardness removal; softening; adsorption; synthetic water; surface water; groundwater
    Location : |
    Database : Ingenta, Uncover plus

  • (13)C NMR characterization of triacylglycerols of Moringa oleifera seed oil: an "oleic-vaccenic acid" oil.
    Vlahov G,, Chepkwony PK, Ndalut PK 2002

    The composition of acyl chains and their positions in the triacylglycerols of the oil extracted from seeds of Moringa oleifera were studied by C NMR spectroscopy. The unsaturated chains of M. oleifera seed oil were found to comprise only mono-unsaturated fatty acids and, in particular, two -9 mono-unsaturated acids, (cis-9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) and cis-11-eicosenoic acids) and one -7 mono-unsaturated acid (cis-11-octadecenoic acid (vaccenic acid)). The mono-unsaturated fatty acids were detected as separated resonances in the spectral regions where the carbonyl and olefinic carbons resonate according to the 1,3- and 2-positions on the glycerol backbone. The unambiguous detection of vaccenic acid was also achieved through the resonance of the -3 carbon. The C NMR methodology enabled the simultaneous detection of oleate, vaccenate, and eicosenoate chains according to their positions on the glycerol backbone (1,3- and 2-positions) through the carboxyl, olefinic, and methylene envelope carbons of the triacylglycerol acyl chains.
    Journal article
    Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 2002, vol. 50, no. 5, pp. 970-975 ACS AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY | Istituto Sperimentale per la Elaiotecnica, Contrada Fonte Umano, 65013 Citta S. Angelo (Pescara), Italy, and Department of Chemistry, Moi University, P.O. Box 1125, Eldoret, Kenya. |
    Keywords :
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11853466&dopt=Abstract |
    Database : Ingenta, Uncover plus INIST, 7332 Pubmed, 11853466 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Investigation on some physico-chemical antioxidant and toxicological properties of Moringa oleifera seed oil
    Njoku, O. U., Umale Adikwu, M. 1997

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Acta pharmaceutica : (Zagreb). [ Acta pharm. : (Zagreb). ] 1997 , vol. 47 , no 4 , pp. 287 - 290 | Lipid and Lipoprotein Research Unit, Department of Chemistry, University of Nigeria |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : INIST, 7013

  • Physico-chemical properties of the seeds fat of the Moringaceae
    Patel, K.C., et al. 1958

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Indian J. Appl. Chem. 21:85-86 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Studies on moringa (Moringa pterigosperma Gaertn) oil and water coagulation by press cake.
    Sakthivel, T., Thamburaj, S. 2000

    The oil content of M. pterigosperma leaves, flowers, seeds and kernels, and water coagulation time and quality as influenced by the plant's oil press cake were studied in a field experiment conducted in Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India [date not given]. The highest oil content were recorded from kernels (39.5%), followed by seeds (21.4%), and the lowest were recorded from both the leaves and flowers. As the concentration of oil cake for water purification increased, the time taken for water coagulation decreased. The optimum dose of press cake used for water purification was 0.050 g. The pH of the water was lower in treated water, whereas sulfate, bicarbonate, calcium and magnesium content increased in the press cake-treated compared to the untreated water.
    Journal article
    Vegetable Science, 2000, Vol.27, No.2, pp.205-207, 3 ref. Indian Society of Vegetable Science, Varanasi, India | Horticultural College and Research Institute, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore-641 003, Tamil Nadu, India. |
    Keywords : bicarbonate water; chemical composition; coagulation; oilseed cakes; seeds; water purification
    Location : | India; Tamil Nadu
    Database : CABI, 20013101777

  • Studies on the seed fat composition of Moringaceae family.
    Sengupta, A., Gupta, M.P. 1970

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Fette Seifen Anstrichmittel, Jan 1970, 72 (1) p. 6-10. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : AGRICOLA, 384 C422

  • The triglyceride composition of Moringa concanensis seed fat.
    Sengupta, A., Sengupta, C. Das, P.K. 1971

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    LipidsSept 1971, 6 (9) p. 666-669. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : AGRICOLA, QP751 L5

  • Chemical composition and characteristics of Moringa peregrina seeds and seeds oil.
    Somali, M.A., Bajneid, M.A. Al-Fhaimani, S.S. 1984

    Abstract: Seeds and seed oil from a tree (Moringa peregrina, commonly called "Yassar") used in Saudi Arabia were analyzed for chemical composition, macro-nutrients, and fatty acid composition. The seeds were found to contain 22.1% protein, 15.3% carbohydrate, 54.3% oil, 3.6% fiber, and 2.5% ash. Analysis of the seed oil fatty acids by gas-liquid chromatography revealed a composition of: 78.0, 9.3, 3.5, 2.6, 2.4, 1.8, 1.6, and 0.6% of oleic, palmitic, stearic, behenic, palmitoleic, arachidic, linolenic, and linoleic acids, respectively (representing polyunsaturated and saturated fatty acid contents of 84.7 and 14.7% respectively). (wz)
    Journal article
    Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society, 1984, Vol.61, No.1, pp.85-86, 7 ref. | Quality Control Lab., Min. of Commerce, Halat Ammar (Tabuk), Saudi Arabia. | 0003-021X
    Keywords : plant oils; nutrient content; fatty acids; polyunsaturated fats; nutritional value; food analysis
    Location : | Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
    Database : AGRICOLA, 307.8 J82 CABI, 19840322857

  • Decentralised edible oil milling in Zimbabwe: an evaluation report of the Tinytech oil mill project
    Sunga, I., Whitby, G. 1995

    (No abstract)
    Report
    Progress report for Intermediate Technology Development Group Rugby, UK | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Stability During Frying of Moringa oleifera Seed Oil Variety "Periyakulam 1"
    Tsaknis, J, Lalas, S. 2002

    The frying performance of the Moringa oleifera seed oil variety Periyakulam 1 (PKM 1) from India, extracted using cold press (CP) and n -hexane (H), during frying of potatoes and cod was studied especially as regards repeated frying operations. The oils were used for intermittent frying of potato slices and cod filets at a temperature of 175?5?C for 5 consecutive days. The chemical changes occurring in the oils were evaluated. Free fatty acid content, peroxide value, specific extinction at 232 nm, polar compounds colour and viscosity of the oils all increased, whereas the iodine values, smoke points, polyunsaturated fatty acid content, induction period and tocopherol concentration decreased. The effect of the oils on the organoleptic quality of these fried foods was also determined by expert panellists. The analytical and sensory data showed that the lowest deterioration occurred in cold pressure produced oil and the highest in n -hexane extracted oil. Therefore, cold pressure oil appears to be the most appropriate for frying. Potatoes and cod were also fried in virgin olive oil in order to have a direct comparison between the different oils. The results clearly indicated that virgin olive oil has the highest resistance to thermal deterioration during frying compared with the other two oils.
    Journal article
    Journal of Food Composition and Analysis, 2002, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 79-102 ACADEMIC PRESS | Department of Food Technology, Technological Educational Institute (T.E.I.) of Athens, Ag. Spyridonos str., Egaleo, Athens, 12210, Greece | 0889-1575
    Keywords : PKM 1; deep-frying; frying stability; potatoes; cod
    Location : |
    Database : Ingenta, Uncover plus, Online articles, SICI (online): 0889-157515179101

  • Quality changes of Moringa oleifera variety of Blantyre, seed oil during frying.
    Tsaknis, J., Lalas, S. Gergis, V. Dourtoglou, V. Spiliotis, V. 1998

    M. oleifera seed oils from Blantyre, Malawi, were used for intermittent frying of potato slices and cod filets at 175 plus or minus 5 deg C for 5 consecutive days. The chemical changes occurring in the oils were evaluated. Free fatty acid content, peroxide value, specific extinction at 232 nm, polar compounds colour and viscosity of the oils all increased, whereas the iodine values, smoke points, PUFA content, induction period and tocopherol concentration decreased. The effect of the oils on the organoleptic quality of these fried foods was also determined. The analytical and sensory data showed that the lowest deterioration occurred in the oil produced by cold pressure and the highest in the oil extracted by n-hexane.
    Journal article
    Rivista Italiana delle Sostanze Grasse, 1998, Vol.75, No.4, pp.181-190, 26 ref. | Dept of Food Technology - Technological Educational Institute (T.E.I.), Athens, Greece. |
    Keywords : quality; frying; seed oils; composition; extraction
    Location : | Malawi
    Database : CABI, 19981411902

  • Characterization of Moringa oleifera variety Mbololo seed oil of Kenya.
    Tsaknis, J., Lalas, S. Gergis, V. Dourtoglou, V. Spiliotis, V. 1999

    The oil from Moringa oleifera variety Mbololo seeds from Kenya was extracted using three different procedures including cold press (CP), extraction with n-hexane (H), and extraction with a mixture of chloroform/methanol (50:50) (CM). The oil concentration ranged from 25.8% (CP) to 31.2% (CM). The density, refractive index, color, smoke point, viscosity, acidity, saponification value, iodine value, fatty acid methyl esters, sterols, tocopherols (by HPLC), peroxide value, and E1cm(1%) at 232 and 270 nm and the susceptibility to oxidation measured with the Rancimat method were determined. The oil was found to contain high levels of unsaturated fatty acids, especially oleic (up to 75.39%). The dominant saturated acids were behenic (up to 6.73%) and palmitic (up to 6.04%). The oil was also found to contain high levels of beta-sitosterol (up to 50.07%), stigmasterol (up to 17.27%), and campesterol (up to 15.13%). alpha-, gamma-, and delta-tocopherols were detected up to levels of 105.0, 39.54, and 77.60 mg/kg of oil, respectively. The induction period (at 120 degrees C) of M. oleifera seed oil was reduced from 44.6 to 64.3% after degumming. The M. oleifera seed oil showed high stability to oxidative rancidity. The results of all the above determinations were compared with those of a commercial virgin olive oil.
    Journal article
    Journal of agricultural and food chemistry.Nov 1999. v. 47 (11) p. 4495-4499. | Department of Food Technology, Technological Educational Institute (TEI), Ag. Spyridonos Str., Egaleo 12210, Athens, Greece. jtsaknis@teiath.gr | 0021-8561
    Keywords : seed oils; unsaturated fatty acids; chemical composition; saponification number; iodine value; tocop
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10552840&dopt=Abstract | Kenya
    Database : AGRICOLA, 381 J8223 CABI, 20000305953 INIST, 7332 Pubmed, 10552840 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Quality changes of Moringa oleifera, variety Mbololo of Kenya, seed oil during frying
    Tsaknis, J., Spiliotis, V. Lalas, S. Gergis, V. Dourtoglou, V. 1999

    The frying performance of Moringa oleifera variety Mbololo of Kenya seed oil (produced by cold pressure, extraction with n-hexane and a mixture of chloroform-methanol) was studied especially as regards repeated frying operations. The oils were used for intermittent frying of potato slices and cod filets at a temperature of 175 ? 5?C for 5 consecutive days. Under such conditions thermal and oxidative decomposition of the oils takes place. The chemical changes occurring in the oils were evaluated. Free fatty acid content, peroxide value, specific extinction at 232 nm, polar compounds, colour and viscosity of the oils all increased, whereas the iodine values, smoke points, polyunsaturated fatty acid content, induction period and tocopherol concentration decreased. The effect of the oils on the organoleptic quality of these fried foods was also determined The analytical and sensory data showed that the lowest deterioration occurred in cold pressure produced oil and the highest in n-hexane extracted oil.
    Journal article
    Grasas y aceites : (Sevilla). 1999 , vol. 50 , no 1 , pp. 37 - 48 | Department of Food Technology, Technological Educational Institute (T.E.I.), Ag. Spyridonos str. |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : INIST, 1755

  • A total characterisation of Moringa oleifera Malawi seed oil
    Tsaknis, J., Lalas, S. Gergis, V. Spiliotis, V. 1998

    The oil from the seeds of Moringa oleifera Malawi was produced using three different ways. Cold pressure (CP), extraction with n-hexane (H) and extraction with a mixture of chloroform:methanol (50:50) (CM). The oil produced ranged from 25.1 (CP) to 41.4% (CM). The density, refractive index, colour, smoke point, viscosity, acidity, saponification value, iodine value, fatty acid methyl esters, sterols, tocopherols (by HPLC), peroxide value, E at 232 nm and 270 nm and the susceptibility to oxidation measured by the Rancimat method were determined. The oil was found to contain high levels of unsaturated fatty acids, especially oleic (up to 67.80%), The dominant saturated acid was behenic (up to 6.81%) and stearic (up to 5.86%). The oil was also found to contain high levels of -sitosterol (up to 47.10%), campesterol (up to 23.83%) and stigmasterol (up to 17.40%). - - and -tocopherols were detected up to levels of 226.9, 71.47 and 216.57 mglkg respectively. The induction period (at 120?C) of Moringa oleifera seed oil was reduced from 49% to 74% after degumming. Moringa oil showed high stability to oxidative rancidity. Compared to olive oil, Moringa oleifera seed oil showed higher stability, lower degree of unsaturation and similar fatty acid composition (apart from C18:2 and C18:3).
    Journal article
    Rivista Italiana delle Sostanze Grasse. [ Riv. Ital. Sostanze Grasse. ] 1998 , vol. 75 , no 1 , pp. 21 - 27 | Department of Food Technology, Technological Educational Institute (T.E.I.), Athens, Greece. |
    Keywords : seeds; fatty acids; esters; sterols; tocopherols; physicochemical properties
    Location : | Greece
    Database : CABI, 19981408591 INIST, 4193

  • Characterization of Moringa peregrina Arabia seed oil.
    Tsaknis, J., 1998

    El contenido de aceite de semilla Moringa peregrina (de Arabia Saudi) fue del 49,8 por ciento. Los resultados de algunas caracteristicas fisicas y quimicas del aceite extraido fueron: indice de refraccion (40 grados C) 1.460, densidad (24 grados C) 0.906, acidez (como oleico) 0,30 por ciento, indice de yodo 69,6, indice de saponificacion 185 e indice de peroxido 0,4 Meq/Kg. El aceite de semilla Moringa peregrina tuvo altos niveles de oleico (70,52 por ciento) seguido por el gadoleico (1,5 por ciento), mientras los acidos saturados dominantes fueron palmitico (8,9 por ciento) y estearico (3,82 por ciento). Los alfa, gamma y delta-tocoferoles fueron detectados a niveles de 145,58 y 66 mg/kg respectivamente. El periodo de induccion (a 120 grados C) de aceite de semilla de tomate fue de 10,2 horas y se redujo a 8,1 horas despues del desgomado. Las extinciones especificas a 232 y 270 nm fueron 1,66 y 0,19 respectivamente. El beta-sitosterol fue el componente mas predominante de la fraccion Oil content of Moringa peregrina seeds (from Saudi Arabia) was 49.8%. Results of some physical and chemical characteristics of extracted oil were: refractive index (40 ?C) 1.460, density (24 ?C) 0.906, acidity (as oleic) 0.30%, iodine value 69.6, saponification number 185 and peroxide value 0.4 meq kg. Moringa peregrina seed oil was found to contain high levels of oleic (70.52%), followed by gadoleic (1.5%), while the dominant saturated acids were palmitic (8.9%) and stearic (3.82%). - - and -tocopherols were detected at levels of 145, 58 and 66 mg kg respectively. The induction period (at 120?C) of tomato seed oil was 10.2 hours and reduced to 8.1 hours after degumming. Specific extinctions at 232 and 270 nm were 1.66 and 0.19 respectively. -sitosterol was found as the most predominant component of the sterolic fraction of the oil. Other sterols found in percentages higher than 1.5% were 24-methylene-cholesterol, campesterol, stigmasterol and -avenasterol. In addition, trace to minor amounts of brassicasterol, campestanol, -campestanol, clerosterol, -stigmastadienol, -stigmastanol and -avenasterol were found.
    Journal article
    Grasas y Aceites (Espana). (Mar-Abr 1998). t. 49(2) p. 170-176. Recibido en el Centro de Entrada de Datos en Oct de 1998. | Department of Food Technology, Tecnological Educational Institute (T.E.I.) of Athens, Ag. Spyridonos str., Egaleo | ISSN 0017-3495.
    Keywords : plant oils; chemicophysical properties; saturated fatty acids; tocopherols; proximate composition
    Location : |
    Database : AGRIS, 1998-120573 INIST, 1755

  • Note on the comparative development of fatty acids in ripening seeds of 16 dicot species producing C16-C18 acid fats.
    Upadhya, G. S., Narayanaswamy, G. Kartha, A. R. S. 1974

    Data are tabulated on relative changes in the proportions of saturated, mono- and di-unsaturated acids in the biogenesis of fats in 16 species including Cassia occidentalis, Achras sapota, Anacardium occidentale, Terminalia catappa, Moringa pterygosperma, Pongamia glabra, Tabernaemontana crispa, Azadirachta indica, Mangifera indica, Abelmoschus esculentus, Nerium indicum, Melia azedarach, Jatropha curcas and J. glandulifera.
    Journal article
    Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences, 1974, Vol.44, No.9, pp.620-622, 7 ref. | Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi, India. | 0019-5022
    Keywords : metabolism; seeds; horticultural crops; plant composition; fatty oil plants
    Location : | Delhi; India
    Database : CABI, 19770353624

  • The ancient of oils Moringa oil offers a variety of applications for the C&T industry
    Wilmington Publishing LTD (Pub), 2001

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Soap Perfumery and Cosmetics, 2001, vol. 74, no. 5, pp. 48-52 WILMINGTON PUBLISHING LTD | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : Ingenta, Uncover plus

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recipes


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seed


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Water treatment

  • Sludge conditioning with Moringa seed.
    Adelmuyi, J.O., 1988

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Environment International 14(1): 59-64. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Moringa oleifera. L'arbre purificateur.
    Agbenoko, L., 1991

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Le Flamboyant 1991 n?17-18 : 34-35 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : SILVA - 6 Avenue de Saint Mand? - 75012 PARIS - Tel : 33 1 43 40 11 25 - silva@cirad.fr code : CR1718/34 |
    Database :

  • Toxicological assessment of seeds from Moringa oleifera and Moringa stenopetala, two highly efficient primary coagulants for domestic water treatment of tropical raw waters
    Berger MR, Habs M Jahn SA Schmahl D. 1984

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    East African Medical Journal, Sep; 61 (9): 712-716. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=6535725&dopt=Abstract |
    Database : Pubmed, 6535725 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • A preliminary evaluation of turbidity removal by natural coagulants indigenous to Venezuela
    Diaz A., Rincon N. Escorihuela A. Fernandez N. Chacin E. Forster C.F. 1999

    The ability of two plant materials, Cactus latifaria and the seeds of Prosopis juliflora, to act as natural coagulants was tested using a synthetic water formulated to resemble the drinking water supplied to the city of Maracaibo. Turbidity was added as kaolin. The coagulation ability of the two materials was assessed by the use of standard jar test measurements. Both materials produced comparable turbidity removals and were able to produce a final water whose turbidity was close to the required standard of 5NTU with both high (100-200 NTU) and low (30-40 NTU) initial turbidities. This was comparable with the performance achieved by previous workers using Moringa oleifera extracts. The optimum coagulant dose was found to be lower than that for aluminium sulphate. Treatment of the raw vegetable solids with solvents produced coagulants which, in some cases, were different from the raw materials and suggested that non-polar material might be involved with the coagulation process.
    Journal article
    Process Biochemistry, November 1999, vol. 35, no. 3, pp. 391-395(5) Elsevier Science | School of Civil Engineering, Birmingham University, Edgbaston, Birmingham, UK School of Civil Engineering, University of Zulia, PO Box 526, Maracaibo, Venezuela. | 0032-9592
    Keywords : Natural coagulants; Turbidity removal
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 20000306358 Ingenta, Online articles, DOI (article): 10.1016/S0032-9592(99)00085-0, SICI (online): 0032-9592353391395

  • Sugar cane technology and engineering.
    Mauritius Sugar Industry Research Institute, 1997

    The performance of the 17 sugar factories on Mauritius in 1996 is summarized, with indication of average, minimum and maximum values of the usual performance and quality indices. Novel aspects of some factory processes, control devices and engineering tasks are outlined, including: use of a natural flocculant from seeds of the drumstick tree Moringa oleifera in the production of 'organic sugar'; optimizing the operation of STG/FCB continuous centrifugals for high-grade massecuite, with 3.5% wash water; a mixed juice sampler for suspended solids determination; halogen thermogravimetry for rapid moisture determination in sugars, filter cake, bagasse and shredded cane; pilot ultrafiltration of molasses; direct cane analysis by press method; juice flow control system at Rose Belle sugar factory; assessment of the effect of boiler modification at Rose Belle sugar factory; boiler steam monitoring at Union st Aubin; evaluation of a new continuous centrifugal at MTMD sugar factory; filter station tests at FUEL sugar factory; simulation to find the most suitable arrangement for the evaporator station at Highlands sugar factory.
    Report
    MSIRI Annual Report 1996., 1997, pp.48-57 Mauritius Sugar Industry Research Institute, R?duit, Mauritius | R?duit, Mauritius. |
    Keywords : evaporators; ultrafiltration; thermogravimetry; flocculants; sugarcane juice; continuous centrifugal
    Location : | Mauritius
    Database : CABI, 19980306926

  • Moringa stenopetala provides food and low-cost water purification.
    Mayer, F.A., Stelz, E. Kidane, B. 1993

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Agroforestry today 1993-01-03, 5(1) : 18-22 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : MONTPELLIER - CNEARC http://www.biblio.siarc.cnearc.fr/ Cote : 149 | Ethiopia
    Database :

  • Flocculation and turbulence from bubble-induced mixing
    McConnachie, G.L., 1984

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Journal of the Institute of Water Engineers and Scientists, Vol.38, No.4, 337-347 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
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  • Water treatment in developing countries
    McConnachie, G.L., 1988

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Environmental Education, Vol.28, No.1, 23-24 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Turbulence intensity of mixing in relation to flocculation
    McConnachie, G.L., 1991

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Journal of Environmental Engineering, American Society of Civil Engrs, 117(6), 731-750 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Water treatment for developing countries using baffled- channel hydraulic flocculation
    McConnachie, G.L., 1993

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Water, Maritime and Energy Journal, Institution of Civil Engineers, 101, 55-61 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Design aspects of hydraulic flocculators
    McConnachie, G.L., Mtawalai, A. Young, R. 1994

    (No abstract)
    Conference paper
    Proc 20th WEDC conf., "Affordable water supply and sanitation", Colombo, Sri Lanka, Aug 1994, 284-288. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Activated carbon from Moringa husks and pods.
    McConnachie, G.L., Warhurst, A.M. Pollard, S.J.T. Chipofya, V. 1996

    (No abstract)
    Conference paper
    22nd WEDC conference, Proc. of 22nd WEDC conference, New Delhi, India, 279-282 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/cv/wedc/papers/22/groupf/mcconna.pdf |
    Database :

  • Active agents and mechanisms of coagulation of turbid waters using "Moringa oleifera".
    Narasiah, K.S., Ndadigengesere, A. Talbot, B.G. 1995

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Water Res. 1995, 29, N? 2 : 703-710 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : Eaudoc, Techn'Eaudoc, 66/92701

  • Influence of operating parameters on turbidity removal by coagulation with Moringa oleifera seeds.
    Narasiah, K.S., Ndadigengesere, A. 1996

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Environ.Technol. 1996, 17, N? 10 : 1103-1112 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : Eaudoc, Techn'Eaudoc, 67/01504

  • Development of the Moringa oleifera and Moringa stenopetala tree to provide valuable products : coagulant for water/wastewater treatment and vegetable oil.
    CEE, 1998

    (No abstract)
    Report
    database Eaudoc | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : Eaudoc, R&D'Eaudoc

  • Land and water management in a degrading micro-watershed in Haryana.
    Chandrasekharan, H.,, Singh, A. et al. 1996

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences 66(7): 429-433. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Activated carbon from Moringa oleifera husks and pods
    Chipofya, V.H., McConnachie, G.L. Warhurst, A.M. Pollard, S.J.T. 1997

    (No abstract)
    Conference paper
    World Bank Seminar, Blantyre, Malawi. 249, June 1997 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Odour testing using Moringa carbon
    Chipofya, V.H., McConnachie, G.L. Warhurst, A.M. Patey, E. Ridgeon, H. 1997

    (No abstract)
    Conference paper
    23rd WEDC Conf., Durban, South Africa, 150-152. 251 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Histoire d'eau (2), Dossier La Toile de la Vie ou la biodiversit
    Comit? Fran?ais contre la Faim, 1993

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Nations solidaires 3i?me trimestre 1993, N? 190 : 23 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : SILVA - 6 Avenue de Saint Mand? - 75012 PARIS - Tel : 33 1 43 40 11 25 - silva@cirad.fr code : 02271 |
    Database :

  • Use of Moringa oleifera as coagulant in the water treatment
    Mendoza, I., Fernandez, N. Ettiene, G. Diaz, A. 2000

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Ciencia, 2000, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 235-242 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : Ingenta, Uncover plus

  • Utilisation de la graine de Moringa. Essais de floculation au laboratoire et en vraie grandeur.
    Eleli, A., Faby, J.A. 1993

    (No abstract)
    Report
    CIEH, Ouagadougou | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : Eaudoc, Techn'Eaudoc, 66/88752

  • Moringa oleifera seeds for softening hardwater.
    Evison, L.M., Muyibi, S.A. 1995

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Water Res. 1995, 29, N? 4 : 1099-1105 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : Eaudoc, Techn'Eaudoc, 66/93195

  • Utilisation de la graine de Moringa, Essais de Floculation au laboratoire et en vraie grandeur
    Faby, J.A., Eleli, A.A. 1993

    (No abstract)
    Report
    CIEH Ouagadougou | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Clean water with Moringa seeds.
    FAO - NWFPS, 1996

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Non-Wood News - An information bulletin on Non-Wood Forest Products March 1996 N?3 : 8. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : SILVA - 6 Avenue de Saint Mand? - 75012 PARIS - Tel : 33 1 43 40 11 25 - silva@cirad.fr code : 02424 |
    Database :

  • Water clarification with natural coagulants and dissolved air flotation
    Folkard, G.K., Sutherland, J.P. Jahn, S.A.A. 1986

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Waterlines 1986, 5, (2), pp.23-26. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Natural coagulants in water clarification
    Folkard, G.K., Grant, W.D. Sutherland, J.P. 1987

    (No abstract)
    Conference paper
    In: Ince, M. ed. Rural Development in Africa: Proceedings of the 13th WEDC Conference, Lilongwe, Malawi, April 6-10, 1987. Loughborough University of Technology Press, 1988, pp.42-49. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Natural coagulants for small scale water treatment - potential applications
    Folkard, G.K., Sutherland, J.P. Grant, W.D. 1990

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Asian Society for Environmental Protection, 1990, Vol.6, No.2, pp. 1 -4. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Natural coagulants at pilot scale
    Folkard, G.K., Sutherland, J.P. Grant, W.D. 1992

    (No abstract)
    Conference paper
    In: Pickford, J.ed. Water, Environment and Management: Proceedings of the 18th WEDC Conference, Kathmandu, Nepal, 30 Aug. - 3 Sept. 1992. Loughborough University of Technology Press, 1993, pp.51-54. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Domestic water purification for developing countries
    Gupta, A., Chaudhuri, M. 1992

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Aqua Oxford 41(5): 290-298. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Innovative water and wastewater treatment for developing countries
    Folkard, G.K., Sutherland, J.P. Travis, V.E. 1993

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Journ. Ind. Wat. Soc., Sept. 1993, pp.29-32. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Moringa oleifera - a Multipurpose Tree
    Folkard, G.K., Sutherland, J.P. 1994

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Footsteps, No.20 Sept. 1994, pp.1 4-15. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Natural coagulants - A sustainable approach
    Folkard, G.K., Sutherland, J.P. Al-Kkalili, R. 1995

    (No abstract)
    Conference paper
    In: Pickford,J.et al eds. Sustainability of Water & Sanitation Systems: Proceedings of the 21st WEDC Conference", Kampala, Uganda, 4-8 September, 1995. WEDC Publications, pp263-266. | | 906055466
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Natural Coagulants for small scale water treatment
    Folkard, G.K., Sutherland, J.P. Grant, W.D. 1995

    (No abstract)
    Article in book
    In: Tharun et al (eds). Experiences in the Development of Small Scale Water Resources in Rural Areas, pub. Carl Duisberg, 1995, pp115-123. | | 9748256375
    Keywords :
    Location : |
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  • A naturally occurring cationic protein for coagulation of raw water.
    Folkard, G.K., Sutherland, J.P. Al-Kkalili, R. 1996

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Biocide Today. | |
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    Location : |
    Database :

  • Contact Flocculation Filtration using a natural polyelectrolyte for the treatment of low turbidity surface waters in developping countries
    Folkard, G.K., Sutherland, J.P. Al-Kkalili, R. 1996

    (No abstract)
    Conference paper
    In: Hahn H.H. et al (eds). Chemical Water and Wastewater Treatment IV, proceedings of the 7th Gothenburg Symposium, Edinburgh, Scotland, 23-25 September 1996. Pub: Springer, Berlin, ISBN3-540-61624-1,1996, pp213-223. | |
    Keywords :
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  • Fied trials of appropriate hydraulic floculation processes.
    Folkard, G.K., McConnachie, G.L. Mtawali, M.A. 1999

    Hydraulic flocculation has been used for water treatment throughout the world for many years and is particularly well suited for developing countries. Two types of flocculator are described, a horizontal-flow channel system, for which aspects such as retention time, channel slope, rapid mixing methods and baffle insertion were assessed and a contact flocculation-filter (CFF). Pilot plant tests were carried out over two years at Thyolo Water Treatment Works in Malawi using river water with crushed seed kernels from the indigenous tree Moringa oleifera Lam. (M. oleifera) or aluminium sulphate as coagulant. Both flocculation systems were able to reduce turbidity to below the World Health Organisation's guideline value of 5NTU for drinking water from raw water with average turbidities during test runs ranging from 15-5600NTU. The CFF method was particularly effective at low turbidities where <1NTU was attained at low dosages (<25mg/l) of M. oleifera. ''Flash'' mixing of coagulant using a simple equivalent of an in-line vortex mixer was shown to give more efficient treatment than mixing by alternative methods. M. oleifera as coagulant is shown to be feasible for treating river water for communities up to small town size and its production close to treatment plants would obviate importation of chemicals thus saving on foreign exchange, provide economic development of rural communities and reduce potential health hazards from chemical overdosing.
    Journal article
    Water Research, April 1999, vol. 33, no. 6, pp. 1425-1434(10) Elsevier Science | Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Edinburgh, The King's Buildings, Edinburgh, UK | 0043-1354
    Keywords : water treatment; hydraulic flocculation; contact flocculation-filtration
    Location : |
    Database : Eaudoc, Techn'Eaudoc, 67/10890 Ingenta, Online articles, DOI (article): 10.1016/S0043-1354(98)00339-X, SICI (online): 0043-135433614251434 INIST, 8940A

  • Moringa Oleifera a natural coagulant
    Gaikwad, R. W., Pardeshi, U. K. 2001

    Moringa Oleifera, a natural polyelectrolyte, can be used as primary coagulant. As coagulant it is non-toxic and biodegradable, also environment-friendly unlike alum. Comparative studies suggest that Moringa Oleifera can be used for water treatment in shelled and non-shelled forms. The optimum dosage of shelled Moringa Oleifera seeds was almost the same, while in case of non-shelled seed, dosage was greater for low initial turbidity waters.
    Journal article
    Chemical engineering world. 2001 , vol. 36 , no 4 , pp. 52 - 53 | Pravara Rural Engg College, Loni, Dist: Ahmednagar |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : INIST, 16006

  • Isolation and characterization of a flocculating protein from Moringa oleifera Lam.
    Gassenschmidt, U., Jany, K.D. Tauscher, B. Niebergall, H. 1995

    A flocculating protein from the seeds of Moringa oleifera Lam. was isolated by extraction with phosphate buffer followed by cation exchange chromatography. The molecular mass of the protein determined by SDS-PAGE was about 6.5 kDa, the isoelectric point was above pH 10. Amino acid analysis and sequencing showed high contents of glutamine, arginine and proline, and a total of 60 residues. The amino terminus is blocked by pyroglutamate. The flocculant capacity, determined in glass powder suspension, is comparable to that of a cationic polymer on polyacrylamide basis. Flocculation activity may be explained by the patch charge mechanism due to low molecular weight and high charge density.
    Journal article
    Biochimica et biophysica acta = International journal of biochemistry and biophysics.Apr 13, 1995. v. 1243 (3) p. 477-481. | Biochim Biophys Acta Apr 13; 1243 (3): 477-481 Bundesforschungsanstalt f?r Ern?hrung, Karlsruhe, Germany |
    Keywords : plant proteins; flocculants
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=7727523&dopt=Abstract |
    Database : AGRICOLA, 381 B522 Pubmed, 7727523 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Flockungsaktivit?t von Moringa oleifera-Samen verschiedener Herkunft und die Verwertbarkeit von Nebenprodukten des Abwasserkl?rungsprozesses in der Tierern?hrung
    Hering, N., 1997

    (No abstract)
    Report
    | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Natural Coagulants in Wastewater Treatment
    Holmes, R.G.H., Folkard, G.K. Travis, V.E. Sutherland, J.P. 1993

    (No abstract)
    Conference paper
    First International Conference 'Environmental Engineering', Vol.2, pp.47-54, 21-23 Sept. 1993, De Montfort University, Leicester, U.K. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • The Use of Natural Coagulants to Treat Wastewaters for Agricultural Re-use in Developing Countries
    Holmes, R.G.H., Travis, V.E. 1993

    (No abstract)
    Conference paper
    Paper presented at International Conference "Science and Technology in Third World Development", University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, pp.39-47, 5-7 April, 1993. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Water purification with Moringa seeds from Dian Desa.
    Indonesia, Dian Desa, 1985

    This paper describes a method for water treatment in rural areas of the tropics. The work was carried out in a test village in Indonesia by Dian Desa, a non-governmental organization involved in rural development. Seeds of Moringa oleifera were ground up and added to water in a clay jar fitted with 2 outlet tubes and bungs. After 2 h most solids had coagulated and fallen to the bottom of the container. Water was run off through the upper outlet tube into a second jar for storage. This is necessary as protein from the dissolved seeds starts to ferment and smell after 12 h. [Presumably, the lower outlet tube is for removal of the coagulated solids.] The treatment resulted in the removal of 98% of coliform organisms and no side-effects were observed in those consuming the water. R.A.E. Barrell
    Journal article
    Waterlines, 1985, Vol.3, No.4, pp.22-23 | | 0262-8104
    Keywords : water supply; purification
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19862027325

  • Studies on natural water coagulants in the Sudan, with special reference to Moringa oleifera seeds
    Jahn, S.A.A., Dirar, H. 1979

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Water SA (5) N?2 : 90-97. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : Eaudoc, Techn'Eaudoc, 66/21845

  • Traditional Water Purification in Tropical Developing Countries Existing Methods and Potential Application
    Jahn, S.A.A., 1981

    (No abstract)
    Book
    Manual No.117, Pub.: GTZ, Eschborn, Germany | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Effectiveness of traditional flocculants as primary coagulants and coagulant aids for the treatment of tropical raw water with more than a thousand-fold fluctuation in turbidity
    Jahn, S.A.A., 1984

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Documento presentado en la 15a Conf. Int. de la Asociaci?n Internacional de Distribuci?n del Agua, Monastir, T?nez, oct. de 1984; publicado en Water Supply, 2 (3/4). Special Subject pp.8-10 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Better water in the tropics by technology transfer from the laboratory to rural houses - Experiences from a pilot project with natural coagulants in the Sudan.
    Jahn, S.A.A., 1985

    (No abstract)
    Report
    Eschborn, Rep. Fed. de Alemania, GTZ. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Chapter 2. Water treatment with traditional plant coagulants and clarifying clays.
    Jahn, S.A.A., 1986

    The results are described of experimental water treatment with traditional plant materials from the Sudan including seeds of 5 Moringa species (M. oleifera, M. peregrina, M. stenopetala, M. longituba and M. drouhardii ), 2 bean species (Vicia faba and Faba fona ) and fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum ); bark of the tree Boscia senegalensis ; and dried stalks and fruits of the herb Blepharis persica. Three clays (or 'rauwq' = clarifier) from different regions in the Sudan, and alum, were also tested. The best coagulants/clarifying agents were Moringa seeds and B. senegalensis bark; these often had an efficiency similar to alum. M. peregrina was the least effective species in some experiments. Dosages, methods, and other possible plant coagulants are discussed.
    Book
    Schriftenreihe der GTZ, Deutsche Gesellschaft f?r Technische Zusammenarbeit, German Federal Republic, 1986, No.191, pp.67-157, 37 ref. | 2 col. pl. In Proper use of African natural coagulants for rural water supplies. Research in the Sudan and a guide for new projects, Jahn, S.A.A. GTZ, Dag-Hammarskj?ld-Weg 1+2, D6236 Eschborn 1, German Federal Republic. | 3-88085-305-3
    Keywords : Water pollution; seeds; Bark; minor forest products; Water purification; coagulants
    Location : | Sudan
    Database : CABI, 19880621781

  • Proper use of African natural coagulants for rural water supplies
    Jahn, S.A.A., 1986

    A second manual by this author on water purification - the first [Schriftenreihe der GTZ No. 117, 'Traditional water purification in tropical Developing Countries. Existing methods and potential application'] was published in 1981. The book provides a multi-disciplinary scientific assessment of attempts to introduce natural coagulants for domestic water treatment in the Sudan as a basis for further project strategies. Although the studies refer mostly to the Sudan, observations and experiences are discussed more generally for the tropics, and some of the experimental work was also carried out in Europe. The most important natural coagulant is seed from the fast-growing multipurpose species Moringa oleifera from India, which is sporadically grown in the Sudan and also cultivated in many other tropical countries in Africa, Asia and the Americas. There are 6 chapters, including one on Moringa, and 4 appendices (on Moringa and Moringaceae): 1. Annual fluctuations in raw water quality (Blue Nile, White Nile, Green-Belt Irrigation Canal); 2. Water treatment with traditional plant coagulants and clarifying clays; 3. Special microbiological and toxicological studies on water purification and water storage; 4. Cultivation of Moringa trees; 5. Introducing domestic water treatment to rural people; 6. Practical guide to domestic water coagulation and hygienic water storage; Appendix 1. The importance of Moringa ovalifolia as a potential flocculant crop; Appendices 2-4. Vernacular names of Moringa oleifera, other Moringaceae and less known plants tested as flocculating plant materials.
    Book
    Manual No.191, Pub.: GTZ, Eschborn, Germany. | GTZ, Dag-Hammarskj?ld-Weg 1+2, D6236 Eschborn 1, German Federal Republic. | 3-88085-305-3
    Keywords : rural economy; water pollution; Silviculture; seeds; water purification; coagulants
    Location : | Sudan; Africa
    Database : CABI, 19880621780

  • Using Moringa seeds as coagulants in developing countries.
    Jahn, S.A.A., 1988

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Journal Awwa, 60 (6) : 43-50 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : Eaudoc, Techn'Eaudoc, 66/61984

  • Simplified water treatment technologies for rural areas
    Jahn, S.A.A., 1989

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    GATE (GTZ), 1, pp.37-41 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • From clarifying pearls and gems to water coagulation with alum.
    Jahn, S.A.A., 1999

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Anthropos 94.1999 : 419-430. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • L'arbre qui purifie l'eau: Culture de Moringa spp. au Soudan
    Jahn, Samia Al Azharia, Musnad, Hassan A. Burgstaller, Heinz 2002

    (No abstract)
    web publication
    Unasylva (FAO) | an instructive summary of Moringa use in Sudan and of the GTZ project in Sudan (in French) |
    Keywords :
    Location : http://www.fao.org/docrep/r7750f/r7750f04.htm |
    Database :

  • Moringa Oleifera: A Natural Coagulant Moringa Oleifera, a natural polyelectrolyte, can be used as primary coagulant. As coagulant it is non-toxic and biodegradable, also environment-friendly unlike alum
    Jasubhai Media PVT LTD (Pub), 2001

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Chemical Engineering World, 2001, vol. 36, no. 4, pp. 52-53 JASUBHAI MEDIA PVT LTD | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : Ingenta, Uncover plus

  • An Efficient Approach To The Design Of Hydraulic Flocculators For Water Treatment In Developing Countries.
    JIE LIU, 2002

    (No abstract)
    web publication
    | |
    Keywords :
    Location : http://www.jqw.demon.co.uk/jianbao6/tx-2k-2-0.htm |
    Database :

  • Effect of a water extract of Moringa oleifera seeds on the hydrolytic microbial species diversity of a UASB reactor treating domestic wastewater.
    Kalogo, Y., Rosillon, F. Hammes, F. Verstraete, W. 2000

    The effect of a continuous supply of a water extract of Moringa oleifera seeds (WEMOS) on the hydrolytic microbial population of biomass grown in mesophilic upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors treating domestic wastewater was investigated. The WEMOS-treated sludge had seemingly a wider diversity, with enterobacter and klebsiella as dominant hydrolytic bacteria, compared with the control sludge. Additional tests indicated that various hydrolytic bacteria could degrade WEMOS. It appeared that a continuous supply of WEMOS to an anaerobic digester, treating domestic wastewater, increased the diversity of hydrolytic bacteria and therefore enhanced the biological start-up of the reactor.
    Journal article
    Letters in Applied Microbiology, 2000, vol. 31, no. 3, pp. 259 BLACKWELL SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS LTD | Centre for Environmental Sanitation, Laboratory of Microbial Ecology and Technology (LabMET), Ghent University, Ghent and Fondation Universitaire Luxembourgeoise, Belgium. | 0266-8254
    Keywords : plant extracts; bacteria; anaerobic digestion; coagulants; plant proteins; seeds
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10972741&dopt=Abstract |
    Database : AGRICOLA, QR1 L47 CABI, 20001917128 Ingenta, Uncover plus, Online articles, SICI (online): 0266-8254313259264 INIST, 7415L Pubmed, PMID: 10972741 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Technical,feasibility of the treatment of domestic wastewater by a CEPS-UASB system.
    Kalogo, Y., Verstraete, W. 2000

    Raw domestic wastewater was treated continuously under laboratory conditions for 170 days by a chemically enhanced primary sedimentation (CEPS) followed by an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. The CEPS was carried out with 70 mg FeCl l from day 1 to 82 and with 24 ml l of the water extract of Moringa oleifera seeds from day 83 to 170. Compared to the natural primary sedimentation (NPS), the CEPS increased the ratio of soluble chemical oxygen demand to volatile suspended solids (CODs VSS) of the supernatant by a factor 3 and 10 respectively. Although the FeCl increased the CODs VSS ratio, it caused a decrease of the soluble content of the wastewater by a factor 1.4. This resulted in a low influent concentration supplied to the UASB reactor and consequently a low biogas production. However, the reactor achieved 54% removal of total COD (CODt) at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 2 hours and a volumetric loading rate (Bv) of 1.4 g COD l.d. The Moringa oleifera seeds, besides the increase of CODs VSS ratio, also allowed to increase the CODs content of the wastewater by a factor 2.2. As a consequence, the reactor produced a higher amount of biogas. The reactor achieved 71% removal of CODt at a HRT of 2 hours and a Bv of 4 g COD l.d. The UASB reactor operated without the need to discharge regularly the biological excess of sludge produced. The implementation of the CEPS can decrease the volume needed by a conventional one step UASB reactor by a factor 0.4.
    Journal article
    Environmental Technology 21, 1 : 55-65 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : Eaudoc, Techn'Eaudoc, 67/15258 INIST, 19606

  • Enhancing the start-up of a UASB reactor treating domestic wastewater by adding a water extract of Moringa oleifera seeds.
    Kalogo, Y., M'Bassiguie Seka, A. Verstraete, W. 2001

    Water extract of Moringa oleifera seeds (WEMOS) was used to enhance the start-up of a self-inoculated upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor treating raw domestic wastewater. Two reactors labelled control (RC) and WEMOS addition (RM) were started without special inoculum. Both reactors were fed continuously for 22 weeks with domestic wastewater containing an average total chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 320 mg O2/l and suspended solid (SS) of 165 mg/l. The reactors operated during the entire experimental period at 29 degrees C and at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 4 h. The RM reactor received 2 ml WEMOS per litre of influent. WEMOS solution was prepared on the basis of 2.5% (w/v) ground M. oleifera seeds in water. The results of 22 weeks' operation showed an improvement in the performance of the RM compared to that of the RC. The dosage of WEMOS in the feed (1) shortened the biological start-up period by 20%, (2) increased acidogenic and methanogenic activity by a factor of 2.4 and 2.2 respectively, (3) increased the specific biogas production by a factor of 1.6, (4) favoured fast growth of the sludge bed, and (5) allowed the aggregation of coccoid bacteria and growth of microbial nuclei, which are precursors of anaerobic granulation.
    Journal article
    Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, 2001, vol. 55, no. 5, pp. 644-651 SPRINGER VERLAG KG | Centre for Environmental Sanitation, Laboratory of Microbial Ecology and Technology (LabMET), Ghent University, Coupure L 653, 9000 Ghent, Belgium. | 0175-7598
    Keywords : biological treatment; waste water treatment; upflow anaerobic sludge; blanket reactor; anaerobic tre
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11414335&dopt=Abstract |
    Database : AGRICOLA, QR1 E9 CABI, 20023021329 Ingenta, Uncover plus INIST, 16771 Pubmed, PMID: 11414335 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Moringa oleifera, la plante purificatrice
    Lakhadari, M., 1998

    (No abstract)
    Report
    Agence de l'eau Seine Normandie | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : Eaudoc, Base Fontaine, B18960 SN

  • Science: vegetable pods may help solve third world's water woes
    Litherland, S., 1995

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    14 July 1995, Inter Press Service | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Effect of water coagulation by seeds of Moringa oleifera on bacterial concentrations
    Madsen M, Schlundt, J. El Fadil, E. O. 1987

    In Sudan, water from the Nile and other sources is treated with a suspension of seeds of Moringa oleifera (horse-radish tree) to remove turbidity. The authors describe a series of experiments on the effectiveness of this method for waters of different degrees of turbidity including water from the Blue Nile and White Nile. Water samples were pre-warmed to 30 deg C and inoculated with mixtures of different types of bacteria to give viable counts of 105-106/ml of water before treatment with a filtrate of Moringa seeds. There were marked decreases in turbidity (80.0-99.5%) and numbers of viable bacteria (90.00-99.99%) during the first 1-2 h. No regrowth was observed during the 24-h observation period for Vibrio cholerae (NAG), Streptococcus faecalis or Clostridium perfringens and regrowth was variable for Escherichia coli. However, regrowth was observed for Salmonella typhimurium and Shigella sonnei. Consequently, the authors suggest that the traditional indicators of faecal pollution in temperate climates may not be suitable for tropical waters and that detection of pathogens might be more appropriate. This procedure, however, would depend on the relative numbers of pathogens and indicator organisms present in the water. R.A.E. Barrell
    Journal article
    Journal Of Tropical Medicine And Hygiene 90(3): 101-109. | Inst. Hyg. & Microbiol., Royal Vet. & Agricult. Univ. Copenhagen, 13 B?lowsvej, DK-1870 Frederiksberg C, Denmark. | 0022-5304
    Keywords : surface water; purification
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=3586089&dopt=Abstract | Sudan; Africa
    Database : CABI, 19882050266 Pubmed, 3586089 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • USE OF SEEDS OF Moringa oleifera AND WOOD OF Phyllanthus emblica TO CLARIFY TURBID WATERS AND WASTEWATERS
    Moramudali, M.A.A.W., Fernando, P. Yapa, P.A.J. 2002

    (No abstract)
    web publication
    UNIVERSITY OF SRI JAYEWARDENPURA, SRI LANKA | an article a bout water clarifiaction with Moringa seeds |
    Keywords :
    Location : http://ybiol.tripod.com/forest/99sympo/9923mora.htm |
    Database :

  • A natural coagulant at pilot and full scale at Thyolo water treatment works
    Mtawali, M.A., Sutherland, J.P. Folkard, G.K. McConnachie, G.L. 1997

    (No abstract)
    Conference paper
    World Bank Seminar, Blantyre, Malawi, June 1997 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • L'arbre et le traitement des eaux - Traitement de l'eau : Y'at-il une solution miracle avec Moringa oleifera ?
    M?ller, D., Narbeburu, D. Collignon, B. 1997

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Le Flamboyant n?42 : 11-14 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : SILVA - 6 Avenue de Saint Mand? - 75012 PARIS - Tel : 33 1 43 40 11 25 - silva@cirad.fr code : CR42/11 |
    Database :

  • Tree seeds could solve African water problem
    Muluvi, Geoffrey, 2002

    (No abstract)
    web publication
    University of Dundee | a press release about the work of the University on water purification and a project in Kenya |
    Keywords :
    Location : http://www.dundee.ac.uk/pressreleases/tree.htm |
    Database :

  • Coagulation of low turbidity surface waters with Moringa oleifera seeds.
    Muyibi S.A., Okuofu, C. A. 1995

    The use of Moringa oleifera seed extracts both as primary coagulant aid and its conjunctive use with alum in treating low turbidity waters was studied. The laboratory based studies used the natural polyelectrolyte to treat waters with turbidities between 23 and 90 ntu, obtained from three surface water sources in Kano, Nigeria. On the average, 50% turbidity removal was achieved when Moringa oleifera was used as primary coagulant. In combination with alum, the rates at which flocs were formed were the same or often faster than with alum alone. In this study, between 40 and 80% savings in alum was observed. When used as a coagulant aid, the optimum dose was found to be 10 mg l while that of alum was 20 mg l. Finally, it was observed that the time Moringa oleifera is applied (after slow mixing), is critical in determining the efficiency of coagulation. The optimum time for this was found to be 50 seconds after slow mixing.
    Journal article
    International Journal of Environmental Studies. 1995 , vol. 48 , no 3-4 , pp. 263 - 273 | DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING, UNIVERSITY OF NEWCASTLE |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : INIST, 15191

  • Moringa oleifera Seeds for Softening Hardwater
    Muyibi S.A., Evison L.M. 1995

    In this paper, preliminary investigations into the possible use of Moringa oleifera seed suspension for the softening of hardwater are presented. Four water sources: synthetic water (distilled water spiked with calcium chloride), naturally hard surface water and groundwater from two tube wells at different locations were used for the study. Modified laboratory jar test procedures for coagulation studies were used for the experimental runs. Water hardness from the sources varied from 300 up to 1000 mg/l as CaCO3. The mechanism for softening was found to be due to adsorption with the adsorption isotherm approximating to the Langmuir type, and conversion of soluble hardness-causing ions to insoluble products by precipitation reactions. Removal efficiency was found to increase with increasing dosage of Moringa oleifera. Higher dosages were required to achieve equivalent residual hardness for water samples with the same initial hardness but higher number of hardness-causing species in the water. Hardness removal was found to be independent of pH of the raw water.
    Journal article
    Water Research, April 1995, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 1099-1104(6) Elsevier Science | Dep. Civil Eng., Univ. Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU, UK | 0043-1354
    Keywords : biological treatment; water hardness; reduction
    Location : http://www.treesforlife.org/moringa/waterabstract.pdf |
    Database : CABI, 19951904433 Ingenta, Online articles, DOI (article): 10.1016/S0043-1354(94)00250-B INIST, 8940A

  • Optimizing physical parameters affecting coagulation of turbid water with moringa oleifera seeds
    Muyibi, S.A., Evison L.M. 1995

    Moringa oleifera is a plant coagulant and coagulant aid which has potential for use on a large scale for treatment of turbid waters in tropical developing countries. This paper presents results of optimization studies on physical factors including rapid mix velocity gradient and time, slow mix velocity gradient and time, and dosage of M. oleifera for low, medium and high raw water turbidities (50-750 NTU). Regression analysis was also carried out to study the effect of multiple factor interaction in the coagulation of turbid water with M. oleifera. This was carried out using the results of experimental runs involving varying initial turbidity, M. oleifera dosage, rapid mix velocity gradient, slow mix velocity gradient, and slow mix time.
    Journal article
    Water Research, December 1995, vol. 29, no. 12, pp. 2689-2695(7) Elsevier Science | | 0043-1354
    Keywords : coagulation; rapid mix; slow mix; velocity gradient; multiple factor interaction; optimization
    Location : |
    Database : Eaudoc, Techn'Eaudoc, 66/96315 Ingenta, Online articles, DOI (article): 10.1016/S0043-1354(95)00133-6 INIST, 8940A

  • Coagulation of turbid water and softening of hardwater with Moringa oleifera seeds.
    Muyibi, S.A., Evison, L.M. 1996

    In this study, the effects of 5 process variables on softening hardwater and coagulation of surface water with a M. oleifera seed extract were investigated. Multiple regression analysis showed a strong correlation (R (adj.) = 0.99 between M. oleifera seed dosage and the initial hardness of synthetic hardwater. Since M. oleifera is known to be a polyelectrolyte, the softening mechanism is likely to be adsorption. An adsorption isotherm developed was approximately linear and conformed to the Langmuir type. For the coagulation studies, the water samples were from three rivers in Kano, Nigeria over a three month period during the rainy season (June-August 1994). The turbidity of the water sample varied from 105-350 NTU. When used as primary coagulant, M. oleifera was able to achieve up to 99% turbidity removal for two of the water samples at the optimum dosage of 250 mgfl. For the third water sample, the optimum dosage was 450 mg l which is assumed to be due the high value of the colour of the water. Saving in alum usage of up to 40% was achievable when M. oleifera was used in conjunction with alum.
    Journal article
    International Journal of Environmental Studies 1996 , vol. 49 , no 3-4 , pp. 247 - 259 | DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING, UNIVERSITY OF NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE, CLAREMONT ROAD |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : INIST, 15191

  • Softening hard wellwaters with Moringa oleifera seed extracts.
    Muyibi, S.A., Okuofu, C. A. 1996

    A study into the use of Moringa oleifera seed extract in the softening of hard water has been carried out with samples from 17 hand-dug wells in Kano metropolis, Nigeria. Of the 17 samples tested, 7 contained calcium and magnesium hardness while 10 contained calcium hardness only. The softening dose of Moringa oleifera varied from 700-2000 mg l and the required dose increased with initial hardness of the samples. The level of softening was found to be directly proportional to the dose used; and water samples with both calcium and magnesium hardness required more Moringa oleifera than samples with only calcium hardness, to achieve the same level of softening. All samples had hardness reduced to < 200 mg CaCO, the highest desirable concentration of hardness in drinking water recommended by the WHO. The softening mechanism was postulated to be a combination of adsorption and precipitation of the soluble hardness causing ions to insoluble solids flocs. The adsorption isotherm developed was linear and of the Langmuir type.
    Journal article
    International Journal of Environmental Studies 1996 , vol. 50 , no 3-4 , pp. 247 - 257 | CIVIL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT, UNIVERSITY OF NEWCASTLE |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : INIST, 15191

  • Moringa oleifera seeds as a flocculant in waste sludge treatment
    Muyibi, Suleyman Aremu, Noor, Megat Johari Mohd Ding Tai Ong Khor Woon Kai 2001

    In this study the results of a laboratory based investigation to determine the effectiveness of Moringa oleifera seeds as a flocculant for activated sludge treatment are presented. Waste sludge samples are activated sludge from Taman Dr. Tun. Ismail Activated Sludge Wastewater Treatment plant, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Moringa oleifera seed was applied as dry powder (shelled blended), solution (shelled blended), and solution (shelled blended oil extracted). Results of vacuum filtration studies showed that residual sludge volume of up to 11%, 20% and 45% for shelled blended oil extracted, shelled blended, and control (no Moringa applied), respectively, was achievable. Sludge volume reduction of up to 67% was achievable using gravity settling for shelled blended solution and 48% for shelled blended oil extracted respectively compared to the control. The shelled blended category applied in powder form performed the same as the solution of shelled blended but performed better than the shelled blended oil extracted category in gravity settling. The specific cake resistance of sludge treated with shelled blended Moringa oleifera averaged 2.5 ? 10 m kg at 4000mg l dosage. Vegetable oil from the shelled Moringa oleifera of up to 30% was obtained as a by product.
    Journal article
    International journal of environmental studies. 2001 , vol. 58 , no 2 , pp. 185 - 195 | Civil Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : INIST, 15191

  • Coagulant lae coagulant aid chak malet marum. Moringa seeds as coagulant and coagulant aid.
    Natthanat Prasomsi., 1994

    (No abstract)
    Thesis
    [Thesis abstracts 1994]. Ruam botkhatyo witthayaniphon pi kan suksa 2537. Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok (Thailand). Graduate School. Bangkok (Thailand). 1994. 778 p. 778 p. | |
    Keywords : seeds; coagulation;
    Location : Main Library, Kasetsart University,PO Box 1084,Bangkok 10903, Fax: (662) 5611369 , Email: libarn@ku.ac.th,Ms Piboonsin Watanaponge . |
    Database : AGRIS, 20+Q45600-023402

  • Active agents and mechanism of coagulation of turbid waters using moringa oleifera
    Ndabigengesere A., NarasiahM K.S. Talbot B.G. 1995

    Moringa oleifera is a tropical plant whose seeds contain an edible oil and water soluble substance which has excellent coagulation properties for treating water and wastewater. The efficiency and properties of Moringa oleifera as a natural coagulant in water treatment were studied and compared with alum, which is presently the most widely used industrial coagulant. It is shown that the active agents in aqueous Moringa extracts are dimeric cationic proteins, having molecular weight of 13 kDa and isoelectric points between 10 and 11. The mechanism of coagulation with Moringa oleifera appears to consist of adsorption and neutralization of the colloidal charges. Compared to alum, the optimal dosage of shelledMoringa oleifera seeds was almost the same (50 mg/1). In case of the non-shelled seeds, the dosage is greater (500 mg/1) for low initial turbidity waters. The purified proteins are more effective coagulants than alum. As a coagulant, Moringa is non-toxic and biodegradable. It is environmentally friendly, and unlike alum, does not significantly affect the pH and conductivity of the water after the treatment. Sludge produced by coagulation with Moringa is not only innocuous but also four to five times less in volume than the chemical sludge produced by alum coagulation. So, as a coagulant, Moringa oleifera may be a potentially viable substitute to alum.
    Journal article
    Water Research, February 1995, vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 703-710(8) Elsevier Science | Department of Civil Engineering, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1K 2R1, Canada | 0043-1354
    Keywords : natural coagulants; cationic proteins; coagulation-flocculation
    Location : |
    Database : Ingenta, Online articles, DOI (article): 10.1016/S0043-1354(94)00161-Y INIST, 8940A

  • Influence of operating parameters on turbidity removal by coagulation with Moringa oleifera seeds.
    Ndabigengesere, A., Narasiah, K.S. 1996

    A model turbid water was treated with Moringa oleifera seeds as a natural coagulant and various phenomena like coagulation - flocculation and sedimentation were observed in detail using jar-test equipment under laboratory conditions. Influence of pH, temperature, cation concentration and anion concentration of test water was studied. Also investigated was the effect of intensity and duration of rapid mixing as well as slow mixing on turbidity removal. Experiments were conducted at optimum dosage of a crude 5% (wt v) water extract of dry non-shelled Moringa oleifera seeds. It was found that variation of pH, cation concentration, anion concentration, and rapid mixing did not significantly affect the coagulation activity of Moringa oleifera seeds, while temperature and slow mixing did. Lower temperatures increased the residual turbidity, and in case of slow mixing, an optimal intensity and duration of 40 RPM and 40 minutes respectively were found, which corresponds to a velocity gradient G equal to 25 sec and a product Gt value of 6 x 10. Hence, for best results in turbidity removal in coagulation with Moringa oleifera seeds, only slow mixing is recommended at the optimum intensity and duration. Longer sedimentation time should be provided when treating colder waters.
    Journal article
    Environmental technology 1996 , vol. 17 , no 10 , pp. 1103 - 1112 | Department of Civil Engineering, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Qu?bec J1K 2R1, Canada. | 0959-3330
    Keywords : turbidity; water; treatment; seeds; flocculants
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19970604569 INIST, 19606

  • Quality of water treated by coagulation using Moringa oleifera seeds.
    Ndabigengesere, A., Narasiah, K.S. 1998

    A model turbid water was treated by coagulation-flocculation and sedimentation, with Moringa oleifera seeds as a coagulant, using jar tests. The quality of the treated water was analyzed and compared with that of the water treated with alum. Experiments were conducted at various dosages of the crude 5% water extract of both dry, shelled and non-shelled Moringa oleifera seeds. Measurements of pH, conductivity, alkalinity, cation and anion concentrations, showed that coagulation with Moringa oleifera seeds did not significantly affect the quality of the treated water. However, concentration of organic matter in the treated water increased considerably with the dosage of Moringa solution. Since this organic matter might exert a chlorine demand and also act as precursor of trihalomethanes during the disinfection with chlorine, it is suggested that Moringa oleifera seeds be used as a coagulant in water and wastewater treatment, only after an adequate purification of the active proteins.
    Journal article
    Water Research, 1 March 1998, vol. 32, no. 3, pp. 781-791(11) Elsevier Science | Department of Civil Engineering, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada | 0043-1354
    Keywords : seeds; turbidity; biological treatment; water quality; natural coagulants; vegetable oil
    Location : |
    Database : AGRICOLA, TD420 W3 CABI, 19980604791 Eaudoc, Techn'Eaudoc, 67/06641 Ingenta, Online articles, DOI (article): 10.1016/S0043-1354(97)00295-9, SICI (online): 0043-1354323781791 INIST, 8940A

  • Use of Moringa oleifera seeds as a primary coagulant in wastewater treatment
    Ndabigengesere, A., Subba Narasiah, K. 1998

    Samples of municipal and industrial wastewaters were treated by coagulation-flocculation and sedimentation, using a crude water extract of dry Moringa oleifera seeds as a primary coagulant. The quality of the treated wastewater was analyzed and compared to that of the wastewater treated with alum. Experiments were conducted at various dosages of the crude 5% (wt v) water extract of dry shelled and non-shelled Moringa oleifera seeds, using jar-test equipment. Parameters of quality of the wastewaters were measured before and after the treatment to evaluate the removal efficiency on the major pollutants of concern in wastewater treatment, such as suspended solids, chemical oxygen demand (COD), nutrients (phosphorus and nitrogen), microorganisms and heavy metals. Results showed that Moringa oleifera seeds were efficient as a primary coagulant in wastewater treatment for removal of suspended solids and microorganisms, and also removal of some metals. Nutrients and COD were not successfully removed. COD and nutrients were somehow increased by coagulation using Moringa oleifera seeds. Compared to alum, Moringa oleifera seeds produced 4 to 6 times less sludge volume. Alum was found to be quite effective in phosphorus removal. The increase in COD and nutrients observed in the case of Moringa oleifera seeds might be avoided by using purified proteins instead of the crude water extract.
    Journal article
    Environmental technology. 1998 , vol. 19 , no 8 , pp. 789 - 800 | Department of Civil Engineering, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : INIST, 19606

  • Moringa as an alternative to aluminium sulphate
    Nkhata, D., 2001

    (No abstract)
    Conference paper
    27th WEDC Conference, People and Systems for Water , Sanitation and Health, Lusaka, Zambia | |
    Keywords :
    Location : http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/cv/wedc/conferences/27/pre-prints/Nkhata.pdf |
    Database :

  • The use of Moringa oleifera (dan-da-lun) seed for the sedimentation and decontamination of household water. Part II: community-based study.
    Nyein, M. M., Aye, T. Khine, W. W. Wai, K. T. Tun, S. Htwe, S. S. Myint, T. Swe, T. 1997

    The seeds of Moringa oleifera were tested as clearing and sedimentation agents in household water in Thaung Gyi Lay village with 110 households. Questionnaires were completed for each household and follow-up visits were carried out to ascertain the hypothetical acceptability (attitude), initial acceptability (behaviour) and experimental acceptability. It was observed that 78.9 per cent of the people accepted to use Moringa oleifera seeds if these were easily available. For continuous use of Moringa oleifera seeds, 47.3 per cent wanted to use, 44.7 per cent could not decide and only three households (2.7 per cent) did not want to use these. It was observed that the taste and pH of water did not change after treatment with Moringa oleifera seeds. There was no complaint about the treated water. This study will highlight the acceptance to use Moringa oleifera seeds for the sedimentation of turbid water.
    Journal article
    Myanmar Health Sciences Research Journal, 1997, Vol.9, No.3, pp.163-166, 6 ref. | | 1015-0781
    Keywords : seeds; decontamination; water quality; sedimentation; non-wood forest products
    Location : | Myanmar
    Database : CABI, 20000615364

  • Improvement of extraction method of coagulation active components form Moringa oleifera seed.
    Okuda, T., Baes, A.U. Nishijima, W. Okada, M. 1999

    A new method for the extraction of the active coagulation component from Moringa oleifera seeds was developed and compared with the ordinary water extraction method (MOC-DW). In the new method, 1.0moll-1 solution of sodium chloride (MOC-SC) and other salts were used for extraction of the active coagulation component. Batch coagulation experiments were conducted using 500ml of low turbid water (50 NTU). Coagulation efficiencies were evaluated based on the dosage required to remove kaolinite turbidity in water. MOC-SC showed better coagulation activity with dosages 7.4 times lower than that using MOC-DW for the removal of kaolinite turbidity. MOC-SC could effectively coagulate more than 95% of the 50 NTU initial kaolin turbidity using only 4mll-1, while 32mll-1 of MOC-DW could only remove about 78% of the same kaolin turbidity. The improvement of coagulation efficiency by NaCl is apparently due to the salting-in mechanism in proteins wherein a salt increases protein-protein dissociations, leading to increasing protein solubility as the salt ionic strength increases. There was no difference in the coagulation efficiency observed for extracts using any of four 1:1 salts (NaCl, KNO3, KCl and NaNO3) in our study. Purification and isolation of the active component confirmed that the active component of MOC-SC was mainly protein.
    Journal article
    Water Research, October 1999, vol. 33, no. 15, pp. 3373-3378(6) Elsevier Science | | 0043-1354
    Keywords : oilseeds; coagulation; water treatment; kaolinite; low turbid water; natural coagulant
    Location : |
    Database : AGRICOLA, TD420 W3 Ingenta, Online articles, DOI (article): 10.1016/S0043-1354(99)00046-9, SICI (online): 0043-1354331533733378 INIST, 8940A

  • Coagulation mechanism of salt solution-extracted active component in Moringa oleifera seeds.
    Okuda, T., Base, A.U. Nishijima, W. Okada, M. 2001

    This study focuses on the coagulation mechanism by the purified coagulant solution (MOC-SC-pc) with the coagulation active component extracted from M. oleifera seeds using salt solution. The addition of MOC-SC-pc tap water formed insoluble matters. This formation was responsible for kaolin coagulation. On the other hand, insoluble matters were not formed when the MOC-SC-pc was added into distilled water. The formation was affected by Ca2+ or other bivalent cations which may connect each molecule of the active coagulation component in MOC-SC-pc and form a net-like structure. The coagulation mechanism of MOC-SC-pc seemed to be an enmeshment of Kaolin by the insoluble matters with the net-like structure. In case of Ca2+ ion (bivalent cations), at least 0.2mM was necessary for coagulation at 0.3mgC l-1 dose of MOC-SC-pc. Other coagulation mechanisms like compression of double layer, interparticle bridging or charge neutralization were not responsible for the coagulation by MOC-SC-pc.
    Journal article
    Water Research, 2001, vol. 35, no. ER3, pp. 830-834 PERGAMON PRESS | Department of Environmental Science, Faculty of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima, 739-8527, Japan. tetsuji@environ.hiroshima-u.ac.jp | 0043-1354
    Keywords : bivalent cation; coagulation; natural coagulant; salt extraction
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11228982&dopt=Abstract |
    Database : Ingenta, Uncover plus, Online articles, DOI (article): 10.1016/S0043-1354(00)00296-7, SICI (online): 0043-1354353830834 INIST, 8940A Pubmed, PMID: 11228982 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Isolation and characterization of coagulant extracted from Moringa oleifera seed by salt solution.
    Okuda, T., Baes, A.U. Nishijima, W. Okada, M. 2001

    It is known that M. oleifera contains a natural coagulant in the seeds. In our previous research, the method using salt water to extract the active coagulation component from M. oleifera seeds was developed and compared with the conventional method using water. In this research, the active coagulation component was purified from a NaCl solution crude extract of Moringa oleifera seeds. The active component was isolated and purified from the crude extract through a sequence of steps that included salting-out by dialysis, removal of lipids and carbohydrates by homogenization with acetone, and anion exchange. Specific coagulation activity of the active material increased up to 34times more than the crude extract after the ion exchange. The active component was not the same as that of water extract. The molecular weight was about 3000Da. The Lowry method and the phenol-sulfuric acid method indicated that the active component was neither protein nor polysaccharide. The optimum pH of the purified active component for coagulation of turbidity was pH 8 and above. Different from the conventional water extracts, the active component can be used for waters with low turbidity without increase in the dissolved organic carbon concentration.
    Journal article
    Water Research, 2001, vol. 35, no. ER2, pp. 405-410 PERGAMON PRESS | Department of Environmental Science, Faculty of Engineering, Hiroshima University 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima, 739-8527 Japan. tetsuji@environ.hiroshima-u.ac.jp | 0043-1354
    Keywords : seeds; purification; natural coagulants; chemical composition; medicinal plants
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11228992&dopt=Abstract | Philippines
    Database : AGRICOLA, TD420 W3 CABI, 20013015226 Ingenta, Uncover plus, Online articles, DOI (article): 10.1016/S0043-1354(00)00290-6, SICI (online): 0043-1354352405410 INIST, 8940A Pubmed, PMID: 11228992 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Studies on Traditional Water Purification Using Moringa oleifera Seeds
    Olayemi, A.B., Alabi, R.O. 1994

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Vol.15, No.3, 43pp | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Low technology water purification by bentonite clay and Moringa oleifera seed flocculation as performed in Sudanese villages: effects on Schistosoma mansoni cercariae.
    Olsen, A., 1987

    A flocculation technique used to clarify Nile water was used to remove S. mansoni cercariae (Puerto Rican strain) in dechlorinated tap water and artificial Nile water. Rauwag (the main clarifying component of which is bentonite), pure bentonite and Moringa oleifera seeds were used as flocculants. Rauwag from Alti removed 10 to 30% cercariae in one to 5 h, but after longer flocculation (8 and 12 h), the number of cercariae was greater than in control containers. Rauwag from Kutranj was very effective: 40 and > 90% of cercariae were removed in one and 3 h respectively in tap water and 99% (in one and 3 h) in Nile water. Bentonite was also very effective especially in tap water (> 90% at all exposure times). Crushed M. oleifera seed reduced the number of cercariae by 50 and 60% after one and 3 h of flocculation respectively in tap water and by > 90% after 4 h in Nile Water. Rauwag and M. oleifera seeds, but not bentonite, reduced water turbidity. In all tests cercariae liberated from the sediment represented < 4% of the cercariae originally sedimented.
    Journal article
    Water Research, 1987, Vol.21, No.5, pp.517-522, 21 ref. | Danish Bilharziasis Lab., Jaegersborg All? 1D, 2920 Charlottenlund, Denmark. |
    Keywords : water purification; parasites; helminths
    Location : | Sudan
    Database : CABI, 19880846500

  • Water quality and treatment.
    Pickford, J., Barker, P. Elson, B. Ince, M. Larcher, P. Miles, D. Parr, J. Reed, B. Sansom, K. Saywell, D. Smith, M. Smout, I. (Editors) 1997

    Fourteen papers and a summary of the discussion are presented from the theme of water quality and treatment within water management and sanitation provision in developing countries. The titles of the papers are: filtration with a natural coagulant; improving water quality assessment and supply; odour testing using moringa carbon; field-testing UV disinfection of drinking water; integrated water quality management in Harare; small scale unit for groundwater treatment; impact of water hyacinth on Lake Victoria; removal of heavy metals by slow sand filtration; participatory role in rural water treatment; bacteriological water testing by H2S method; pilot solar desalination plants in Bangladesh; performance aspects of a seawater greenhouse; innovations in solar water treatment; potentials of roughing filtration in Zambia.
    Conference paper
    Water and sanitation for all: partnerships and innovations. Proceedings of the 23rd WEDC Conference, Durban, South Africa, 1-5 September 1997., 1997, pp.143-191 Water, Engineering and Development Centre (WEDC) Loughborough University of Technology, Lough | Water and sanitation for all: partnerships and innovations. Proceedings of the 23rd WEDC Conference, Durban, South Africa, 1-5 September 1997. | 0-906055-54-7
    Keywords : water quality; waste water treatment; desalinization; heavy metals; water management; rural developm
    Location : | Zimbabwe; Kenya; Bangladesh; Zambia; Developing Co
    Database : CABI, 19981803552

  • Microporus carbons from Moringa oleifera husks for water purification in less developped countries.
    Pollard, S. J. T., Thompson, F. E. McConnachie, G. L. 1995

    High quality activated carbon can be prepared from the waste husks of Moringa oleifera, an indigenous tropical plant material. Steam activated husks exhibited a well-developed micropore volume of 0.57 cm g and a corresponding apparent surface area of 734 m g, as determined by BET N adsorption hysteresis. In an assessment of aqueous phase adsorptive performance, activated Moringa carbon was found to be comparable to commercial powdered activated water treatment carbons (PACs) and exhibited a Langmuir monolayer coverage constant (Q) of 1.89 mmol g for phenol adsorption from the aqueous phase
    Journal article
    WATER RESEARCH : (OXFORD). 1995 , vol. 29 , no 1 , pp. 337 - 347 | UNIV. EDINBURGH, DEP. CHEMISTRY |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database : Eaudoc, Eco'Eaudoc, 66/90750 INIST, 8940A

  • Un espoir pour le milliard de d?sh?rit?s qui ne disposent pas d'eau potable. La graine d'un arbre indien pourrait sauver l'eau du tiers monde.
    SAILD / Le Soir de Bruxelles, 1996

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    La Voix du Paysan n? 53 : 20, cite Le Soir de Bruxelles du 16/17-9-95 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : SILVA - 6 Avenue de Saint Mand? - 75012 PARIS - Tel : 33 1 43 40 11 25 - silva@cirad.fr code : PR53 |
    Database :

  • Water Purification in Tropical Developing Countries.
    Sania, A.V., Azhasia, S.D. 0

    (No abstract)
    Book
    GTZ, Eschborn. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Purification de l'eau. Deux techniques prometteuses pour les pays du Sud. Les espoirs suscit?s par le Moringa Oleifera, la plante qui purifie l'eau. Des biosorbants pour la purification des eaux pollu?es par des d?chets industriels.
    Schmitz, J.L., Huybrecht, D. 1996

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Echos du Cota 71 : 10-13 | Collectif d'Echanges pour la technique appropri |
    Keywords :
    Location : SILVA - 6 Avenue de Saint Mand? - 75012 PARIS - Tel : 33 1 43 40 11 25 - silva@cirad.fr code : PR71/10 MONTPELLIER - CNEARC http://www.biblio.siarc.cnearc.fr/ cote : 184 |
    Database :

  • Water clarification using Moringa oleifera
    Schwarz, D., 2001

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Gate, 2001, no. 1, pp. 17-20 GATE IN DEUTSCHE GESELLSCHAFT FUR TECHNISCHE | a technical bulletin about water purification with Moringa |
    Keywords :
    Location : http://www5.gtz.de/gate/techinfo/techbriefs/w1e_2000.pdf |
    Database : Ingenta, Uncover plus

  • Seeds of Moringa species as naturally occurring flocculants for water treatment
    Sutherland, J. P., Folkard, G. K. Grant, W. D. 1989

    A three yr study investigated the coagulating properties of seeds of Moringa oleifera and M. stenopetala in laboratory and field conditions. Whole crushed seed kernels of both species were effective in removing turbidity from waters with high initial turbidity (bacterial contamination was reduced by 90-99.9%). The active ingredients, when isolated, were 2 water soluble proteins: freeze drying of this water soluble material provided a means of concentrating the proteins and reducing variation between dosages. This extract was needed in lower doses to give an equivalent performance to the whole crushed seed. Field studies, carried out in Malawi between October 1988 and February 1989, were partly at variance with the laboratory data, as the freeze dried extract of M. stenopetala was needed in greater quantities than the whole seed treatment. Alum and M. oleifera whole seed added in approximate equal concentration, in a process termed 'co-coagulation', resulted in 50-80% reductions in alum usage.
    Journal article
    Science, Technology & Development, 1989, Vol.7, No.3, pp.1 91-197. | Department of Engineering, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK. | 0950-0707
    Keywords : Seeds
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 19910648321

  • The introduction of natural coagulants to water treatment practices in Malawi - Field Studies -
    Sutherland, J.P., 1989

    (No abstract)
    Conference paper
    Paper presented at International Seminar "The Use of Natural Coagulants in Water Treatment", Yogyakarta, Indonesia, 2-7 October 1989. Proceedings to be published by GTZ, Bonn. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • The use of Moringa oleifera seeds in water and wastewater treatment
    Sutherland, J.P., Folkard, G.K. Grant, W.D. 1992

    (No abstract)
    Conference paper
    International Seminar "Atelier Oleasilva" Centre Regional d'Energie Solaire (CRES), Bamako, Mali, pp. 1 13-116, 6-1 0 July 1992. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Performance of a natural coagulant at pilot and full scale in Malawi
    Sutherland, J.P., Folkard, G.K. Mtawali, M.A. Young, R.J. 1993

    (No abstract)
    Conference paper
    First Southern Africa Water & Wastewater Conference. "Southern Africa after the drought", pp.87-92, 21-24 Sept. 1993, Johannesburg, South Africa. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Moringa oleifera as a natural coagulant.
    Sutherland, J.P., Folkard, G.K. Mtawali, M.A., Grant, W.D. 1994

    (No abstract)
    Conference paper
    In: Pickford, et al. eds. Affordable Water Supply & Sanitation: Proceedings of the 20th WEDC Conference, Colombo, Sri Lanka, 22-26 August 1994. Intermediate Technology Publications, 1994, pp.297-299. | | 906055423
    Keywords :
    Location : http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/cv/wedc/ papers/20/sessioni/sutherla.pdf |
    Database :

  • Natural coagulants for appropriate water treatment - a novel approach
    Sutherland, J.P., Folkard, G.K. Grant, W.D. 1990

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Waterlines, 1990, Vol.8, No.4, pp.30-32. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Moringa oleifera at pilot/full scale.
    Sutherland, J.P., Folkard, G.K. Mtawali, M.A. Grant, W.D. 1993

    (No abstract)
    Conference paper
    In Pickford, et al. eds. Water, Sanitation, Environment & Development: Proceedings of the 19th WEDC Conference, Accra, Ghana, 6-1 0 September 1993. Intermediate Technology Publication, 1993, pp- 109-111. | | 906055393
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Development of robust water treatment processes incorporating natural coagulants.
    Sutherland, J.P., Folkard, G.K. 1995

    (No abstract)
    Report
    Leicester University Research Report 95-26, September 1995. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Water treatment by flocculant compounds of higher plants.
    Tauscher, B., 1994

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Plant Research and Development 40 pp.56-70 | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • High Rate Contact Flocculation - Filtration Using Natural Coagulants
    Travis, V.E., Sutherland, J.P. Folkard, G.K. 1993

    (No abstract)
    Conference paper
    First International Conference 'Environmental Engineering', Vol.2, pp.39-46, 21-23 Sept. 1993, De Montfort University, Leicester, U.K. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Preliminary investigations into the use of seeds from the tree Moringa oleifera as a treatment for wastewaters
    Travis, V.E., Folkard, G.K. Sutherland, J.P. 1993

    (No abstract)
    Report
    Leicester University Engineering Research Report, 93-3, pp.34, February 1993. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :

  • Adsorption of the cyanobacterial hepatotoxin microcystin-LR by a low-cost activated carbon from the seed husks of the pan-tropical tree, Moringa oleifera
    Warhurst A.M., Raggett S.L. McConnachie G.L. Pollard S.J.T. Chipofya V. Codd G.A. 1997

    A low-cost activated carbon from the pan-tropical multipurpose tree Moringa oleifera removes the cyanobacterial hepatotoxin microcystin-LR in quantitative amounts from water in batch adsorption trials. The potential of M. oleifera seed husk carbon for cyanobacterial toxin removal in drinking water treatment in tropical countries is discussed.
    Journal article
    The Science of the Total Environment, 27 November 1997, vol. 207, no. 2, pp. 207-211(5) Elsevier Science | Pollard S.J.T.[1] [1]Scottish Environment Protection Agency, Environmental Strategy Directorate, Erskine Court, The Castle Business Park, Stirling, FK9 4TR, UK | 0048-9697
    Keywords : Activated carbon; Algal toxins; Low-cost adsorbents
    Location : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=9447749&dopt=Abstract |
    Database : CABI, 19980608705 Ingenta, Online articles, DOI (article): 10.1016/S0048-9697(97)00260-X, SICI (online): 0048-96972072207211 Pubmed, 9447749 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Pore structure and adsorption characteristics of steam pyrolysis carbons from Moringa oleifera
    Warhurst A.M., Fowler G.D. McConnachie G.L. Pollard S.J.T. 1997

    A series of activated carbons has been prepared from the waste seed husks of the tropical multi-purpose tree Moringa oleifera, using a single-stage steam pyrolysis activation. Carbons were characterised by N2 adsorption, CHN analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms were analysed by the BET, t-plot and Horvath and Kawazoe methods. All the carbons were microporous, with those activated at 750oC for 120 minutes (750120) and 800oC for 30 or 60 minutes having the highest BET surface areas, of 730, 713 and 774 m2 g-1, respectively. A simple acid rinse of the 800oC/30 minutes carbon increased the surface area to 932 m2 g-1. The 80060 carbon had the highest mesopore and macropore surface area, 135.7 m2 g-1, compared to 92.7 m2 g-1 for the 80030 carbon. Scanning electron micrographs of the 80030 carbon showed a lignocellulosic macropore structure, cleaned by the steam pyrolysis.These results show that it is possible to produce a high quality microporous activated carbon from M. oleifera husks using a simple single-stage steam pyrolysis activation.
    Journal article
    Carbon, 1997, vol. 35, no. 8, pp. 1039-1045(7) Elsevier Science | Pollard S.J.T.[1] [1]Scottish Environment Protection Agency, Environmental Strategy Directorate, Erskine Court, The Castle Business Park, Stirling, FK9 4TR, U.K. | 0008-6223
    Keywords : Activated carbon; pyrolysis; adsorption; porosity
    Location : |
    Database : Ingenta, Online articles, DOI (article): 10.1016/S0008-6223(97)00053-5, SICI (online): 0008-622335810391045 INIST, 11401

  • The production of activated carbon for water treatment in Malawi from the waste seed husks of Moringa oleifera.
    Warhurst, A.M., McConnachie, G.L. Pollard, S.J.T. 1996

    Moringa oleifera is a multi-purpose tree whose seeds can be used as a coagulant in water treatment. The seed husks are currently discarded as a waste, but research has shown that they can be converted into activated carbon by carbonisation at 485oC under N2 for 30 minutes, followed by activation in steam at 850oC for 5 minutes. Here we report an improved method of carbon production, using a single-stage steam pyrolysis activation that is more appropriate for the intended use. Steam pyrolysis at 750oC for between 30 and 120 minutes produced a high quality microporous activated carbon at a yield of between 11 % and 17 %, with increases in soak time giving improved pore development and more mesoporosity. The apparent N2 BET surface area of the M. oleifera carbon produced by soaking at 750oC for 120 minutes was 730.0 m2 g-1, similar to that of the carbon produced previously by the two-stage process, 734.3 m2 g-1. The phenol adsorptive capacities of the carbons pyrolysed at 750oC were similar to a commercial carbon. These results show that it is possible to produce high quality activated carbon from the waste seed husks of M. oleifera using a simple one-stage 750oC steam pyrolysis. This provides a low-cost method of producing activated carbon locally in developing countries for use in water treatment.
    Journal article
    Water Science and Technology, 1996, vol. 34, no. 11, pp. 177-184(8) Elsevier Science | In the series analytic: Water Quality International '96. 7. Agro-industries waste management; appropriate technologies and waste stabilization ponds; wastewater reclamation and reuse / edited by D. Ballay et al. Selected proceedings of the 18th Biennial | 0273-1223
    Keywords : waste utilization; pyrolysis; activated carbon; water purification; steam pyrolysis; low-cost adsorb
    Location : |
    Database : AGRICOLA, TD420 A1P7 Ingenta, Online articles, DOI (article): 10.1016/S0273-1223(96)00836-0, SICI (online): 0273-12233411177184

  • Characterisation and applications of activated carbon produced from Moringa oleifera seed husks by single-step steam pyrolysis.
    Warhurst, A.M., McConnachie, G.L. Pollard, S.J.T. 1997

    The seed husks of the multipurpose tree Moringa oleifera are potentially a waste product that may be available in large quantities, and previous work has demonstrated that a microporous activated carbon can be produced from them by carbonisation under nitrogen followed by activation in steam. This research examines the efficacy of a simpler and cheaper activation process, single-step steam pyrolysis activation, with a view to promoting the production of low-cost activated carbon in the developing world.Husks were heated in a steam atmosphere to 750oC for 30 or 30 or 120 min, or 800oC for 30 min, then the resulting carbons were tested to determine their iodine numbers and adsorption isotherms for phenol, 4-nitrophenol and methylene blue. Phenol and 4-nitrophenol were adsorbed rapidly by all three carbons, with 80-90% w/w adsorbed in the first 30 min, whereas methylene blue adsorption was slower. Pyrolysis at 800oC for 30 min produced a carbon (yield 12.2% w/w) with an iodine number of 703 mg g-1, a phenol specific surface area (SSA) of 629 m2 g-1, a 4-nitrophenol SSA of 664 m2 g-1 and a methylene blue SSA of 211 m2 g-1. The carbon produced at 750oC for 120 min (yield 11.9% w/w) had similar properties, but the one produced at 750oC for 30 min (yield 16.6% w/w) had a less developed porosity. The adsorbance characteristics of the two best carbons were superior to those produced previously by the conventional two-stage carbonisation-activation, and were competitive with commercial carbons. These results demonstrate that steam pyrolysis activation of M. oleifera husks could provide a low-cost, local source of high quality activated carbon in the developing world.
    Journal article
    Water Research, April 1997, vol. 31, no. 4, pp. 759-766(8) Elsevier Science | Pollard S.J.T.[1] [1]Scottish Environment Protection Agency, Environmental Strategy Directorate, Erskine Court, The Castle Business Park, Stirling FK9 4TR, U.K. | 4 313 542 521 997
    Keywords : oilseeds; activated carbon; pyrolysis; physicochemical properties; industrial applications; water tr
    Location : |
    Database : AGRICOLA, TD420 W3 CABI, 19971906722 Eaudoc, Techn'Eaudoc, 67/01671 Ingenta, Online articles, DOI (article): 10.1016/S0043-1354(97)80989-X, SICI (online): 0043-1354314759766 INIST, 8940A

  • Plant materials as natural flocculant in cane juice clarification.
    Wong SakHoi, Tse ChiShum 1999

    There is a continual quest for a natural flocculant for juice clarification in the production of organic sugar as the use of synthetic polyelectrolytes is barred. The clarifying property of the seeds of drumstick tree (Moringa oleifera ) in food and water purification processes is well known in rural areas of developing countries and has been recently exploited in full scale water treatment plants in Africa. Laboratory tests showed that a sieved solution of crushed seeds of M. oleifera , when applied at 0.16% on limed juice produced a solution (52%) clearer than one without a flocculant, but the mud produced was twice in volume. The latter could be reduced by 10% by using bentonite at 0.05% on juice, with the added benefit of reducing the juice turbidity by 10%. The clarifying properties of the edible fruit of Cordia myxa were also investigated. Laboratory tests showed that when solution of C. myxa fruit was added between 0.016 and 0.04% on limed juice, up to 42% clearer solution could be obtained with a reduction of 9% in mud volume. Pilot tests confirmed that C. myxa solution applied for one hour at 0.02% on limed juice actually withheld the rising tendency in the clear juice turbidity during that period.
    Conference paper
    23rd ISSCT Congress, New Delhi, India, 22-26 February, 1999. Factory program., 1999, pp.7-16, 10 ref. International Society Sugar Cane Technologists (ISSCT), Bangkok, Thailand | Mauritius Sugar Research Institute, R?duit, Mauritius. |
    Keywords : bentonite; laboratory tests; purification; clarification; sugarcane juice; flocculants
    Location : |
    Database : CABI, 20000309615

  • Clarification using plants and plant material
    X, 2002

    (No abstract)
    web publication
    Source Book of Alternative Technologies for Freshwater Augmentation in Latin America and the Caribbean (UNEP) | an extensive survey of the use of Moringa and other plant materials for water purification |
    Keywords :
    Location : http://www.oas.org/usde/publications/Unit/oea59e/ch22.htm |
    Database :

  • Environmental health techniques in rural areas : water treatment
    X, 2002

    (No abstract)
    web publication
    University of Harboug | a technical publication of the different ways to treat the water |
    Keywords :
    Location : http://www.tu-harburg.de/wwv/vorlesung/EnvHealthTech_04.pdf |
    Database :

  • PIANTE PER LA PURIFICAZIONE DELL'ACQUA Per la prima volta un prodotto coagulante naturale viene utilizzato su vasta scala con risultati pari a quelli ottenuti con prodotti chimici
    X, 2002

    (No abstract)
    web publication
    Scienzaegoverno | a scientific article about water purification with Moringa (in Italian) |
    Keywords :
    Location : http://www.scienzaegoverno.com/42/42supp/piante.htm |
    Database :

  • Simple Methods for the Treatment of Drinking Water
    X, 2002

    (No abstract)
    web publication
    Centre for Ecological Sciences (India) | an instructive course about the principles of water purification |
    Keywords :
    Location : http://ces.iisc.ernet.in/energy/water/paper/drinkingwater/simplemethods/technology.html |
    Database :

  • Sourcebook of Alternative Technologies for Freshwater Augumentation in Africa Use of Natural plants
    X, 2002

    (No abstract)
    web publication
    UNEP - International Environment Technology Centre | a technical description and cost analysis of using Moringa seeds in water treatment |
    Keywords :
    Location : http://maestro.unep.or.jp/ietc/Publications/TechPublications/TechPub-8a/natural.asp |
    Database :

  • A reappraisal of the Engelund bed load equation
    Zhang, X., McConnachie, G.L. 1994

    (No abstract)
    Journal article
    Hydrological Sciences Journal, 39(6), 561-567. | |
    Keywords :
    Location : |
    Database :